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457 of 466 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sony PRS-300 "Pocket Edition": A Truly Excellent, Portable eReader
I rarely, if ever, write reviews for products, simply because I rarely find a product that dramatically exceeds, or fails to meet, its published description. The PRS-300 "Pocket Edition" ereader is a device that did provide a far better than expected experience.

One device with which I was previously as impressed was the iPod Touch, which I've found to be...
Published on September 20, 2009 by Chris C

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82 of 89 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Using it only for Library Books
I bought the Sony Reader Pocket Edition to use for my public library's downloads. I already own and LOVE my K2, but as a Librarian I just couldn't pass up using my public library's resources. Since I have the K2 buying the cheapest Sony Reader made sense since I just wanted to use it for borrowed books.

I do enjoy the navigation buttons and the layout. The...
Published on September 12, 2009 by JillyG


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457 of 466 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sony PRS-300 "Pocket Edition": A Truly Excellent, Portable eReader, September 20, 2009
By 
Chris C (San Francisco, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC (Camera)
I rarely, if ever, write reviews for products, simply because I rarely find a product that dramatically exceeds, or fails to meet, its published description. The PRS-300 "Pocket Edition" ereader is a device that did provide a far better than expected experience.

One device with which I was previously as impressed was the iPod Touch, which I've found to be simply one of the best consumer goods purchases that I've ever made. Funny enough, my principle use for the Touch was as an ebook reader, and it was the Touch's shortcomings as an ebook reader that eventually prompted me to purchase the Sony PRS-300 "Pocket Edition".

I read extensively, both on my work commute (1.5 hours each workday on public transit), and in the evenings and on weekends. Conservatively, I probably read upwards of 20 hours each week, both ebooks and downloaded news articles and the like. I previously purchased the Sony PRS-505, in late 2007, and found it to be a good ereader. The PRS-505 provided a sharp, glare-free page image that was easy and relaxing to read. Unfortunately, it was a bit delicate, and within a few weeks of purchasing I had managed to drop it (from only about 2.5 feet) and crush the upper corner, dislodging the power slider. After having it fixed under warranty, I held onto the PRS-505 until mid-2008, when I purchased an iPod Touch. I read on the Touch, and--briefly--on the Amazon Kindle 2, until I purchased the PRS-300.

The new PRS-300 "Pocket Edition" over-comes several of the short-comings of the Sony PRS-505 and Amazon Kindle 2:

1. Great form-factor: The PRS-300 really will fit in a pocket, either a jacket pocket or very comfortably in a pocket of my cargo shorts on the weekend. This is an improvement over the PRS-505, which always seemed either slightly too big (to fit in a jacket pocket, or anything short of backpack or my briefcase), or not quite large enough (to read work PDFs with charts and graphs, or more structured documents, like instruction manuals. The PRS-505 and the Kindle 2 were also awkward to tote by hand (which is why I dropped the PRS-505, while trying to get my mail). While the Pocket Edition won't display large, structured documents either, you recognize this as a trade-off for this model, in favor of its truly convenient size. It's perfect for books, news articles, blog posts and the like, and, not having to carry it by hand or in bag, I take it with me more often when I'm out, and use it more than either the PRS-505 or Kindle 2.

2. Excellent ergonomics: The PRS-300 simply feels great in the hand: it has excellent balance, and a really comforting heft that reminds me of the way a solid paperback book just rest in your hand without the need to consciously grasp it, or constantly adjust it. This is a true improvement over both the PRS-505 and the Kindle 2; both of these devices were very, very light, which in consumer electronics is usually the Holy Grail of product design, but neither was particularly well-balanced and I was always conscious of having to exercise control of the device, especially when clicking the page-turn buttons. The Pocket Edition isn't by any means heavy--it's actually a lighter than both the PRS-505 and the Kindle 2, at about 7.5 ounces--but the smaller form-factor, coupled with its superb balance, allows you to comfortably fade into your reading, without the physicality of the device intruding. While that kind of device transparency was a stated goal of the Kindle, I have to admit that I only rarely was able to read with the Kindle 2 without it intruding in some way (usually to re-balance it in my hand). The Pocket Edition has only one page-turn button--the large round navigation pad in the bottom-center--but the pad is in comfortable reach of your thumb while holding the Reader on the side. The button is firm without being obtrusively difficult to press (which was often a failing I noticed on both the PRS-505 and the Kindle 2). Of all the things that I enjoy about the Pocket Edition, its truly comfortable, unobtrusive physical design is probably the stand-out quality.

