Truck Month Summer Reading Amazon Fashion Learn more nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Brett Dennen Father's Day Gift Guide 2016 Fire TV Stick Luxury Beauty The Baby Store Find the Best Purina Pro Plan for Your Pet Amazon Cash Back Offer bighero bighero bighero  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Starting at $49.99 All-New Kindle Oasis UniOrlando Shop Now Learn more

Son Of Saul 2015 R

3.7 out of 5 stars (26) IMDb 7.7/10

In 1944 Auschwitz-Berkenau, Saul decides to carry out an impossible task: offer a proper burial for the body of a boy he takes for his son.

Starring:
Géza Röhrig, Levente Molnár
Runtime:
1 hour, 47 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 48 hours to finish once started.

Rent Movie HD $5.99
Buy Movie HD $14.99

Buy

Buy Movie HD $14.99
Buy Movie SD $13.99

Rent

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 48 hours to finish once started.

Rent Movie HD $5.99
Rent Movie SD $4.99
More Purchase Options
By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama
Director László Nemes
Starring Géza Röhrig, Levente Molnár
Supporting actors Urs Rechn
Studio Sony Pictures Classics
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Paul Allaer TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 26, 2016
Format: Amazon Video
"Son of Saul" (2015 release from Hungary; 107 min.) brings the story of a Jewish Hungarian man named Saul. Saul works/is forced to work as a "sondercommando" in one of the German concentration camps (Auschwitz? Birkenau?). As the movie opens, the camera focuses on Saul as he goes from job to job, leading the next wave of Jewish prisoners towards the gas chambers and closer to their death. Then, miraculously, a young boy survives the gassing. A German doctor quickly smothers the life from the boy, and orders an autopsy. Saul, however, wants to provide a proper burial for the boy and desperately seeks to find a rabbi among the Jewish prisoners who can say the 'kaddish' (burial prayers). To tell you more would spoil your viewing experience, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.

Couple of comments: in my life time I have seen quite a few movies that focus on or relate to the WWII concentration camps. I can honestly tell you, though, that "Son of Saul" is a unique film. For starters, the movie is shot in almost 1:1 ration, actually probably more like a 4:3 ratio, and the camera focuses mostly on Saul, and rarely do we get a full-blown shot of what goes on around him. Not that we don't know, and certainly when you add the outstanding audio-soundtrack, we realize all too well that this is living hell, and worse. Bodies are laying about, we hear the furnaces, we feel and recoil as chaos and pure evil unfolds. It all make for a very harrowing movie, but one that is unforgettable. It is often said about the holocaust that we should never forget. Let me tell you: "Son of Saul" will make you never forget. Géza Röhrig in the role of Saul brings an epic performance, with little dialogue, but body language that speaks volumes.
Read more ›
12 Comments 56 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
While no movie can fully capture the madness of what life in a concentration camp must have been like, Làszlò Nemes’ Cannes Grand Prize Award winning Son of Saul, his first feature film, may come close to recreating the experience. Written by the director and Clara Royer and shot in 35mm with a 4:3 aspect by cinematographer Mátyás Erdély (“Miss Bala”), Son of Saul explores the moral dilemma of a group of Hungarian Jews known as the Sonderkommandos who were forced to collaborate with the Germans at Birkenau in exchange for preferential treatment in the way of food and living arrangements, even though the bargain extended their lives for only a few months.

Set in 1944 only months away from liberation, Géza Röhrig is Saul Auslander, a Sonderkommando, inducted on his arrival at Auschwitz-Birkenau under the threat of death and given the task of emptying trainloads of new prisoners, telling them lies about fresh coffee and an offer of employment after their shower, then, under the supervision of the SS, shutting the doors and standing to one side, listening to the screaming and crying. Saul’s job does not end there, however. He is charged with removing the bodies, referred to as “pieces,” from the gas chambers, confiscating any valuables they may have, and incinerating them in outdoor pits.

With the camera always focused on Saul, breathing down his neck like the Dardenne Brothers’ camera in "The Son", he moves around swiftly going from one job to the next showing little outward emotion among the confusion. He stops long enough, however, to witness the body of a young boy still breathing after having survived the gas chamber.
Read more ›
Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
“Son of Saul” has just recently opened in Hawaii (perfectly coinciding with its OSCAR Win for Best Foreign Language film last Sunday) I had previously read about this film, produced in Hungary, starring the poet, actor, musician Géza Röhrig as ‘Saul Auslander’ a few months ago and it did sound like director László Nemes decided to present a totally different kind of Holocaust movie………… but I could never have anticipated just how unusual (and viscerally-impactful) this film genuinely is until seeing it a couple nights ago.

The key difference here is that director László Nemes forces us to actually ‘Live’ within Saul’s nightmarish concentration-camp reality (literally side-by-side with him, as if perched directly on his shoulder) because for nearly all of the hour + 47 minute run-time, the camera seems to focus directly on Saul’s facial-expressions as he moves from one de-humanizing agony to the next (witnessing countless unspeakable acts of cruelty along the way)

During the Holocaust Saul Auslander exists within the horrifying death-soaked realm as a concentration-camp sonderkommando or ‘kapo’ (i.e.
Read more ›
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews