Prime Music
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Songs From a Somali City
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Songs From a Somali City


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, May 10, 1995
"Please retry"
$19.18

Amazon's Jamiila Store

Visit Amazon's Jamiila Store
for all the music, discussions, and more.

Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 10, 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Original Music
  • ASIN: B000000NSU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #951,273 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Jamiila
2. Laac
3. Dakhtar
4. Yaabint
5. Muumina
6. Ma Korto
7. Laiilaaf
8. Siina Miiri

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 27, 2005
Format: Audio CD
The Somalis have a long and rich tradition of poetry that deals with themes of love, clan relations, war, and kinship. In profane contexts, poetry was accompanied by music and minimal instrumentation that framed and accentuated its inherent melodies. These instruments typically never went beyond the daf (tambourine), kaban (ud from Lebanon and Syria), and taruumbo (flute). These are the same instruments used all over the eastern part of Africa like Kenya, the Sudan, and Tanzania, and tended to link, at least musically these parts of Africa with the Arab world. Along the coastal towns, however, one notices the introduction and use of non-African instruments such as the electric guitar, electric keyboard, and harmonium which was imported from India along with Bollywood films.

The compilation of songs on the album Jamiila comes to us from the town of Baraawe, about 120 miles South of Mogadishu near the Shebelle river. The inhabitants of this area tend to be more diverse than those in the North, and are considered to be a minority group in Somalia. The mixture of the population in this area is primarily of mixed Arab and African ancestry or Africans from Bantu origin. They typically speak Chimina (Bantu family), af May-May, Swahili, and some Arabic.

The CD itself can be divided into two main groups of songs. The first group contains Western-type instrumentation such as the guitar and electric keyboard and tends to rely heavily on the rumba beat. The second group is mostly a collection of songs reminiscent of traditional Sudanese songs, and tend to be more subtle, slow, and use much less instrumentation.

In the first group, the title song of the CD, Jamiila, comes to us first and introduces us to the love poetry of Somalia sung by Kuusow "Kurtunwaarey".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 1, 2005
Format: Audio CD
All of the "Original Music" releases from Africa are truly gems, wonderful recordings of real music on the ground in a cultural milieu. Jamiila is a particularly delightful and light-hearted selection. Instruments mostly include warm flute, kaban (a variety of stringed instrument - simpler than the oud, less exotic than the sentir), voice and YeS o YeS, CASIO. Casio in its most undisguised display. The casio doesn't appear on all tracks but where it is employed it is with the basic casio sound. The other tracks are rustic and simple, lovely. The context gives the casio employment a truly lofi appeal. My favorite track on this recording "Laac" is a soulful exchange between voice and flute, ryhthmic kaban strokes holding a tight beat for the languid bluesy exchange of voices. If something from the "Original Music" label comes your way, never pass it up if you are a true ethnographic music lover. You won't be disappointed!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category