3. More durable design: The PRS-300 is, like the iPhone, or iPod Touch, or your laptop, a piece of consumer electronics that you simply don't want to drop. Electronics are delicate (unless you spend ungodly amounts of money on Toughbooks and the like), and not tolerant of abuse. That said, the casing and design of the Pocket Edition is a very large step up from the PRS-505, which as I mentioned I managed to grievously injure with one (not very far) drop. I have "Whoops"-ed the Pocket Edition a couple of times, and was impressed that the more solid aluminum casing, coupled with the plastic end-caps and power slider, made it a great deal more resilient than its predecessor. In terms of durability, it's probably about comparable to the Kindle 2; the Kindle 2, though, at least from Amazon's marketing materials, does seem designed to "bounce back" from drops and falls that the Sony Reader was not made to withstand. In comparison with other ereaders on the market, the Pocket Edition is far sturdier, in terms of its heft, the resilient aluminum front buttons, and the (very) slightly elastic plastic end-caps.

4. Excellent screen image: The screen image of the Pocket Edition is crisp, clear, and CONSISTENTLY easy to read in both high- and medium-light conditions. The screen is non-glare, and there has been only one occasion (under somewhat harsh artificial light) when I needed to shift position slightly to remove a light-diffraction effect from the screen. The screen quality is comparable to the PRS-505, and considerably better than that of the Kindle 2. I'm somewhat puzzled by this, because there's only one e-ink technology on the market right now, and the manufacturers of the screens all license the same process, with the same quality control parameters (the parameters are part of the license agreement), so I don't really understand why the Kindle 2 screens seem to perform a notch or two below their competitors. I did read that Amazon made a decision to lighten the font image on the Kindle 2 (which owners of the Kindle 1 noted and complained about), so perhaps it's simply a software issue. However, I finally decided to ditch the Kindle 2 when I noted the screen image literally fading away in direct sunlight; this issue has been commented on by a number of users, and Amazon will happily provide a replacement Kindle for units that experience this. The Sony Pocket Edition, though, has provided a much crisper screen image, with noticeably darker fonts, a whiter (lighter) screen background, almost no glare, and no funky fades, distortions, or other effects that inhibit reading. The clarity and comfort of reading the screen image is as good as (and sometimes better than) that of a physical book.

5. Very good on-device interface: The on-device interface of the PRS-300 is straight-forward, uncluttered, and relatively easy to navigate. Since the Pocket Edition (unlike the PRS-505, the Kindle 2, and the new Sony PRS-600 Touch Edition) does not include an MP3 player and image viewer, the Pocket Edition's interface is strictly for book navigation and the better for it. It does take a click or two more than it "seems" like it should to access a book, or navigate to a specific goal, but I've decided that this expectation is formed largely from our use of personal computers (and iPod Touches/iPhones), which provide an instantaneous response (unlike e-ink) and the possibility for much more flexible menu designs (a virtue that the PRS-600 Touch Edition captures to some extent with its touch-screen). In comparison with the PRS-505, or the Kindle 2, the on-device interface of the Pocket Edition is at least as simple/easy to use, and perhaps slightly better, since it doesn't have music, image, browser, text-to-speech, etc. options. The on-device interface is very good, and given the technology, it's only the adoption of the touch-screen that will likely improve on it.

