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281 of 289 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Where No Manure Has Gone Before
I used to think the funniest unintentionally funny thing I'd ever heard was Lorne Green, Dan Blocker and Michael Landon butchering the theme from "Bonanza." Then I got this album. The tone-deaf stars of "Bonanza" have nothing on "Star Trek's" William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy, whose insatiable TV-star egos pushed them to record music and monologues that transcend mere...
Published on April 25, 2003 by Kevin Cook

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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Squarely in the "so bad it's beautiful" category.
In this world, there are some highly, um, "unique" individuals dedicated to the pursuit of the most godawful, obscure, unintentionally comedic films ever made. These people (the demented folks found at jabootu.com number among them) seek out these paragons of epochal cheesiness and morbid stupidity and turn them into objects of cult worship for their...
Published on February 3, 2004 by Shotgun Method


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281 of 289 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Where No Manure Has Gone Before, April 25, 2003
By 
This review is from: Spaced Out: The Best of Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner (Audio CD)
I used to think the funniest unintentionally funny thing I'd ever heard was Lorne Green, Dan Blocker and Michael Landon butchering the theme from "Bonanza." Then I got this album. The tone-deaf stars of "Bonanza" have nothing on "Star Trek's" William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy, whose insatiable TV-star egos pushed them to record music and monologues that transcend mere mediocrity and ineptitude, constituting an alien art form that defies earthly description. Whatever it is, it's the best of it, or the worst, depending upon your point of view. You'll love it passionately, like I do, or you'll despise it with every fiber of your being, like my wife does. There's no middle ground here.
Shatner's contributions, dramatic monologues set to florid music and rock songs performed with straightjacket intensity, are all taken from his legendary album "The Transformed Man." No one is safe from the shame of Canada: The hallowed words of Shakespeare, Lennon-McCartney and Bob Dylan are trampled and tortured in Shatner's patented overripe acting style, turned up to eleven. Shatner's anguished cry of "Mr. Tambourine Man!!!!" at the end of that song is so unexpected and frightening, it would kill a strolling minstrel dead in his tracks. I must confess, I'm a sucker for Shatner's histrionics, and I admire the chutzpa it took to be a performance artist of such...uniqueness. "It Was a Very Good Year," with Shatner exercising restraint (for him), actually achieves a certain elegance. It's my favorite burst of Shatnerian flatulence.
Nimoy was much more ambitious than Shatner, churning out a mind-boggling five albums of folk, country-western and soft rock covers. Saccharine ballads such as "Sunny" and "Put a Little Love in Your Heart" painfully expose the limitations of Nimoy's earnest baritone as he croons in keys that would make a stuffed dog howl. (Remember how Spock sounded in the throes of a Vulcan mind-meld with the Horta? Put that to music and you get the idea.) To be fair, some of his efforts are admirable. Nimoy's yearning vocal on "Where Is Love" is heart-rending, and he does a pretty fair imitation of Kenny Rogers on "Ruby Don't Take Your Love to Town."
There's also a smattering of screamingly hokey spoken word pieces written by one Charles R. Grean, which Nimoy delivers in character as Spock amid clouds of celestial music reminiscent of the work of "Star Trek" composer Alexander Courage. The best of these is "Spock Thoughts," a litany of hilarious platitudes that includes this priceless advice: "Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant. They, too, have their story to tell!"
The album's Masterpiece is surely "Ballad of Bilbo Baggins," Grean's musicalized Cliff Notes retelling of Tolkien's "The Hobbit." Demented, charming and impossible to dislike, it's a groovy tune straight out of Monty Python, and Nimoy sings it with gusto.
While most of Nimoy's efforts are laugh-fests, it's hard to fault his commitment: He was clearly serious about his music. Luckily for his ardent fans, no one in Nimoy's orbit had the guts to tell Spock he had no clothes.
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79 of 82 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mister tambourine man... MISTER TAMBOURINE MAN!!!, September 23, 2000
By 
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This review is from: Spaced Out: The Best of Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner (Audio CD)
