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Songs for a Dying Planet


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Audio CD, August 11, 1992
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 11, 1992)
  • Original Release Date: 1992
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B00000287U
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,516 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Shut Up
2. Fairbanks Alaska
3. Coyote Love
4. I Know
5. Certain Situations
6. Vote For Me
7. Them From Baroque Weirdos
8. The Friend Song
9. It's All Right
10. Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow
11. Decades
12. Song For A Dying Planet

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Charles Barillari on July 1, 2001
Format: Audio CD
...that Joe Walsh, with all his diversity, could come out with an album that has the ability not only to entertain, but to make you think, make you question, make you wonder. He touched on the problems with our society and the health of our planet in Ordinary Average Guy, but in Songs For A Dying Planet he reminds us that, if we're not mindful of the damage we're doing to Earth, that we won't have it to hand down to our children, and to their children after them.
While every song has meaning (aside from his remake of "Will you still love me") one of the last lines in one of the last songs really hits the target dead center:
"We are living on a dying planet, we're killing everything that's alive, and anyone who tries to deny it, wears a tie, and gets paid to lie"
Great album. Listen to it, not only with your ears, but with your head, and maybe even your heart.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Edward Z. Rosenthal on January 3, 2010
Format: Audio CD
"Song For a Dying Planet" is not an artistic statement, a contrived metaphor to catch our interest. It's an honest accurate description of what Joe Walsh was seeing. The weight of that awareness must have been crushing, it's astonishing that Joe managed to write about anything else. So, to me, it's odd how careful Joe is to not be self indulgent on this album, writing only one, maybe two songs on the subject. He could have written 10 or 15, he certainly had plenty to say on the state of the world. I heard him on Howard Stern talking about it a decade ago, and he was seriously concerned. It's now 17 years since this disc's release and things are worse, more grim and hopeless. Even more people living destructive, wasteful, stupid lifestyles.

Is there a point to dwelling or obsessing on this subject? I don't know, and apparently neither does Joe, 'cause he hasn't written an album since. He's kept busy doing Eagles and James Gang tours, but that's all mindless time filler compared to what he'd done on his own. I saw him solo in Philly in 1996 and he was so good. He'd just gotten sober and wanted to have fun. He did, and so did we. But it seems he's retreated from his realization that we're all very quickly heading for some truly horrible "stuff". He is doing bizarre, maybe irrational things lately, appearing with "Trans-Siberian Orchestra" as recently as a couple weeks ago. What's wrong with that, you ask? Have you listened to Trans-Siberian Orchestra? It's like Jimi Hendrix playing with River Dance... strange.

Anyway, as far as this album goes, or any album, for that matter, it almost seems absurd to bother critiquing it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Edward Z. Rosenthal on January 3, 2010
Format: Audio CD
"Song For a Dying Planet" is not an artistic statement, a contrived metaphor to catch our interest. It's an honest accurate description of what Joe Walsh was seeing. The weight of that awareness must have been crushing, it's astonishing that Joe managed to write about anything else. So, to me, it's odd how careful Joe is to not be self indulgent on this album, writing only one, maybe two songs on the subject. He could have written 10 or 15, he certainly had plenty to say on the state of the world. I heard him on Howard Stern talking about it a decade ago, and he was seriously concerned. It's now 17 years since this disc's release and things are worse, more grim and hopeless. Even more people living destructive, wasteful, stupid lifestyles.

Is there a point to dwelling or obsessing on this subject? I don't know, and apparently neither does Joe, 'cause he hasn't written an album since. He's kept busy doing Eagles and James Gang tours, but that's all mindless time filler compared to what he'd done on his own. I saw him solo in Philly in 1996 and he was so good. He'd just gotten sober and wanted to have fun. He did, and so did we. But it seems he's retreated from his realization that we're all very quickly heading for some truly horrible "stuff". He is doing bizarre, maybe irrational things lately, appearing with "Trans-Siberian Orchestra" as recently as a couple weeks ago. What's wrong with that, you ask? Have you listened to Trans-Siberian Orchestra? It's like Jimi Hendrix playing with River Dance... strange.

Anyway, as far as this album goes, or any album, for that matter, it almost seems absurd to bother critiquing it.
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Henry on April 16, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Despite the title of the album, there's not much "tree-hugging" here, just Joe showing off his typical knack for likeable, humorous lyrics and a catchy melody.
Some songs just don't work, such as "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow", "Coyote Love", and
"The Friend Song", but they are made up for by the winners such as "Vote For Me", "I Know", "Shut Up" and "Certain Situations". "Decades", a 12 minute opus, also works fairly well.
If you are a fan of Joe in his synth-heavy phase, you won't be disapointed.
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By Jeremy Diringer on April 3, 2008
Format: Audio CD
After battling with drugs, alcohol, and drum machines for much of the '80s, Joe Walsh had finally managed to kick those habits; fortunately-yet-unfortunately, this almost-but-didn't-quite translate to a return to form for the guitarist.

The first few songs work so well--"Shut Up" shows a fire that had been missing from his work for years (and manages to steal a couple classic guitar riffs yet still sound fresh), and the dissonant, half-intelligible "Coyote Love" melds a repetitive quasi-tribal beat and some guitar-abusing pyrotechnics into a slick, uncannily catchy mess. Even "I Know" revisits the unabashed sentimentalism of "Pretty Little Maids" to pleasant effect. Then it slips into the silly keyboard-laden joke-cracking pop-rock filler he's been stuck on since You Bought It You Name It. It's not bad, necessarily, and it's kinda catchy in a generic way, but it's still just treading water until his obligatory Serious Song Of The Album, "Decades"--a little preachy, but remarkably coherent and it works on its own terms.

If you've liked his goofball stuff (essentially There Goes the Neighborhood and everything thereafter), or if you're old fan who hadn't heard about this album before, it'll probably be worth your money. But if you're just getting into his music or wondering why his fans say he's a severely underrated musician, stick with earlier albums like But Seriously, Folks... or The Smoker You Drink, The Player You Get.
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