6. Acceptable Sony Library software: The Sony Library software has always reminded me of Apple iTunes: It's slower than it should be, less intuitive than it could be, less flexible than its competition, and usually at least slightly frustrating. On the most basic level, as a tool for transferring content from your PC/Mac to the Reader, the Library software meets its goal; the software is, though, always slower than it "seems" like it should be. Like iTunes, it makes you wonder why it takes twice as long to transfer a file than it would through Windows Explorer/Mac Finder, and ask, "Why can't a large consumer electronics company like Sony (and Apple) do better?" The Library's short-comings are especially puzzling when you consider that there is a free software program, Calibre, designed by an ardent ebook enthusiast, that does more than the Sony Library, faster, more intuitively, less obtrusively, and without regularly freezing. I use the Sony Library for my Sony-purchased content, and Calibre for my personal content. If you have personal, non-DRM content, I can't recommend Calibre highly enough (did I mention it's free?); additionally, Calibre provides extensive, easy-to-use news media feeds, which it will painlessly transfer directly to your Reader, from both newspapers and news magazines. If you do decide to use Calibre, please consider making a donation; it's truly a masterful program that is continually up-dated and improved. The Sony Library itself, however frustrating it can sometimes be, isn't a reason to reject the PRS-300. The Library software does its job, and is reliable and improving. The local library finder is a great new feature, and one that--finally--has me using my local library for ebooks, rather than continually purchasing them. When I first read the press releases for the new Sony Readers, I discounted this feature, but quickly (as in the course of a weekend) realized that the ability to read library ebooks is a feature that I will use more frequently.

It should be said that the Kindle 2, which foregoes a software interface with your PC/Mac in favor or an online library, truly enjoys an advantage over other ereaders; the Whispernet feature of the Kindle 2 (which was mimicked on the iPod Touch by the Touch's WiFi access) is the only one that I vaguely miss. Of course, I don't miss Amazon reaching into my Kindle and deleting MY content, from both my device and online library. As internet-based data storage expands in consumer electronics, I have really come to appreciate the advantages of having my personal content available to me off-line and distanced from vendors/service providers. When it comes down to it, I don't have any need for book content always-on-demand, such as is offered by the Kindle; that's a nice feature, but one that caters solely to a almost pathological consumerist tendency for instant gratification. I buy fewer books without that feature, and enjoy my books more (and persevere longer with books that don't immediately engage me).

The Sony PRS-300 "Pocket Edition" is honestly one of perhaps only 2 or 3 consumer electronics purchases that I've ever made that make me sit back and say, "Wow, I'm really glad that I bought this." The Pocket Edition is like one of those books that you begin reading, and after a few chapters pause, and smile, and get the slight rush that comes from true enjoyment. As I mentioned, the iPod Touch was one of the very few devices that gave me similar enjoyment, but the eye strain that came from reading from an active LCD screen was simply not worth the convenience of the device's form factor. I have, too, really begun to appreciate the slightly larger screen on the Pocket Edition, and enjoy the "muscle memory" experience of my eyes scanning across a screen that's almost the same size as my favorite old paperback books.
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121 of 122 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great For Recreational Readers, Students / Researchers Should Get the 600, October 9, 2009
This review is from: Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC (Camera)
I never thought I would ever embrace digital books, but I think this reader has forever changed that. Every concern I had about an eReader was addressed.

Readability: It's 'just' like reading on paper. In fact it took me all of about 20 minutes to realize that I actually prefer it to paper. With paper books you get shadows, you have to angle the book depending on which side of the pages you're reading on, etc. Here, the ambient light is distributed evenly by the material on the screen so the text is easy to read. And there is little, if any, noticeable glare or reflection. Some people dislike the lack of a backlight, but I actually prefer it because its much less stressful on the eyes. The background is a soft white color thats very easy on the eyes. You can resize font to your preference. The 3 sizes available here are plenty. Its especially great for incredibly nearsighted people like me who like to take their glasses off when they read and not have to squint. between all of this, it makes for a very comfortable reading experience. I can read much faster on this device than on paper. I guess if I had to nitpick, the only thing thats distracting is the silver finish of the device itself, which actually reflects more light than the screen. If you think this could be an issue for you, I'd recommend a darker color.

