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Space Cadet Hardcover – November 29, 2005


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; 1st edition (November 29, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765314509
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765314505
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.8 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,516,149 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The lively story of a group of boys--Matt and Tex, from Terra; Oscar, from Venus; Pierre, from one of Jupiter's moons; and others--who train to uphold the peace of the solar system. This account of their training and their subsequent adventures is good, colorful fiction by an author who can write it ably and entertainingly."
--Chicago Tribune on Space Cadet
"Throughout the story there is a constant stream of Heinlein's noted wit and satire, superbly told . . . The Hugo Award committee need look no further."
--San Francisco Chronicle on Glory Road

"Heinlein...wrote adventure stories grounded in credible scientific speculation. Even the wonderful stories collected here feature his trademark cool reasoning. . . .Superb stories - old friends, really - that are well worth the book's price."
--Booklist on The Fantasies of Robert A. Heinlein


"Good, colorful fiction by an author who can write it ably and entertainingly." (Chicago Tribune)

About the Author

ROBERT ANSON HEINLEIN (1907-1988) is widely acknowledged to have been the single most important and influential author of science fiction in the twentieth century.

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Customer Reviews

Best science fiction writer ever.
Patrick Gentry
Heinlein's belief always was that the backbone of America was the everyday person doing their job.
Lonnie E. Holder
Finally, it is a fun book to read!
Norman Strojny

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 52 people found the following review helpful By OAKSHAMAN VINE VOICE on February 10, 2006
Format: Hardcover
_I have heard this book dismissed as "just another space cadet story." Check the date of publication (1948), this is THE first space cadet story. It started the genre. I've also heard it dismissed as a "kid's book." A "kid's book" would not have stuck in my memory for four decades now and provided me with inspiration and a model when I most needed it. A "kid's book" wouldn't have inspired me to stick out high school and college physics and mathematics instead of just throwing in the towel. It was remembering the example of this book, and _Starman Jones_, that got me through Calculus. I just wish the rest of the world would have lived up to the high ideals expressed in these books....

_I recently reread this tale after many years. I was amazed at how "nondated" it was. Heinlein has a perfect description of cell phones and cell towers. Something else finally hit me too- this is where Gene Roddenbury got most of his ideas for Star Trek. Heinlein actuallly uses the term "the Federation." His Interplanetary Patrol is obviously the inspiration for Star Fleet with it's noble ideals, multi-cultural make-up (in 1948), it's commitment to keeping the peace, and it's 100 year record of keeping the peace (a phrase right out of Trek.) The importance of the Academy and its naval style of organization came from Heinlein, the Annapolis graduate. The way that the organization is entirely composed of officers and officers in training- that's also pure Star Trek. Heinlein wrote of all this almost 20 years before the television show aired....

_It used to bother me that the Heinlein that wrote this book and the Heinlein that wrote _Stranger in a Strange Land_ and all that came afterward seemed like two different men. I now think that I understand that too.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Detra Fitch VINE VOICE on October 31, 2006
Format: Paperback
Follow young Matt Dodson as he enters the academy in hopes of becoming a Space Cadet. Matt makes friends with Tex, who always has amusing tales about his Uncle Bodie, and a few others, as lessons are learned ... usually the hard way.

Space Cadets are the elite guard of the solar system. They accept missions others fear, take risks no others dare, and uphold the peace of the solar system for the benefit of all. (Much like the Jedi Order!) This novel will take you from Earth, to Mars, to Venus, and beyond. Matt and his friends are tested in the most severe and extraordinary ways that will change them forever, but still not prepare them for the alien treacheries that await.

**** If you have never read a novel by Robert A. Heinlein, then please keep in mind that this was written in the year 1948. The author renewed the copyright in 1975. I stress this because even though the story begins in July 2075, there are a few references to events that supposably happened in OUR past, such as the notation of the person who created the Patrol's Tradition who lived 1969 - 1996.

The fact that Robert A. Heinlein's novels are still being published today clearly expresses how outstanding readers find his science fiction novels. Once you read this, or any other novel by Heinlein, you will have no doubt as to how the man came about being crowned "The Master of Science Fiction". ****

Reviewed by Detra Fitch of Huntress Reviews.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By E. M. Van Court VINE VOICE on February 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover
In 1948, Heinlein wrote a book based on his (limited) military experience that pinpointed underlying cultural issues in the U.S. military that are still plaguing the Dept. of Defense after sixty years (despite the current lack of space-based Marines). No spoilers, but I'm refering to the discussion of the Space Patrol Academy's curriculum.

If a writer can identify an underlying issue that cannot be fixed even after 60 years, and offer visionary (still) solutions, I have to think he's earned the title "master".

"Space Cadet" offers inspiration and an element of hope while acknowledging that human nature is innately flawed. It speaks to the interrelationship between technology and humans, making it clear that technology should serve people, not people serving technology. It sketches out what looks like a viable organizational structure for an arm of the military that the U.S. will eventually need (and despite their claims to the contrary, the Air Force's belief that their culture can be adapted to extended spaceflight with crews of more than 4-5 people lacks plausibility). The emphasis on the need for cultural studies and language skills in his fiction rings true as the U.S. services realize that these are at least as important as vehicles and weapons.

In all, brilliant. Only four stars because it is not Heinlein's best work (though superior to 95% or more of the fiction in any bookstore today), and it was written for the adolescent market, when these concepts and the story line could have supported twice as much book as we have here.

Still, I'll probably read it again, and I would recommend it to any youngling who was considering the military (along with Starship Troopers).

E.M. Van Court
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lonnie E. Holder HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 31, 2006
Format: Paperback
My title does not have the ring that "Tom Corbett: Space Cadet" had, which was based on this Robert A. Heinlein book, but it is more accurate. Matthew Dodson sounds like a plain, ordinary person, and that was Heinlein's intent. Heinlein's belief always was that the backbone of America was the everyday person doing their job.

Matt Dodson has joined the elite Solar Patrol. Before Matt and his friends can be officers in the Patrol they must endure rigorous, multi-part training. They begin their training on Earth in a process that eliminates many would-be Space Patrol candidates. As their training continues, Matt and his friends become members of a small group of students that have passed one test after another. Finally, the remaining students leave Earth to continue their training on a school ship. The training on the school ship starts with the mundane and ends with the complexities of calculus and nuclear physics. At long last the students move on to an operational ship where their training will help them to overcome the challenges of an actual mission on Venus, where death awaits their first wrong step!

Many people call Heinlein preachy in his books. While there is probably some truth in that comment, if you think Heinlein's viewpoints had merit, you probably like the supposed preachiness. Regardless of which side you fall on, this book has little of Heinlein's explanations of the woes of the world is focuses primarily on the story.

The story in this book is excellent. There is practical science in this book, but Heinlein blended the science into the story so naturally that I hardly noticed it. Those who have been through basic training and technical school in the military will recognize features of both in this book. Robert A. Heinlein was a member of the U.S.
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