Songs To No One

October 15, 2002 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
11:34
30
2
5:14
30
3
5:41
30
4
3:43
30
5
4:19
30
6
3:31
30
7
5:32
30
8
4:38
30
9
5:36
30
10
4:27
30
11
6:25

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 15, 2002
  • Label: Evolver Entertainment
  • Copyright: 2002 KnitMedia Inc.
  • Total Length: 1:00:40
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000S9AJI6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #147,452 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

It's probably a good bet that the majority of people who buy this CD are doing it because of the name Jeff Buckley.
Jl Metcalf
A cool historical piece with some interesting views into songs that developed into different animals as his career progressed.
Bachenstein
I'd say there's a reason that Mojo Pin and Grace are the only songs from this collection that he wanted to release.
UsedToLiveAlone

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Holly Evans Gray on January 16, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Before you read another review calling this album redundant and unenlightening, read a review that should banish all negative reviews to the farthest corners of your brain if the following suggestions are heeded.
First point: Song 2 "How Long Will It Take" alone makes the CD worth having.
With that said, proceed to second point for carefully crafted "listening suggestions." These suggestions are designed for the sole purpose of enhancing your appreciation and love for this and other Buckley albums.
Second point: This album is best left til dessert. It simply can't be written off by anyone who does not have more than passing familiarity with at least 3 of the 4 albums listed below. Listen to it after listening to 1) Grace 2) My Sweetheart the Drunk 3) Live at Sin-e 4) Mystery White Boy, in no particular order except for #1, Grace
Heeding these suggestions will result in a rich appreciation of the diversity and magic of Buckley's early work.
Mojo Pin (track 3)and both versions of Grace (tracks 5 and 11) provide a rare glimpse into both the studio and live evolution of 2 songs which would later become part of Grace, the only album released during Buckley's lifetime and a musical coup de gras of the highest order. This early version of Satisfied Mind, track 6, is also a true gem.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
48 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Jl Metcalf on March 8, 2003
Format: Audio CD
It's probably a good bet that the majority of people who buy this CD are doing it because of the name Jeff Buckley. I did. Of course there's no denying the incredible talent that Jeff gave us. But what this album did for me is to spark the fuse into learning more about the music of the extraordinarily versatile, Grammy-nominated Gary Lucas. What few may realize is that without Gary, there is no "Grace" or "Mojo Pin," as he is the creator of those hauntingly sweet musical notes (Jeff wrote the words). Although the song "Grace" from Jeff's solo LP is a beautifully polished studio version, this CD contains not one, but two earlier variants which exude a nascent energy not so evident on Jeff's solo album.
Although the song "Grace" is one of my favorite songs in the world, I actually prefer the two versions on "Songs to No One" because the raw tones of Gary's guitar and Jeff's voice sound much more vulnerable and passionate without such a full, heavy back-up orchestration. On the club Roulette live performance of Grace, Jeff starts out with an innocent little harmonica tune which seems to swiftly end in a minor chord which gently, but firmly captures the ear and immerses the soul into a musical orgy with those infamous first rifts of the song. I'm not particularly fond of the harmonica spotlights later found in the song, but for true lovers of "Grace," it's interesting to hear early launches of the song.
This version of "Mojo Pin," is refreshing because of its simplicity. I never realized how much the heavy bass and drums really weighed down this song on the album, "Grace." Jeff's voice is beautifully showcased, being impelled and kept lightly afloat by Gary's fluid whisperings of guitar. The end of the song is a bit raucous, but it feels like a welcome release of energy.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By T. Cook on October 20, 2002
Format: Audio CD
the saddest day in music for me was the day that jeff buckley died. we'll never know where he was going to take us with that voice. this cd is only able to offer us some more insight into where those places might have been. "hymne a l'amour" alone is worth a trip to the record store and the price of the cd. "harem man" is also a necessary addition to any buckley collection. the man had passion. the man had an incredible gift. this cd proves it once again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Gabriella West on October 16, 2002
Format: Audio CD
While this album has a sloppy, workshoppy feel, I have to say that it gives me lots of pleasure! It's nice to see Jeff looking adorable, young and androgynous in the photos (the booklet is nicely put together). Gary Lucas' willingness to experiment obviously gave Jeff a chance to work some melodies out, so this is a jazzier, more experimental Jeff Buckley than we've ever heard before. There's a kind of mellowness and humor in these songs, and little sense of the urgency, intensity and potential tragedy of records like Grace, and Sketches. It's Jeff before the myth took hold. Maybe he still had a sense of hopefulness about life and his future when he created these songs.
Particular standouts for me are "Hymne a l'Amour," which roams all over the place in an interesting way, "Song to no one," which does the same thing, "She is free," and "Harem Man." I enjoyed hearing the tentative early versions of "Mojo Pin" and "Grace." There's an emotional version of "Satisfied Mind" which doesn't have the piercing clarity and perfection of the version on "Sketches," but that's all right. The only clunker for me is "Cruel," which is a sort of morose heavy metal screamer.
This project was put together with love by Hal Willner, and it shows. Gary Lucas should feel proud too. He nurtured Jeff's rising talent and didn't get a lot back, but you can tell while listening to the songs that these two musicians had fun together, and that Gary gave Jeff a safe, supportive place to develop his vocal chops! To sum up, a good-hearted album that devoted Buckley fans will want to add to the collection.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?