Usability: Its a breeze. Its incredibly easy to use, and everything is very plainly labeled. Turning pages, bookmarks, and zooming are all performed with single button presses. Your library is organized alphabetically of course, so just navigate ansd click. It also remembers your place for you, and in addition you can create your own bookmarks. While in a book you can use the numbers on the side of the screen to key in a specific page number. Its just the right weight, and it feels just right when you're using it. The software is very iTunes like in both appearance and function. It generally works as it should, though I find it a bit slower than I'd prefer when performing functions of browsing the Sony eBook store. One function I was surprised was missing was the lack of ability to edit file info in the software; if you get an eBook thats incorrectly labeled there's really no way to fix it in the software.

What I've found is that its best to bypass the software entirely...Windows (and probably Mac as well) recognizes this as a mass storage device so you can put all your content on the reader using Windows Explorer or Mac Finder. MUCH faster. You can transfer books via drag n drop in seconds as opposed to minutes using the software. You can download Google books directly from Google (easier to browse) and drag them to the 'books' folder.

Content: a TON of it. I find the Sony store to be a bit too pricey though. The bestsellers are pretty reasonably priced but everything else costs just as much as its paper counterpart, so if you're looking to save money on paperbacks and such buying this...hold off for now until the prices drop, if indeed they ever do. The best thing is the integration with Google Books. Granted, its all 'older' stuff but there's a lot of great classics on there that should be in everyone's library. It also dispays .txt .doc and .pdf files, so you can make your own content. For example, if you use the Firefox browser and have the PrintPDF add-on installed, you can literally print any page to a pdf and transfer it to the Sony for much for comfortable reading. For example...your local news website or magazines? :) It also supports the epub format and allows digital library checkouts. Unfortunately no library in my area supports this as of yet, but I'm hoping they do soon. This could revolutionize the concept of the library...for better or for worse. As far as storage, again some have griped about there being 'only' 512 mb of storage (only 440 mb is usable). When you consider most ebooks are 1 or 2 mb in size, this allows you carry 300 - 400 books around. I dont know about you, but ive never needed access to that many books at once in my life. But if thats an issue, look elsewhere.

So that's my breakdown of the device itself.

Backing up a bit...the big decision I had to make was whether which model to get; Kindle, the Sony 300 or the 600. The big drawback with Kindle is DRM. It seems like a very controlled and locked down system. Sony supports many more open formats. Plus I don't care about wireless...it drains the battery quicker and I want to spend as little time charging a reading device as possible. Plus, as I said, 300 - 400 books are plenty for me to carry around. As far as readability, the Kindle screen looks bigger, but the amount of reading space is almost identical between this and the Kindle 2. Kindle uses more screen space for displaying battery life, etc...where as the Sony uses literally the entire screen. I also found the Kindle's font looked more thin and 'computer' like, whereas on the Sony, the font is nice and thick...looks almost identical to the fonts you'd see on paper.

So then the decision was between the touch screen 600 and this model. Without getting too much into it, I'll simply put it like this: If you are a student or researcher, get the 600. It has a built-in dictionary (the 300 does not), a word search function, the ability to make notes, scribble on pages, and it has greater (upgradeable) storage. The 600 also has mp3 support. While these features are neat, for someone like me who reads for entertainment, I found them kind of pointless or unnecessary. Also, the touch screen model has more glare than the 300, and the screen seems dimmer, probably due to the touch layer. For what I want to use it for, the 300 gives me a better experience and the contrast is much better for easier reading.

