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Southern Fried Women Paperback – August 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Satya House Publications; 1 edition (August 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1935874071
  • ISBN-13: 978-1935874072
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.9 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,017,606 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Southern Fried Women features a selection of short stories with an extremely strong Southern voice. Author, Pamela King Cable, has a definitive style that is both appealing and a pleasure to read. She created characters that are compelling and skillfully drawn, making the reader want to learn more about them. Cable's voice rings through, without being intrusive or overwhelming. Her characters speak naturally and seem true to their age, setting, time period and personality. Cable's Southern voice and appealing writing style is sure to appeal to readers. --Writer's Digest

Cable does a good job of portraying Southern women as strong, determined, and family oriented. Whether a Beach Baby or a Mobile Home Queen, the Southern woman is a survivor. --ForeWord Magazine

Pamela King Cable is one of those infrequent writers who can bring reality to fictional characters so strong that you'd swear you had encountered them in your own life's history. Southern Fried Women will leave the reader looking forward to more from this accomplished, imaginative, skilled, and entertaining author! --Midwest Book Review --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Author

One warm Carolina day, I said to a certain young woman of mine that the average Yankee man knows as much about a Southern Fried Woman as a cat knows about God's plan of redemption.

"What's a Southern Fried Woman? Lord, Mom, where d'you come up with that?"

I'm great at embarrassing my kids.

So I explained . . . while she sat and dutifully listened, as always.
A Southern Fried Woman's family and friends laugh at her dreams. But Southern Fried Women have learned not to boil over about it and make a mess. They fry all the criticism out of their heads, admiring and tasting the occasional golden brown results . . . when nobody else does.

Boiling it down, they're women born below the Mason-Dixon line and range in age from sixteen to ninety-six. They're not only fried, they're burnt out on empty promises, dead-end jobs, junk cars, making ends meet, and cheating husbands. Southern Fried Women are what Faith Hill, Loretta Lynn, and Patty Loveless sing about. Patsy Cline, Marshall Chapman, and the Judds are fine examples of Southern Fried Women.

Not being perfect, Southern Fried Women live to love again, believing the next set of dreams won't give out.

For years, Southern Fried Women have fled northern cities like Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, New York City, and Chicago. They escape the bitter cold of bad relationships and weather and return to the peace they once thought was boredom. They travel back to a life they once ran away from to achieve dreams that over time turned into nightmares.

Searching for the comfort of their roots, the Southern Fried Woman packs her car, her kids, and sometimes her husband, and heads home. Home to the "hollers" and coal towns of West Virginia and Kentucky, the Blue Ridge and beaches of Virginia, and the North Carolina Mountains and Outer Banks. The Low Country and battlefields of South Carolina whisper to her daily. Her eyes close and the plantations and bayou of Louisiana flash on her brain screen. The peach groves and rural dirt roads of Georgia call her in her dreams. Cotton fields and shrimp boats in Alabama invade her thoughts. The everglades, horse farms, and keys of Florida beckon. A vast river called the Mississippi winds through her memories. All roads lead to the Great Smoky Mountains and the back roads of Tennessee for some Southern Fried Women. The lakes, rivers, and farms of Arkansas reach out and pull her by the hand. The Southland draws her to a place she once called home, or to a new place that something reincarnated in her must find.

Before she reaches the Ohio River, she hears the call of the whippoorwill, the wind rushing through the tobacco fields, and the whir of the cicada. She feels the hot sun on her back, tastes the sweet tea of the local diner where she had her first date and the salty air of the barrier island beaches where she lost her virginity.

A Southern Fried Woman is fed up with promises of something better. She woke up to find she possessed the ingredients for a happy life a long time ago. She's let go of her pain, to hell with her pride. The dream was never any farther than her mama's back yard.

Southern Fried Women not only have all their eggs in one basket, they've fried them up with grits and gravy, hot buttered biscuits, and a pound of bacon and don't give a damn who knows it. Southern Fried Women can't stand to eat alone. When they cook a mess of beans, they want to eat them with a mess of people. But they've been experts at drinking alone.

A Southern Fried Woman knows life is not about how fast you run, or how high you climb, but how well you bounce. They keep away from skunks, lawyers, and people who've been mean to them and learned a long time ago you can't unsay a cruel thing. A Southern Fried Woman's path has had some puddles. They've washed a lot of mud off their faces.

They're not frail and they don't swoon. Southern Fried Women are about as fragile as a pack mule. After all, their mamas taught them how to wash laundry in a Hotpoint on the back porch, hanging miles of wet, heavy sheets and to pray the rain holds off. They iron their own clothes and can do their own hair and nails. They've been preached to, lied about, screamed at, broken, bruised, and just plain FRIED. They never give up; they just go home.

So you ask me, what is a Southern Fried Woman?