I love so-bad-it's-good music, so obviously I had to have this CD. There's so much superlatively, deliciously, appallingly bad stuff on this CD it's hard to know where to begin. Most of the CD is taken up by Nimoy, but the few Shatner tracks scale heights of awfulness that few other artists have even approached (not even Bobby Goldsboro). "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" and "Mr. Tambourine Man" prove beyond the shadow of a doubt that method acting and popular songs are not a marriage made in heaven. In fact, together they are possibly the worst songs ever recorded by anyone anywhere. I challenge you to listen to these two songs back-to-back and decide which is worse -- perhaps that's something man was never meant to know. The Nimoy tracks are not quite as spectacular, but there are many highlights there too: "Highly Illogical" is delightfully awful, and "The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins" is completely demented (it's a favorite on the Dr. Demento show). The rest of the songs are mostly just evidence of Mr. Nimoy's incredibly mediocre singing voice; some of them, like "Both Sides Now" should be included on a future compilation entitled "Good Songs Sung by Bad Singers". This CD is a treasure that you'll enjoy for years, although not for the reasons the artists intended.
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48 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nearly flawless oddity, March 1, 2004
This review is from: Spaced Out: The Best of Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner (Audio CD)
Has any recorded moment surpassed the intense dementia of Shatner's final scream in "Mr. Tambourine Man"? Do we really want to know?
This absurd CD opens the window to two cult favorites who found second careers as outlandishly kitsch performers. Much has been said of Nimoy's earnest, flat baritone; the reams of Shatner critiques could fill a large, easily combustible windmill -- but that would be too convenient, and a loss to people like me who occasionally need to be reminded why they (and others) actually listen to this stuff -- closely.
These recordings are either dizzying, hardcore, lovable dreck, or, to some, aural manure. History won't decide: you will, if you dare.
I have a complaint about this disk. Yes, just one, about two selections. One of the "Nimoy" tracks doesn't belong here for any reason, as it's nothing more than forgettable lounge muzak with zero artistic input from the Green One. "Music to Watch Space Girls By" sounds like a Herb Alpert outtake where he forgot his trumpet. Also, "Spock Thoughts" is just "Desiderata" recited blandly over third-rate background noise. I can do better, and so can you.
Instead, the compilers should have included "You Are Not Alone," a hideously warbled message of solidarity in this vast, impersonal universe (certainly a theme dear to Spock), and "Alien," a superior spoken dissertation on, well, alienation. They're featured on some other CD that costs nearly $60 used. I'll stick with my cut-out bin cassette for now.
The highlights of "Spaced Out" for me are the most famous offerings: the delirious Shatner takes on Dylan and the Beatles, plus the Nimoy novelty "Bilbo Baggins." The "Golden Throats" CD includes a quizzically-voiced, faded-in lead-in to Shatner's "Lucy in the Sky" edited off for this CD, but it seems we completists will always suffer a little. Also not to be missed are the bathyspherical depths of Nimoy's faulty tone and phrasing found on "Where is Love" and "Sunny"; the pure, howling turgidity of his deconstruction of "Proud Mary"; and a horror actually released as a single (according to the entertaining sleeve notes), and possibly written just for the Vulcan maestro -- "I'd Love Making Love to You," which exudes as much sultry seduction as a frozen duck on an antenna.
I try to imagine how the backing musicians made it through these sessions without screaming themselves, and wetting the floor with laughter.
P.S. I don't know how to create the "voting buttons."
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "You never can find a parking space!" -Leonard Nimoy, September 17, 2004
This review is from: Spaced Out: The Best of Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner (Audio CD)
An unintentional comedy album that surprisingly doesn't grow tiring, Spaced Out is a collection of the "best" (if there is such a thing) of Star Trek's William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy. The album is infinitely quotable, and is an absolute joy to anyone who likes, loves, or hates Star Trek.

Shatner, who until this year only had one album under his belt, makes far less appearances on the album, but he makes up for it with the entertainment value of his songs. "King Henry" is Shatner at his best, emoting every syllable, and would be a great starting point for stand-up comedians who plan to roast his acting. The Sinatra classic "Very Good Year" comes off surprisingly sincere, I have nothing bad to say about it. But Shatner truly shines on "Lucy In The Sky", as he tries to convey the vibe of the Beatles' acid trip lyrics by groaning them like a cartoon ghost. It's as good as it sounds. His highlight is the now-legendary "Mr. Tambourine Man". The usual Shatner pauses are incredibly long, as he stumbles through the Bob Dylan classic. "In the.... JINGLE... jangle... mornin'...", and concludes with an inexplicable anguished cry of the song's title, which is completely jarring and a little scary the first time you hear it. The bizzare nature of it will have your friends talking and laughing about it for months.