I don't think I will ever give up paper books, but from now on most of my recreational reading will be done on this device. Sony did a fantastic job of blending old with new, and once you start using one yourself you too will be hooked. A fantastic, and revolutionary electronic device!
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42 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The ideal ebook reader for me, February 1, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC (Camera)
I did a lot of research before I decided to buy the PRS-300. Initially I was set on the PRS-600 due to the extra features, including the touchscreen. After reading lots of reviews and doing some soul searching, I realized that the smaller brother, the PRS-300 is actually the perfect ebook reader for me. I will also mention that this is my first such device and I've been wanting one for a long time.

What drove me away from the PRS-600 (which otherwise has a whole bunch of useful extra features) is the fact that the screen isn't as clear as the PRS-300 due to the extra layer for the touchscreen. In fact, the PRS-300 supposedly has the best and most contrasty screen of any reader currently in production. And this is the main reason that finally decided it for me. I want my reading experience to be as close to reading a book as possible.

To those who complain that this reader is missing a wireless connection I will say this: you are a bit misguided my friends. In fact, I wouldn't have bought this reader if it had a wireless connection (like the Kindle). A book doesn't have wireless and it works just fine. I don't want to have the surprise to find my books deleted remotely. In fact I love the fact that I can connect my reader to my computer with a cable whenever I want to. Once I load my books on it, a long time will pass before I wish to fiddle with them again. And no, I don't read news on the device. Strictly books.

The device itself is very elegant and well built. Even though the back is not metal (only the front is), the construction feels very sturdy and solid. It's a little bit weighty in your hand, but just enough to not feel flimsy. The first time you lay your eyes on it might be a surprise because the PRS-300 is smaller in person than in pictures. Just so you can get an idea, it has the same width as a classic paperback but it is about 1 inch shorter. I find it very easy to hold in one or two hands.

The buttons are very satisfying to click and I realized that I prefer to use them rather than a touchscreen that can get grimy from all the touching.

The lack of a expansion (SD) slot is not an issue. I've loaded over 22 books on it and I still have over 300 MB left. Those 22 books will probably require 2 years to finish since some of them are over 1000 pages in length. Space is really not an issue here.

The screen is very good but it could have been better. More contrast would be nice but the e-ink technology is still young. I don't mind the fact that it is only 5" instead of 6" because the resolution is the same as for the bigger model.

One other thing that could have been better is the speed of operation. Page turning is reasonably quick, and even though it's not instant, you will get used to the speed after a while. These days I don't even notice it. What would have been nice though is a slightly speedier processor. Some large books (1000+ pages) take a long time to load the first time but I assume that's because the device is trying to format the book for its screen.

Battery life seems adequate, although I haven't reached the claimed 7000-8000 pages with one charge. I've only fully charged the battery once though but on the first charge I must have read about 1000 pages before it gave out. I'm sure battery life will improve after a few charge/discharge cycles.

Another big issue with this reader is that the battery is not user-replaceable. Some people have stayed away from this reader due to this particular reason but I decided that the battery won't lose more than half its capacity in the next 2 years, by which time the device will probably be replaced by something modern anyway so it's really not such a big issue for me.

All these apparent negatives aren't enough for me to give it less than 5 stars because as I said at the beginning, I had researched the PRS-300 thoroughly before I took the plunge and I knew exactly what its limitations were.

2 more things I want to mention before ending this.

1. I didn't use Sony's software. I used the freeware Calibre instead. It's an awesome piece of software although it seems to have some bugs and it is a bit slow in operation.

2. Although Sony doesn't supply the PRS-300 with a wall charger, you can check around your home for a compatible one with a mini-USB plug. I found out that the charger for my Garmin Nuvi 350 GPS works just fine since it has a compatible voltage which is about 5V. A word of warning here: do this at your discretion; I will not be held responsible if you damage your reader by using a 3rd party charger. What worked for me might not necessarily work for you.
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82 of 89 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Using it only for Library Books, September 12, 2009
This review is from: Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC (Camera)
I bought the Sony Reader Pocket Edition to use for my public library's downloads. I already own and LOVE my K2, but as a Librarian I just couldn't pass up using my public library's resources. Since I have the K2 buying the cheapest Sony Reader made sense since I just wanted to use it for borrowed books.