She's any woman brave enough to start over again, darlin', never gives up her dream, wherever she decides home is.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
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14%
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See all 14 customer reviews
I look forward to reading more from her in the future.
Amazon Customer
With a clear Southern voice and a remarkable gift of storytelling, Pamela King Cable has crafted a masterful collection of short stories.
Beth Hoffman
I really enjoyed reading each story and never wanted to put them down till they were done.
Scarlet Paolicchi

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on August 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
Southern Fried Women: A Collection Of Short Stories showcases the storytelling talents of Pamela King Cable. A history of bigotry in a local diner is the subject in "Pigment of my Imagination"; A woman lives in the land of doublewide trailers and works an interstate flea market in "Vernell Paskins, Mobile Home Queen"; a pregnant woman is lost, alone, broken down on a deserted road, and in labor in "Cry"; a stranger arrives in town after a women's prayer group hears angels sing during a violent coal mine strike in "Coal Dust On My Feet"; a woman struggles with the decision to keep her unborn baby in "Punkin Head"; a dead woman reveals that death is not the end of existence in "The Homestead"; a single mother discovers why her young son despises their one-Sunday-a-month guest in "Old Time Religion", two Pentecostal young ladies shed their cotton dusters for bathing suits, makeup, and a good time at Carolina Beach in "Beach Babies"; grief shows up some thirty years after a woman forgets her best friend in "No Time for Laura". Set in various locations and time periods in the American south, these are compelling and entertaining stories of forgiveness, death, love, discover, racial conflict, faith, tragedy, innocence, destiny, guilt, and overcoming obstacles. Pamela King Cable is one of those infrequent writers who can bring reality to fictional characters so strong that you'd swear you had encountered them in your own life's history. Southern Fried Women will leave the reader looking forward to more from this accomplished, imaginative, skilled, and entertaining author!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on October 6, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book of short stories is a treat to read! If you love the picture on the cover, you will be happy to see each story starts with a photograph and an introduction from Pamela King Cable explaining her inspiration for the story. I am a huge fan of old photos, so the photos really spoke to me. I found it interesting to get into Pamela's head and see how each character and their story was born. It made the characters and their stories very real to me.

The stories are very unique. These are not all feel good, sugary stories. These Southern Fried Women have not had easy lives. They are tough women battling problems some of us can only imagine. In the end, they overcome and stand tall.

Some of these stories are dark and disturbing as Pamela even warns us about in the introduction to one such story, Old Time Religion. I found myself gasping and thinking about many of these stories long after I read them. On the flip side, some of the characters had me laughing out loud at their thoughts and antics.

I highly recommend this book of short stories. Pamela King Cable is a wonderfully gifted storyteller! I look forward to reading more from her in the future. If you are a fan of Southern fiction, you will enjoy these stories.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Scarlet Paolicchi on November 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
I love the intros before each story giving me a peek into the author's mind. It is almost like a mini author interview. I really enjoyed reading each story and never wanted to put them down till they were done. I liked all of her characters because they were so well described that you got a great feel for them and they really evoked an emotion whether empathy, admiration, or disgust. I say big thumbs up!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lucy Adams on August 13, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In the south, we'd fry air if we could catch ahold of it. And the women in these stories almost have. Each short story, inspired by real life in the south, is about a complex woman shaped by her culture and environment. These women are not so different from others, except in the way their geographical placement makes them so.

Each story is a quick, enjoyable read that lingers in the reader's mind, working through the details, long after finished. You will be transported.

Lucy Adams, author of If Mama Don't Laugh, It Ain't Funny
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By GMR on December 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
Each story features a cast of strong southern women facing the trials of life the best way they know how....head on. They don't shy away from their circumstances no matter how rough and they're not afraid to get down and dirty if need be. There's also a dusting of the religious high road that many in the self proclaimed "Bible belt" take to heart but it's purely meant to show that by the grace of the powers that be, all things can be overcome. Take "Vernal Paskins, Mobile Home Queen"...our leading lady is having a hard time on life what with having to raise her daughter's child and a severe lack of funds, but a chance (or fated?) meeting with a traveling preachers wife leads to unexpected fortune both monetarily and spiritually.

The shortest story in this collection also happens to be my favorite amongst the lot....entitled "No Time For Laura". It literally brought tears to my eyes in its four page span while conveying the strong message of taking time to enjoy the smallest moments of happiness in life because you never truly know when they won't be there any longer.

It wasn't all sunshine and roses for me though as there were two stories in fact that no matter how I tried, I just could not get into for the life of me, but you know that's the beauty of short story collections. There are times when you fall in love with the whole lot and times where the love is few and far between. I'd say the odds presented here, two out of nine, are pretty good as a whole making this a collection I happily count among the "read".

In short, a book of short stories that gives readers a view on life with a Southern twang. They're not "nice" in the conventional sense of the word but they are real and emotionally charged. There is a purpose to the stories shared.
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More About the Author

Pamela is the author of the highly acclaimed collection of short stories, Southern Fried Women, a finalist in Fiction and Literature-Short Story, Best Books of 2006 Book Awards, USABookNews.com and a finalist for ForeWord Magazine's Book of the Year.

Born a coal miner's granddaughter and raised by a tribe of wild Pentecostals and storytellers, Pamela loves to write about religion and spirituality with mystical twists she unearths from her family's history. She has taught at many writing conferences, and speaks to book clubs, women's groups, national and local civic organizations, and at churches across the country.

More than a decade in the writing, Televenge, a novel about the dark side of televangelism, will be released in October 2012 by Satya House Publications.

www.pamelakingcable.com

Televenge book trailer http://www.televenge.com/trailer.html

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