Nimoy, however, actually tries to sing. It's not that he's a terrible singer, it's just that everything about Leonard Nimoy is just... strange (which is why he gained a role as a man from another planet in the first place). His attempts at sincere takes on classics like Johnny Cash's "I Walk The Line" and Glen Campbell's "Gentle On My Mind" only evoke the mental image of Spock with a guitar in his lap singing ole' country tunes. On "Highly Illogical", Nimoy sings in character as Spock, describing ironic things about life. The song is hilariously dated when he sings about the perils of "automobiles" and their "push-button windows", when he points out the drawback to our dependancy on cars isn't the depletion of our fossil fules, but that "you never can find a parking space". The best moment on the album, in my opinion, is a mangled song about a mangled soldier; "Ruby, Don't Take Your Love To Town". The song opens with a drum beat intro, the music drops out croaks out the most non-Spock thing you could conceivable imagine him saying (let alone singing): "You painted up your lips and rolled and curled your pretty haiiiiiir!". A friend almost got into a car accident during his first listen to this intro, because he veered off the road in downtown city traffic while laughing. The same subject that Metallica crossed over into the mainstream for dealing with, ends up the death knell for Nimoy's hopes of being a respected singer.

The album's a absolute blast, and the songs are catchy enough to keep them from wearing out their welcome. Oh, and Lord Of The Rings fans? Listen to "Bilbo Baggins". Trust me.
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44 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolute masterpiece of horribleness, June 23, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Spaced Out: The Best of Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner (Audio CD)
This album shows two *actors* - seen from the side that no man has seen before. Which is actually also the same side that no man should EVER have to see.
Before you buy this record, ask yourself this. Would you buy a used car from Mick Jagger? Would you buy a painting by Evel Knievel? Would anyone, in his right mind, buy cookies from the butcher or milk from the mailman?
If your answer to all of the above is 'yes', then go ahead, buy this magnificent CD. This one shows how horribly wrong it all can turn out when people start to venture outside their expertise, when bricklayers become cakebakers so to speak.
William Shatner can't sing! Nor can Leonard Nimoy! But that didn't stop them from going into the studio and recording an album. The outcome is a collection of serious spoofs of the artists themselves. Which is a good thing - it shows a sense of humour.
But who's lauging last? Is it the Star Trek hater, who says: 'Told you them weren't no good anyway nohow'? Is it the conoisseur, who says 'The music may be awful but it's the emotion that counts'? Is it you, having bought this magnificent piece of naÔve art? No. It's them. Nimoy and Shatner. Laughing their butts off, cause they sold another album.
So if you have any sense of humour, listen to this album and have one serious hootnanny of an evening. If you don't have a sense of humour then simply down a fifth of vodka and listen to this album. Same hootnanny.
I'd recommend it to anyone. Especially when you, like myself, suffer from unwanted guests on a regular basis. Want them to leave? Put this record on. Works like a charm.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Should be plastered with warning labels..., November 26, 2005
This review is from: Spaced Out: The Best of Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner (Audio CD)
I just finished listening for the first time and am slackjawed with amazement bordering on stupefication at the indescribability of the experience. It was like seeing a car wreck with severe carnage strewn around the highway and you are compelled to stare at the gore no matter how hard you try to avert your eyes. I kept wanting to turn off the music (?) but couldn't stop listening. I may even need therapy now, I'll know better tomorrow. This kind of media experience should come with warning labels. I think I'll go listen again.
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39 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A treasure, October 29, 2000
By 
Eric Swanson (Calgary, AB Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Spaced Out: The Best of Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner (Audio CD)
Do not misunderstand me here, I am not of the opinion that this album is good in the sense that it's a musical masterpiece or anything. On the contrary, it is quite possibly the worst album ever recorded. The two "artists" knew this of course, they were never under the impression that they were any good at music. When Shatner was asked about this classic piece of dribble on his latest TV biography, he almost burst into tears (or so I've been told) with laughter. And of course he did, him and Nimoy never expected to sell a single copy. Now they're laughing all the way to the bank, because of two kinds of people:
1) The fanatical star trek maniac who absolutely has to have everything related to the classic TV show. He/She is so blinded by their love for the Captain's character that they don't realize that the album is crap, and they actually take it seriously. (I've become aware that some people actually refer to this garbage as a concept album?)
2)Then there's people like me, who buy it for the sole purpous to share the joke with Nimoy and Shatner.
True, you can only listen to this stupid CD once in a while, and then only to cheer yourself up. It is quite possibly stronger than prozak in that sense. Come one people, how can you not burst several internal organs during a raucous fit of laughter when Shatner starts his insane psycho ramblings or when Bilbo's story is rendered beautifully (cough, cough) by Nimoy. I don't think I've laughed so hard in my entire life, so then, why shouldn't I buy it. $18.00 is a small price to pay for infinite laughter. Yes, I get harrassed by friends, and why shouldn't they harrass me? I just "wasted" money on a piece of crap. But I enjoy it, just by imagining what it would have been like to record an album like this. With Nimoy on the verge of cracking up during "the Ballad of Bilbo Baggins" and Shatner flamboyantly overacting each line in his trademark Cpt. Kirk voice. This is the kind of thing that 20 years from now, my kids will find in an old box covered in dust,to be put into the ole' Compact Disc player and enjoyed again. A true relic, and a treasure.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars perhaps the funniest thing imaginable, December 21, 2005
This review is from: Spaced Out: The Best of Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner (Audio CD)
this is actually, for anyone, trekkie or no, one of the most laugh-out-loud hilarious albums ever created. with either--I can't decide--an incredible sense of deadpan humor or tragically overwrought sincerity, the two star trek icons mercilessly butcher a whole album full of otherwise respectable songs (and, in the case of shatner, bizarre composite monologues ripped from Shakespeare).