I do enjoy the navigation buttons and the layout. The reader keeps track of how long you have until your book expires, and counts down the days for you - I love that. I am assuming all Sony Reader's have this function. The problem comes from the font sizes. With just three choices S,M,L and you use PDFs the Small gives the most accurate rendering of the page but then you really can't read it. Medium is better, but then since the screen is so small you are flipping pretty fast and it gets to be annoying, especially if you read fast. The Large? Well lets just say it only seems like there are a few words on the screen at a time. I currently use the Medium mode, and am just dealing with the constant flipping (the speed of the screen updating is similar to the K2).

EPUBs are different. The rendering is just plain weird in anything above using the small font. The margins on the sides of the page are HUGE in Medium and Large and you wonder what is the point if the text to read in an EPUB is smooshed to the center? Half is wasted space. Then, I discovered with the EPUB, the way to read it in larger font is to open the settings and change the orientation to "horizontal" which only works for me when using EPUBs and not the PDFs. In summary of the EPUBs - it is great if you like the small font in the vertical position, anything larger it is best to change the setting to the horizontal.

Once last thing I just discovered which is strange. Maybe it is just user error that I need to work on. I legally belong to two libraries. I work in a different area which allows me to use and register a card at their library in addition to my home library. After downloading two books from one library's website which opened fine and I could read before, I downloaded an EPUB from the different library. Now I can not access the original two files. Either it doesn't allow you to download from different libraries with their software OR the little stinker is hosed and I have to figure out a way to fix this.

Overall it is a decent reader if you don't mind small font and you have never touched a Kindle before. I love the idea that you can use it with libraries but since so much screen space is wasted on just blank space, eh... I just don't know. I guess I am just going to have to try the Plastic Logic reader next and see what happens. I can keep hoping though, that one day I can happily use my public library!
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37 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Device!, September 28, 2009
By 
This review is from: Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC (Camera)
I bought the Sony reader mainly because I didn't like the keyboard on the Kindle. I have no problem having to hook my reader up to my PC to get a new book downloaded, so the Amazon Whispernet feature didn't appeal to me, either.

I just finished reading my first book on the device and I have to tell you that I didn't even notice that I was reading on an electronic device. The only thing that was strange was the inherent flashing that occurs when you turn the page, but that's the e-ink technology at work. A small price to pay. The page turns were fast enough to keep up with my reading, so this was no problem for me.

The menus on the device are simple to use and intuitive. I like the fact that I can be reading multiple books at once and it remembers my place in all of them. I can have multiple bookmarks, as well, so that's a nice feature.

All-in-all, I love the device. The only reason I gave it 4 stars on features was because it doesn't have a search function. But, I accept this because there is no keyboard, which I stated above is something I didn't want.

All of the low ratings I've seen so far come from people who are reading PDFs on the device. I can't speak for the PDF quality as I don't use mine for that purpose. I buy books from the Sony eBook store and I plan to get some from other free sources (ePub), as well.

The construction of the device feels sturdy. I don't plan on dropping it to find out, but is well-balanced in my hands. One-handed reading is not a problem, either.

If you're looking for an inexpensive device to read books on, this is the one. Because it's Sony, I trust that it'll be around for awhile.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice little device... but some issues, October 6, 2009
By 
Sean (New York, NY) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC (Camera)
I've been using ebooks since the Rocket Ebook was sold in the late 90's. I was ready for an upgrade, and it was a really tough choice. It came down to a refurbished Kindle 2, or a Sony Reader. Here is my breakdown...

