Songs For Silverman [Explicit]

August 19, 2008 | Format: MP3

$9.99
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5:23
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3:34
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4:28
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4:26
30
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2:38
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4:07
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3:35
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3:56
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3:01
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4:27
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4:15
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: August 19, 2008
  • Release Date: August 19, 2008
  • Label: Epic
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 43:50
  • Genres:
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • ASIN: B004GP5G6I
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (156 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #17,443 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 41 people found the following review helpful By William Merrill TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 26, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Songs For Silverman starts off with a twist - the punchy, busy (...) a sign that we're in for an interesting ride. The music that follows is vintage Ben Folds - epic piano playing, passionate vocals, dramatic melodies, etc. The lyrics do seem untypically restrained on occasion, as on the gentle and lovely "Gracie," but I'm thinking most BF fans will eat this CD up. Ben has been very prolific in the past year or so, with 3 solo EPs, plus the "Bens" EP, PLUS this new album. I'm grateful that the Silverman CD has minimal overlap with the EPs. When you add it all up, the five discs of tunes amount to a mighty fine collection of songs. Ben's melodies and piano lines are more rich than ever, deep into Elton John "Tiny Dancer" territory. (Folds has never shied away from the EJ comparison, and has covered "Tiny Dancer" often in concert.) He and his two primary bandmates, Jared Reynolds and Lindsay Jamieson, have made things sound even better with some Beach Boy style harmonies, and strings come in on a few songs to add poignancy. Mr. Folds' albums are the kind that I enjoy more and more with repeated listens, and I can tell this new one will be the same way.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Devin DiMattia on May 5, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This is probably the Ben Folds solo album that sounds the most like a Ben Folds Five album, right down to the new trio lineup, generous amounts of vocal harmonies, and studio banter. His utterly brilliant, no-holds-barred solo debut "Rockin' the Suburbs" definitely stands alone, and upon listening to "Songs for Silverman," it's pretty clear Ben doesn't want to try and top it. Instead, we get a collection of pleasant piano-laden tunes, which isn't a bad thing, but after the varied eclectisism of his online EP releases, you would think some of that might have transpired onto the LP. The only EP track that makes it onto "Silverman," "Give Judy My Notice," is also the most basic of the original EP compositions (why didn't he put "Cooler Than You" or "You've Got to Learn" on here instead?)

I ought to start talking about the positives of this album before I start getting bombarded with "not helpful" votes. :-) The songs themselves are excellent. Some of the more complex pieces like "Time" and "Late" merit repeated listenings. Opening track "Bastard" is one of the best tracks Folds has ever written. The aforementioned "Give Judy My Notice" gets a much-needed editing job, as well as the addition of slide guitar and beautiful background vocals. The only problem is the sequencing of the album, with the most immediate tracks kicking off the album and nothing in the second half seems to serve as a proper ending, unlike the one-two punch of "Fired" and "The Luckiest" off "Suburbs." For "Silverman," we're given "Time," a beautiful number featuring Al Yankovic on background vocals, and "Prison Food," which doesn't really leave you with much. At least you can always go back to the start and listen to "Bastard" again.

I also want to talk about the special edition package and enclosed DVD.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Pat Taormina on May 2, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This is yet another stellar change in direction for Ben, who shows a new and deeper facet with each passing album. Simply put, this album is well-produced and well-constructed, with two new background players (Jared Reynolds [bass] and Lindsay Jamieson [drums]), a DVD-sized package (if you get this edition), a bonus 40-minute DVD, and a whole new booklet of photography by Ben and his wife Frally. You'll also see familiar faces in the guest artists: Weird Al Yankovic, John Mark Painter, and Frally Folds.

For those of you thinking that a new bassist and drummer mean a return to the 90's and the return of a "Five," you're in for a shock. While Reynolds and Jamieson provide a magnificent background on instrumentation and vocals, their style differs drastically from the band of old. It isn't necessarily a bad or a good change, just different. This album also won't have the same dynamics as Ben's previous album (Rockin the Suburbs) or his EPs released in 2003 & 2004. As always, some will welcome the change and see it as a musician expanding his horizons and breadth, while others will not accept the fact that change is inevitable and view this as a possible betrayal of the old sound (hopefully, "Rockin' the Suburbs" and/or the EPs weeded these people out already).

The bonus DVD offers a look at the meanings of almost every song, extensive studio footage, live clips, Ben and his band watching the initial cut of the DVD, and even a look at the making of the "Landed" video. It's every music groupie or die-hard fan's dream: watch the making of the album, see the personality of the people, and get some behind-the-songs knowledge to wow your friends with.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By The Judge of the Value of all Entertainment & Art on May 1, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Not enough can be said about how terrible the DualDisc format is. I bought this CD the day it came out, and it would only play in my DiscMan. I tried it in my home stereo and two different computers. Only the DVD side is consistently functional. If a fan pays for music, that fan has a right to listen to it wherever and however he or she sees fit. It's pretty outrageous that, in an effort to curb piracy, Sony is selling a CD that won't play in such a huge number of units that it actually encourages people who would ordinarily buy the disc to just download it and burn a disc that will play properly. In my case, I tried to return this CD, and the store I purchased it from would not give me cash back, only store credit -- because the disc technically wasn't defective. In other words, the fact that it works so terribly is intentional. Bravo, record industry. I will never purchase a DualDisc album again, so if the goal here was to make more money, you missed the mark.

As for the music on this CD, I am pleased to report that it's wonderful. While this is definitely the quietest album by Ben Folds/BFF, and I enjoy an energetic rock song as much as the next guy, this is a step forward from "Rockin' The Suburbs," which was a fun but largely uninteresting pop record. Comparing "Bastard" -- with its horn accompaniment, changing drum rhythms, and biting lyrics -- to "Annie Waits," the opener on the last album, it's easy to see that Ben is moving back in a more creative and personal direction this time around. It's sort of an extension of the "Reinhold Messner" disc, this time from a middle-aged man. He's even returned to the drums/bass/piano attack of the old days, mostly ditching the electric guitar that permeated that last outing.
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