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Song of Songs (Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible) Hardcover – June 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible
  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Brazos Press (June 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1587431351
  • ISBN-13: 978-1587431357
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,343,793 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This series places the accent on 'theological' and reflects current interpretive ferment marked by growing resistance to the historical-critical project. It may be that scripture interpretation is too important to be left to the exegetes, and so a return to the theologians.' Walter Brueggemann, Columbia Theological Seminary --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Praise for previous volumes in the Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible

"[Peter] Leithart does an eminently satisfying work of exposition [in 1 & 2 Kings], although his work engages age-old questions of exegetical method. . . . Leithart's work [is] stimulating in its unabashedly theological interpretive stance. Such a starting point for the exegetical task inquires differently of the text and renders fresh applications and observations. The two disciplines of biblical and theological studies can only benefit from cross-disciplinary engagement and, certainly, Leithart demonstrates that both disciplines can be used critically and in service of the Church."--Lissa M. Wray Beal, Toronto Journal of Theology

"For many Christians, Deuteronomy is another collection of arcane Jewish laws that have no bearing on church life in the least. . . . [Telford] Work's contribution is useful inasmuch as he actually helps readers think about just how Deuteronomy could be applied to the church. This is something many commentaries simply ignore. . . . This commentary will force readers to remember it is not enough to leave this wonderful revelation in its historical context."--Steven H. Sanchez, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

"The unique feature of the Brazos series is to have theologians provide exposition of specific biblical books. In this it follows a longstanding church tradition in which theology was drawn from scripture and was not alien to or estranged from it. [In Revelation, Joseph] Mangina . . . provides a thoughtful and competent analysis of this complex New Testament book. He certainly engages biblical scholarship, but his focus is appropriately on the fundamental theological perspective of Revelation, which he sees as a radically christological focus."--Donald Senior, CP, The Bible Today

"[Ephraim] Radner's commentary [on Leviticus] is full of stimulating insights from which biblical scholars will benefit. . . . Those who work hard will profit from the often-stimulating associations he finds between Leviticus and other parts of the Bible. Moreover, his commentary provides the first thorough synthesis of premodern Christian and Jewish interpretation of Leviticus."--Leigh Trevaskis, Review of Biblical Literature

More About the Author

Paul J. Griffiths joined the faculty of Duke Divinity School in January 2008, as Warren Chair of Catholic Theology. He was born in England in 1955, and lived and was educated there until 1980, when he moved to the USA. Since then, he has lived mostly in the USA, becoming a US citizen in 1994. He was received into the Catholic Church in 1996, having previously been Anglican. He is married, with two children and two grandchildren. He has held academic positions at the University of Notre Dame (1986-1990), the University of Chicago (1984-1986, 1990-2000), and the University of Illinois at Chicago (2000-2007).

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Caelius Spinator on February 12, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was quite fortunate to come across this volume while looking for a commentary on this particular book of Scripture. The prefatory essay to the series is extraordinary, setting forth a plan for a simultaneously orthodox and postmodern theological commentary on the Scriptures. Griffiths mostly succeeds and has produced a commentary grounded in tradition of reading the Song of Songs in Latin. My major criticisms are that I would have preferred direct commentary on the more ecumenically accessible and longer used Vulgate of Jerome as well as even more references to the Patristic and medieval commentary on the Song.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mary Ann Bryant on March 6, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very Theological and Deep. I haven't had the time to really sit down and absorb what the author is saying.
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