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Sowing Atheism: The National Academy of Sciences' Sinister Scheme to Teach Our Children They're Descended from Reptiles Paperback – April 23, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Solving Light Books (April 23, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0970543859
  • ISBN-13: 978-0970543851
  • Product Dimensions: 0.3 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,920,844 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

In the current culture war over science education and the teaching of evolution, Bob Johnson's SOWING ATHEISM provides a unique and insightful perspective. In critiquing the National Academy of Science's (NAS) missionary evolutionary tract, SCIENCE, EVOLUTION AND CREATIONISM, 2008, he identifies their theft of true science by their intentional neglect of other valid scientific possibilities. Then using NAS's own statements, he demonstrates that the so-called great process of evolution, natural selection, is nothing more than a figure of speech. These chapters alone are worth reading the book. Next he shows how the NAS attempts to seduce the unwitting reader by providing scanty empirical evidence but presented with great intellectual bullying both secular and religious. He actually embarrasses the NAS with a long list of their quotes where they make the obvious claim that evolutionists believe in evolution. He then shines light on the Clergy Letter Project, again showing the obvious theistic evolutionists believe in evolution. Again, SOWING ATHEISM brings a unique perspective to an always interesting debate; advocates for both sides should find the book intriguing. The questions it raises are important; they deserve a hearing. --Don McLeroy, Chair, Texas State Board of Education

About the Author

Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr. holds a general science degree from West Point. He is the author of ATHENA AND EDEN, ATHENA AND KAIN, THE PARTHENON CODE: MANKIND'S HISTORY IN MARBLE, AND NOAH IN ANCIENT GREEK ART.

Customer Reviews

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Hypothesis which cannot be tested cannot be considered science.
Jamie Langlinais
The author has an occult agenda to further, and by the gods he did not let little things like sanity, honesty, and decency stand in his way.
Burrowing Owl
This book is, unfortunately, a treatise in deception, I would not recommend it to anyone.
Kevek

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

81 of 87 people found the following review helpful By Mork Twain on March 17, 2009
Read the book.
Welcome to the war on reason. Things are getting out of hand, here. Faith-based science has given us such wonders as the Inquisition and the papal repression of Galileo's contention that the Earth orbits the sun.
Science is a *process* folks: you observe phenomena, formulate a theory, try to disprove the theory. Mistakes get made. Eventually, mistakes get corrected. Faith-based "science" education is about as valid as faith-based diplomacy: A feature of Iran's and Bush's foreign policy. Very difficult to change a decision that God inspired. Mistakes inspired by God can't be mistakes, can they?
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67 of 73 people found the following review helpful By Kevek on March 17, 2009
Unfortunately, when searching for truth evidence is cold, hard, and tested. Everyone may believe what they want, but when they are trying to refute the scientific method or evidence with their beliefs it is an exercise in deception. Deception to themselves, and deception to everyone who will give them their ear.

This book is, unfortunately, a treatise in deception, I would not recommend it to anyone.
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61 of 69 people found the following review helpful By D. Linabury on March 17, 2009
This book is proof that the state of Texas is about to head back into a pre-Darwinian era. Texans might as well start putting mice in their mouths to solve toothaches. Seriously. It truly frightens me that people like "author" Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr. are being taken seriously.

Consider this passage:
"Imagine yourself standing in the administrative offices of your local junior high school. You are there to bring a forgotten lunch to one of your children. Two tall, forbidding men enter wearing black business suits with red-letter NAS (National Academy of Sciences) armbands. They sneer and brush past you. They ignore the receptionist and the other people working there, and head straight for the principal's office. Just as the startled educator looks up at the intruders, both slam their fists on his desk. In unison, they cry, "We represent infallible science. You must teach these children that they are descended from reptiles. It is impossible to disprove our findings, and wrong to challenge them; therefore, no other point of view will be tolerated."

So now scientists dress like identical twin Nazis, too? Really? This book is good for a laugh, then a tear as you realize that the state of Texas is seriously considering removing the teaching of evolution from schools. If successful, I expect Texas will begin unicorn hunts the following year.
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46 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Jamie Langlinais on March 17, 2009
This book, like most creationist pieces, attempts to equate science with democracy. The principle premise is that in order for science to flourish, all possibilities must be taught. However, this belief belies a profound and appalling misunderstanding of what science is.

Science is not a democracy. That is, theories and principles in science are not taught based on which are the most popular, or which can get the most "votes". Principles are based on study and experimentation. Hypothesis which cannot be tested cannot be considered science.

However, this book seems to know that it cannot make its case on such rational footing, and instead primarily resorts to fear-mongering to try and paint scientists opposed to creationism as unholy atheist with sinister hidden agendas. It attempts to depict an Orwellian future where the "science police" run schools and where free though is discouraged. I personally find this quite reprehensible, but I suppose an actual debate on the merits would be too close to science.
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126 of 157 people found the following review helpful By Gen. JC Christian, patriot on March 17, 2009
This book is inspired. No doubt the author, Robert Johnson, went down to the crossroads, fell down to his knees, and was touched by the spirit as he scratched out the thesis for "Sowing Atheism: The National Academy of Sciences' Sinister Scheme to Teach Our Children They're Descended from Reptiles." He gets all of the basics right. Scientists are after our children. They are tempting them away from Christ with their shiny baubles of fact and reason.

But even though I gave it five stars, I cannot say it is a perfect book. There is so much more Johnson could have done to illuminate the Academy's true motivation. It has to be more than simply a desire to promote atheism. There must be some kind of economic motivation as well.

It's a shame Mr. Johnson didn't look into ties between the Academy and the contraceptive industry. It's a natural alliance, evolution and immorality, and one has to wonder if that's why scientists are so bent on establishing a relationship between God's children and that most immoral of apes, the bonobo.

Bonobos engage in all the most sinful acts of sexual immorality, everything from "thingy fencing" to "tongue spelunking." They do it to keep peace inside their group. They do not handle strife in a godly way--it is not settled by punishment or execution--it is resolved by hot, wild, orgasmic, wicked, ape sex, fluid flinging orgies of disgusting primate love.

And that's what the contraceptive industry would like to see in human society. Free love, fornication, adultery are good for their bottom line.

Bonobos, evolution, the contraceptive industry, and the Academy: there has to be a link there somewhere. Perhaps Mr. Johnson could look into it in his next book.
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