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Sparrowhawk, Book 2: Hugh Kenrick Hardcover – November 1, 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 424 pages
  • Publisher: MacAdam/Cage; 1st edition (November 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1931561206
  • ISBN-13: 978-1931561204
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,188,697 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The second volume in Cline's series about the foundations of the American Revolution (following Sparrowhawk, Book One: Jack Frake) follows precociously brilliant and rebellious English nobleman Hugh Kenrick. Kenrick demonstrates early on that his life in high society will be a contentious one; as a schoolboy, he defies his pompous uncle, the Earl of Danvers and refuses to bow for the Duke of Cumberland during a politically important visit. Fortunately for Kenrick, his talent is equal to his rebellious streak; he excels in academics, but decides to work for a merchant to learn a trade. His general curiosity leads to an involvement with a group of free thinkers called the Society of the Pippins, a small band that meets every week to discuss social inequities under the monarchy. But disaster strikes when a rival of Kenrick's betrays the group, and the Pippins find themselves sentenced for libel after a brief sham trial. Cline writes eloquently about the particulars of 18th-century English political life, and he proves especially adept at examining Hugh's moral quandary when his friends are arrested. But this volume is significantly less effective than its predecessor, largely because of the gratuitous detail and slow pace. By the time Kenrick's parents send him to Philadelphia to keep him out of further trouble, readers, too, may breathe a sigh of relief.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Edward Cline (1946 -) was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. After graduating from high school (in which he learned nothing of value) and a stint in the Air Force, he pursued his ambition to become a novelist. His first detective novel, First Prize, was published in 1988 by Mysterious Press/Warner Books, and his first suspense novel, Whisper the Guns, was published in 1992 by The Atlantean Press. First Prize was republished in 2009 by Perfect Crime. The Sparrowhawk series of novels set in England and Virginia in the pre-Revolutionary period has garnered some critical acclaim (but not yet from the literary establishment) and universal appreciation from the reading public, including parents, teachers, students, scholars, and adult readers who believe that American history has been abandoned or is misrepresented by a government-dominated educational establishment. He writes regularly for such political and cultural blog sites as Rule of Reason and The Dougout. He is dedicated to Objectivism, or Ayn Rand's philosophy of reason in all matters.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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The heroes in this book gave me the strength to work towards my potential and believe in myself a little more.
Adam Ludvik
I have already read both parts twice and am immensely looking forward to book three (due May 2004) and the rest of the series.
Godfrey Joseph
If one is not familiar with these events, this can be frustrating and make the story move slower than it otherwise would.
Eric Kassan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By William Bucko on November 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"Sparrowhawk - Book 2: Hugh Kenrick" is the story of a young aristocrat, who will not let his soul be stifled by mindless tradition or conformity. As a boy, he is whipped for refusing to bow to the king's worthless son. His free spirit and active mind draw the ire of his conservative uncle, the Earl of Danvers--an ire that will grow into deadly hatred. Like Jake Frake in Book 1 of the saga, Hugh learns how dangerous thinking for yourself can be.
Befriended in London by a free black man, Glorious Swain (a truly memorable character), Hugh is allowed to join the Society of the Pippin, a coffee-house debating society that dares to raise questions the aristocracy will not allow to be discussed. Author Ed Cline gives us another wrenching climax, in which treachery destroys the Pippins and only one is left alive.
"Sparrowhawk" is, as the author says, the story of "what kind of spirit makes possible rebellion against tyranny and corruption."
This time next year, look for "Sparrowhawk - Book 3," in which Jack Frake and Hugh Kenrick meet in Virginia! (Author Ed Cline has kindly let me read it in manuscript.)
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By steve saaf on November 27, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Finally, it seems that Mr. Cline is breaking the mold of the fictional novel that treats the founding of this nation as nothing more than battles and generals. Though they are important, one has to ask oneself "what for?".
With Book 2, the reader see's the English ruling class in action. Where in Book 1 we saw the Judiciary and law in action against a "commoner", here in "Hugh Kenrick" we watch as he is born into this class with the standard "siver spoon", but in good time spits it out and rejects it. The reader watches his motivations, his actions and knows this character through and through. We know why the rejection happens. And we know now about two characters who have established their personal "what for" in the context of their own live's.
Just as importantly, the reader see's the beginnings of what is in store for Her Majesties colonies on the eastern seaboard. After all,if Hugh (and Jack from Book 1)are sent there for being undesirable, from what's left behind we know what type is wanted in the homeland and why.
I was a bit overwhelmed by some of the historical detail, but for the most part I could see that it was necessary background in order to have the protagonist's come to the foreground.
I think now that the maturity of the hero's have been established, what we find in the future books will bring their values "to ground" in the context of them in the colonies facing those men and policies Hugh and Jack left behind.
What role will be played by our protagonist's in the colonies and under what conditions will now be the focus of Mr. Cline's new books. The revolutionary "what for" is in the making!
HURRY UP, MR. CLINE!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Nikola Novak on March 26, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Even though I enjoyed the book, I was somewhat disappointed to see that the plot resembles in many ways that of the first book in the series (especially the climax, even though it has very little to do with the plot of the first book), only this time the protagonist is the son of a Baron and nephew of a Duke (in contrast to the first book). This is the main reason why I deducted a star off my rating.

Readers, however, should be warned that this book is no light reading. It requires constant concentration, and very often, re-reading the passages for full comprehension of what has been said. Long sentences abundant with what is called five dollar words are not rare in this book.

Yet to a zealous reader, this book (and the others in Sparrowhawk series) can offer more than just fun or diversion. They can instill in the reader both historical and moral lessons. The character of Hugh Kenrick is an admirable one, not only for his knowledge, but also his determination to stay true to his principles, even when others are making this choice as hard as it can be.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Godfrey Joseph on April 19, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
...brillantly plotted with heroic characters and beautifully written.
Jack Frake (book one in the series) and Hugh Kenrick (this book)are true heroes comparable to any in the works of Ayn Rand and Victor Hugo. Hollywood should start producing movies of these books now.
All good writing is timeless and one of the many virtues of this book is that it shows there is very little difference between the power-seekers who controlled the UK then and those in power now-the detail may have changed the principles remain the same. Cline has also shown us the British Aristocracy in its essence for the period rather than in what would have been long uninteresting, unnecessary detail-this being a work of fiction and not a historic treatise.
I have already read both parts twice and am immensely looking forward to book three (due May 2004) and the rest of the series.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dale E. Graessle on December 1, 2002
Format: Hardcover
A mind-awakening story of a young man who from birth refuses to allow his soul to be tarnished by conformism, by submission to others, or by the privileges of nobility. One admires his energy and industry, marvels at his precociousness, feels the passion for his betrothed, and cheers for his integrity. Hugo might have written of Hugh Kenrick, "Such men exist!" It is a powerful example of the sort of individual it takes to achieve greatness, independence, and moral certainty by reason. I heartily recommend this book (and the previous volume of the set) to mature young readers currently studying the history of pre-revolutionary America and the heroes who founded a nation.
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