Refurb Kindle 2
================
(+) Wireless downloads
(+) much better design than kindle 1
(+) 6" screen
(-) Kindle store too "closed"
(-) PDF Support (font issues, transfering to device etc)

Sony PRS-300
=============
(+) Good PDF Support
(+) While screen is only 5", its the same 800x600 resolution as the other devices
(+) Good price for new device
(+) Very compact and light
(-) 5" screen
(-) No wireless downloads

Sony PRS-600
=============
(+) Good PDF Support
(+) Touch Screen
(+) 6" screen
(-) No wireless downloads
(-) Glare on touchscreen is horrible

It was a tough decision. I almost got the refurb Kindle 2, but decided I didn't want to be locked into the Amazon store for downloads. The Sony model is more open, and you can use any Epub on the device directly. So I went with the PRS-300 and I'm pretty happy. Biggest issue has been the Sony Ebook Library 3.0 software is horrible. Don't even bother installing if you use Vista... install ver. 2.5 instead. The screen is great and the price was right.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Durable PRS 300 (Pink), November 6, 2009
By 
Twinszz "twinszz" (Memphis, tennessee United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC (Camera)
I have had my Sony Digital Reader for about two weeks now. I researched this and the Kindle. The biggest turn off with the Kindle was the price and strict limitations on where the books could come from.

I finally decided to try the Sony Digital Reader. The construction of it is awesome. I have dropped it twice. The first time while stanind on a linolium floor. No problems and it wasn't in a case. The second time I dropped it (in the case it came with), it fell on concrete. It reset to the prior setting. Meaning, the prior download of books I had. It wiped about 50 books off. There was an extremely small dent in the right front corner. No other problems what so ever. I simply re-downloaded the books wiped off.

A negative for me is the Sony e-library. It freezes and is a pain to get the titles or authors just right. Suggestion: If the downloads are from another source, simply rename the title or author as you wish so that they will display alphabetically.

The reader displays even better than the page of a book in just about any lighting situation. Laying down reading with one hand or eating and reading with one hand is much easier than holding an actual paperback.

I use Calibre to organize my reader. This takes longer as the reader does not automatically sync with Calibre, but, it does with the Sony E-library.

I am concerned that the battery is only supposed to last for two years with a replacement cost of $125. Sony needs to get on the ball as I use my reader every day at least two hours a day.

I have christmas requests for readers from two family members and scores of people I meet in stores or restuarants.

I absolutely love my reader. The cost is high to me, however, it is worth it. If I go back to school I will get the Touch. I do not like restrictions, so Kindle won't do it for me.

Also, the formating. I have mostly read PDF's, which do tend to put a word or two together on each page. Yes, there are only 3 font sizes, however, they are sufficient for those with average sight.

I give this reader 4 stars due to the battery issue and the software issues. Other wise, it would be perfect.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars once again impressed with Sony, December 11, 2009
By 
This review is from: Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC (Camera)
I just purchased the Sony Pocket Reader (PRS-300) today from a local retailer, and so my review is perhaps a bit early, however I wanted to speak to the software concerns voiced by other reviewers. I was nervous about buying the unit because I wanted to be sure I could read the ebooks I have already purchased over the last couple of years. (I've used my computer for several years to read ebooks). My ebooks are all in Adobe protected pdf format, not epub.

I installed the Sony software, but as it turns out I didn't need to. When I connected the reader to my computer and opened Adobe Digital Editions, the reader was detected. I was asked if I wanted to authorize it with my Adobe account, which I did, successfully and quickly. The Sony Reader then appeared in the left column of Adobe Digital Editions and I was able to simply drag and drop my purchased ebooks onto the reader. And, they opened on the reader!! Painless. A miracle, really. I expected a hassle, but was pleasantly surprised.

I will purchase future books in .epub format, because I suspect they will 'fit' the reader better, but I am thrilled to have my current books on the reader.

This ability to use books purchased from multiple sources is why I chose Sony over the Kindle. And my wife convinced me that the form-factor of the Pocket Reader would be better than a larger unit, and having used it a while today, I must agree with her. It is very easy to hold and operate, certainly easier than holding a book.