Shatner manages to 'sing' everything as though it were Star Trek, and Nimoy manages only occasionally to nail a pitch.

Highlights:

Mr. Tambourine Man for its PRIMAL SHRIEK OF DOOM that will really surprise you if you're not ready for it.

Highly Illogical for its bizarre, peppy and inane musings on earth-culture.

The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins for pure absurdism. Google for this and you'll find a video of Nimoy which only makes it better.

Hamlet. I don't think I need to elaborate.

Fans of this FANTASTIC album should really investigate Shatner's newest album, 'has been,' which shines with such gems as "It Hasn't Happened Yet," and a spoken-word cover of the brit-pop "Common People," the latter of which rivals anyting on this album for hilarity.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The apex of musical composition of all time and space!, May 11, 2005
By 
B. Bennett (Hot Springs, AR) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Spaced Out: The Best of Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner (Audio CD)
Prepare your ears for 24 tracks of pure acoustic bliss. Album best if listened too under the influence. Album will provide many hours of joy and laughter. My favorite record of the moment, I encourage anybody with a little extra dough to go ahead and purchase it, it's worth every cent.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ah, Uh, Er - Fascinating..., June 25, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Spaced Out: The Best of Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner (Audio CD)
In the words of Tom Hulce's Mozart in _Amadeus_:
"I never thought music like that was possible!" "One hears such sounds, and what can one say but - ??!!"
I have "Two Sides of Leonard Nimoy" on vinyl - a Christmas present from a sister Trekkie back in 1973 - so some of his tracks were familiar to me - but I had never heard any of Shatner's tracks - I'd heard _of_ them by reputation...
I can truly say that this disc took me where I have never been before. Since I am listening to track 8 ("It was a Very Good Year") as I write this, I am probably still "wherever" I have gone. Will it be possible for me to return from this space/time/musical anomaly? Or will I languish in the outermost reaches of the Shatmoy, unable to find the wormhole that will bring me back? Will my skeletal infrastructure be able to withstand the stress of repeated, escalating bouts of manic laughter? Will I run out of tissues and float from my chair on a sea of hilarious tears?
I really wasn't ready for the opening of Track 1 ("Henry V") - I almost jumped out of my chair. And then, I almost fell on the floor in a body-wrenching spasm of utter and insane hilarity... mmm, if flying scissor kicks could be done vocally...
This CD was the perfect mood-altering substance to pull me up from what was an absolute donkey's-butt nightmare of a day. When I return home, I'll file it in my special CD section, along with Leon Redbone and James Brown and Ween ...
I think it's time to get "Transformed Man" now - I'm ready! Yeah, let's go - make it so!!
LP
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