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  • Sony PCM-M10 Portable Linear PCM Voice Recorder with Electret Condenser Stereo Microphones, 96 kHz/24-bit, 4GB Memory & USB High-Speed Port - Black
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Sony PCM-M10 Portable Linear PCM Voice Recorder with Electret Condenser Stereo Microphones, 96 kHz/24-bit, 4GB Memory & USB High-Speed Port - Black

by Sony
| 38 answered questions

Price: $199.99 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
  • Microphones Built-in mics: 1 Configuration: Stereo Type: Condenser (omni) External mic input: 3.5mmAudio quality Bit rate: 16/24 Sampling frequency: 44.1/48/96kHz Formats: WAV/MP3Outputs Headphone: 3.5mm Audio out: 3.5mmStorage and media Type(s): Micro SD Capacity: 16GB Hard drive 4GBConnectivity USB: YesOther Number of tracks: 2 (stereo) Phantom power: Not applicable Auto limiter: Yes Width: 2.48" Depth: 4.55" Height: .85" Weight: 4.1oz Battery type: AA x 2 Battery life (app.): 17 hours Built-i
3 new 10 used from $176.39 1 refurbished from $389.00

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$199.99 & FREE Shipping. Details Only 1 left in stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Sony PCM-M10 Portable Linear PCM Voice Recorder with Electret Condenser Stereo Microphones, 96 kHz/24-bit, 4GB Memory & USB High-Speed Port - Black + Sony Carrying Case for PCM-M10 Recorder + Joby GP1-A1EN Gorillapod Flexible Tripod (Grey)
Price for all three: $237.88

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

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Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 1 x 1 inches ; 1 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • ASIN: B002R56C4O
  • Item model number: PCMM10/B
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (77 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,336 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: June 17, 2003

Product Description

Yes, you can record premium audio anywhere! Isn't modern technology wonderful? Sony's PCM-M10 makes it possible to not only capture up to 96kHz digital audio, but you can stow your "rig" in your pocket! Just think — a few short years ago, you would've been lugging around a pretty massive recorder to get the same quality. That would've not only required a much more expensive recorder, but also a much bigger pocket! Everything you need is in here, from premium stereo mics to 4GB of flash memory to a built-in speaker to preview your handiwork. Oh, yes — you're going to want this one!

Customer Reviews

The mics are very sensitive and the sound quality is very good.
D. Weiss
That's an oversimplification, but the point here is that Sony equipped the PCM-M10 with a good DAC.
zilch0
Listening to the recordings, it really sounds like you're right there.
The Digital Trekker (B Stoops)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

165 of 166 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Berry on February 28, 2010
Verified Purchase
I had a Zoom H4n for about a week, and I returned it, and got the Sony PCM-M10. It ended up being a nice trade for me. The mics and preamps on the Zoom were fantastic, but the Sony's are as good, if not better, quality than the H4n. The H4n is a multi-tracker, and has XLR inputs, etc., making it a different type of device than the Sony, and the H4n was very large in the hand, making it a little too big for subtle hand-held recordings, and other situations where you don't want the recorder to be the center of attention. The mics on the Sony are fixed in place at 90 degrees, unlike the Zoom where you can change from 90 to 120 degrees with a twist function. I didn't change to the Sony necessary for the functionality as much as the form-factor. The Sony is compact and is a little more discreet, making it almost (visually) pass as an MP3 player in appearance. It is the same size as an iPhone, but a little thicker, and it feels nice and solid in the hand.

Another thing I might add is that in the description on this item page, the package contents aren't mentioned very thoroughly, so I would like to put them here. It comes in a nice looking box, and you are definitely buying the retail item as it ships from Sony, which includes everything that it is supposed to (the item page almost makes it seem like you are buying just the recorder itself).
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182 of 186 people found the following review helpful By Neil A. Chesanow on November 24, 2009
I'm a journalist who does interviews. I don't record "voice," much less music. I've used Sony's EV500 mono tape recorder--the high-end standard for print journalists--for over 20 years. My colleagues thought it was overkill to switch to stereo. When I showed them my new Sony PCM-10 (purchased in October 2009), they thought it was pretty cool, but when I told them the price, they thought it was too expensive (journalists are congenitally cheap; goes with the salary).

The PCM-10 lets you record in 10 modes, including uncompressed LPCM and compressed MP3, so we did a test recording (that is, an interview) in the highest-quality stereo mode: LPCM 96kHz/24 bit. Well! Let me tell you: Eyebrows arched. The sound was spectacular. One guy grumped--beforehand--that he didn't need interviewees to sound like Maria Callas. Mono was good enough. Then I played it back. He listened. He stroked his chin. "How much did you say that was?" he asked. Because, if you listen to a lot of recorded sound, you can clearly hear the difference.

The bottom line is this: If you record regularly--and seriously--whether it's rock concerts, garage bands, opera stars, birdsong, or interviewees, you want the best sound you can get. The PCM-10 delivers it.

There are many other things to like about this new Sony unit. It has a (mostly) aluminum case. I don't know about you, but I just hate cheap plastic cases. It's about the size of a deck of playing cards. The buttons and menus are so intuitive, I figured everything out without once cracking the manual (which, incidentally, is fairly well-written as these things go). The buttons and switches on the device are intelligently laid out and a cinch to master. And believe me, I'm no genius when it comes to this sort of thing.
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52 of 54 people found the following review helpful By John Smallberries on February 1, 2010
Somebody finally got it right. This recorder sounds great, with very low self-noise and wide frequency range from the internal mics. It is easy to setup, and super-easy to use.

Other reviews cover general features. Here are some remarks about stereo recording in particular:

Stereo recording:
The two built-in omnidirectional condenser mics give you nice stereo separation when the recorder is in the midst of a sound field. I was a little surprised, as you wouldn't expect to get decent stereo imaging from omnis so close together, it's why stereo recorders/mics typically use two cardioid pattern mics. The downside of cardioids is less sensitivity for low frequencies, whereas an omni will capture those lows. Sony has a neat trick here: the omnis are set into the body of the recorder, shielded from each other, so each effectively sees its own half of the room (plus reflections of the other half). You get a nice stereo separation (though not the kind of imaging that lets you pinpoint sound sources). And you get the wide, flat frequency response of omni microphones. If anything, the bass can be a little boomy when you're too close to a sound source -- and the recorder has a low-frequency cutoff you can switch on if you want to lose some of that low-end rumble. They are nice-sounding mics.

Using your own mics:
If you want to use your own microphones, you will need a female XLR to mini stereo cable (eg, Hosa 2' Right Angle Mini Stereo Male to 2 XLR Female Breakout Y-Cable) to plug them into the recorder. The recorder is advertised as having plug-in-power (eg, phantom power) for external mics.
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