Perhaps the reader will disappoint me somewhere down the road, but initially, I am very impressed!
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great little reader with some unexpected surprises!, April 20, 2010
By 
Scott Hicok (San Luis Obispo, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC (Camera)
To be completely honest I purchased this reader because it was cheap and small. I have a phone that allows me to browse the web, GPS, and listen to music, so I wanted one thing from my reader - READ BOOKS! For that purpose this reader is perfect. The screen is great with no glare problems ever, and the device feels solid without being bulky. Unlike an iPad that my roommate has, I feel comfortable holding it in one hand for long reading sessions.

THE GOOD SURPRISES
A program called "calibre" is the greatest thing ever made. It's software that collects material from all over the internet and puts it on your reader. It has a news function that will automatically download just about any news magazine or paper and put it on your reader. Its very simple - every morning I run calibre, click the "fetch news" button, plug in my reader, and it puts the current editions of whatever stuff I want on my reader. For me, this is the NYTimes, CNet news, PC mag, and USA Today. Its completely free! and it also helps find free books online, I have a few Mark Twain and Dickens Novels on mine.

The reader also reads PDF and Word Doc files, which was a pleasant surprise.

It's called a pocket reader, and unlike the Kindle and Sony Touch Reader, it DOES actually fit in my back pocket.

THE BAD SURPRISES
Sony software is lame, not terrible, but simple not up to par with amazon. Yes you can find just about any book that you want, and yes, they are priced reasonably close (sometimes better) than amazon. But the software and store just aren't quite as good. The search function doesn't work well, for example if you can't spell an authors name correctly, like I can never do with Chuck Palahunick, it doesn't find what you're searching for. This is not a deal breaker, but kind of a pain in the butt.

The reader doesn't turn itself off, or have a sleep mode, so don't forget that or your battery will run out. On the plus side, battery life is excellent.

OVERALL
If you want a device that is portable and only for reading this is perfect. If you like news and magazine then with calibre it is simple the best thing on the market. However, if you want more options, like music or downloading via 3G than Kindle is the way to go (but you'll never ever get a free newspaper or magazine!).

Happy Reading!
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you are looking for an Ebook reader solely for reading Ebooks with no fluff or extras, you can't get much better., December 12, 2009
This review is from: Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC (Camera)
My tag kind of explains it all really, but here is a more in-depth breakdown for you.

The Sony Pocket eReader is one of the cheaper eReaders you can buy. To make it cheap there is a lack of many of the basic features you will find in other eReaders. You can't search for text, add notes, there is no G3 or wi-fi support, the screen is 5" instead of the typical 6", AND there is no touch screen.

So why would I give this device a 5 out of 5? Simple, if you want a solid as heck eReader that is affordable, has wonderful text clarity and contrast, and supports a very wide variety of documents for use instead of proprietary software, then this little device is perfect for you. The Pocket Reader doesn't have as many shades of grey as the Kindle 2 does, so the Kindle 2 is better with pictures, however because the screen resolution is the same and the Pocket's screen is smaller the text tends to look a little sharper. Both are just as easy to read as the other.

The Nook is another solid device in terms of eReaders, but it drains batteries comparitively fast when compared to the others out there and good luck trying to get one. It also doesn't support the wide variety of file types the Sony series does.

If you are someone who likes to read books and only wants a device that is very good at delivering that experience with a solid feel, ease of use, and extremely nice display for font that is extremely easy on the eyes, then this little beauty will treat you right. The down side, other than the extra bells and whistles, is that Sony doesn't pack in an AC adapter with the device and you have to charge it with a supplied USB cable (or get an adapter for an extra $30), and even though the solid little machine feels tough as all get out, I would definitely not trust it to survive a 3 foot fall onto a hard surface without getting damaged.
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Sony Reader Pocket Edition Silver PRS-300SC
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