Qty:1
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by MovieMars
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Sealed item. Like NEW. 30 Day Satisfaction Guarantee.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $2.10
Learn More
Trade in now
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$15.59
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Mr Moovie
Add to Cart
$18.09
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Anchor*Media
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Spellbound [Blu-ray]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Spellbound [Blu-ray]


List Price: $24.99
Price: $13.39 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $11.60 (46%)
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
20 new from $9.97 10 used from $8.46
Amazon Price New from Used from
Blu-ray
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$13.39
$9.97 $8.46

Frequently Bought Together

Spellbound [Blu-ray] + Notorious [Blu-ray] + Rebecca [Blu-ray]
Price for all three: $37.37

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Actors: Gregory Peck, Ingrid Bergman, Leo G. Carroll
  • Directors: Alfred Hitchcock
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Black & White
  • Language: English (Mono)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: MGM
  • DVD Release Date: January 24, 2012
  • Run Time: 118 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (163 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0065N6KNW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #49,132 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

Commentary with Author and Film Professor Thomas Schatz & Film Professor Charles Ramirez Berg
Dreaming with Scissors: Hitchcock, Surrealism and Salvador Dalí
Guilt by Association: Psychoanalyzing Spellbound
A Cinderella Story: Rhonda Fleming
1948 Radio Play
Hitchcock Audio Interview
Original Theatrical Trailer

Editorial Reviews

"The secret recesses of the mind are explored with brilliant and terrifying effect" (New York Herald Tribune) in this fascinating psychological thriller from Alfred Hitchcock. Featuring powerful performances from Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck, this masterpiece of mystery, romance and suspense boasts an OSCAR®-Winning score by Miklos Rozsa and a haunting dream sequence by Salvador Dalí.

Dr. Constance Peterson (Bergman) is a dedicated psychiatrist who puts all her passion into her work — until she falls in love with Dr. Edwardes (Peck). Unfortunately, it soon becomes clear that Edwardes is an impostor — an amnesiac — who may or may not be a cold-blooded murderer. Pursued by the police, Constance must decide whether to turn in her mysterious lover...or risk her life by trying to unlock the dark secrets in his mind.

Customer Reviews

Great acting and this movies is super.
Cecilia M. Isaacs
Sounds complicated, I know, and perhaps uninteresting because too much, but this movie really works.
Zendicant Pangolin
Spellbound is an excellent film directed by Alfred Hitchcock.
Matthew G. Sherwin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray
Spoilers:

Combining Hitch's fascination with Freudian symbolism, desire to work with Salvador Dali and writer Ben Hecht, "Spellbound" manages to be very entertaining even if it is a flawed Hitchcock classic. Compromise started with casting with Hitch forced to take Gregory Peck for the lead opposite his choice Ingrid Bergman. Peck does a nice job even if he is a bit stiff in the role of Dr. Edwardes--only he isn't Edwardes at all. It turns out that "John" suffers from amnesia and must rely on Dr. Constance Peterson (Berman) to discover who he is and what happened to the real Dr. Edwardes.

End of Spoilers

Blu-Ray Transfer: "Spellbound" will leave fans of the film, well, spellbound. The film receives a handsome transfer. How does this compare to the Criterion? "Spellbound" looks sleeker in a good way with nice, consistent grain (for the most part) with the only major flaw I could detect some over use of edge enhancement (resulting in some intrusive haloing). Could this look better? Probably--the use of edge enhancement was unnecessarily heavy handed but, on the whole, it bests just about every DVD presentation I've seen of the movie.

Bear in my that the bigger your screen, the higher resolution your monitor and the more noticeable the improved resolution/depth will be. It isn't a huge difference but it IS there (depth though is noticeable different on both small and large screens).

"Spellbound" had a very troubled production from conflicts between Hitchcock and Selznick's consultant on the film, to butting heads over the dream sequence (which uses a lot of Dali's concepts but was actually redesigned by William Cameron Menzies at Selznick's request)which was heavily edited for the film.
Read more ›
15 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
55 of 60 people found the following review helpful By keviny01 on October 12, 2002
Format: DVD
The video quality of Criterion's DVD version of SPELLBOUND discs look a bit sharper, more detailed, but grainier than Anchor Bay's re-pressed version from 2000 (in which the flash-of-red color shot was restored). The audio quality of Criterion's 1.0 mono soundtrack is also a little more detailed and more distinct than Anchor Bay's 2.0 mono track. The Anchor Bay disc also sounds much louder, but there are audio distortions in a few places. The soundtrack of the Criterion disc (and many DVDs) was recorded at a much lower volume level, which is usually an effort to retain as much as possible the dynamic range of the source material. The Criterion DVD booklet says the film's original overture and exit music has been included on the disc for the first time. This is simply not true, for the re-pressed Anchor Bay disc also has the overture and exit music. The initial pressing of the Anchor Bay disc, in which the red-color shot is erroneously shown in B&W, does not have the overture and exit music, however.
Although SPELLBOUND helped solidify Hitchcock's position in Hollywood, it isn't one of his best films. But Marian Keane's remarkable analytical audio commentary on the Criterion disc should heighten your appreciation of the film. Keane juxtaposes the themes in the film against the manner in which Hitchcock made his films and the manner in which we, the viewers, watch them, and suggests that they are somehow interrated. She points out that many Hitchcock films (including SPELLBOUND) are about people who take pleasure in watching and analyzing other people, which is also the very thing that we, the viewers, do when we watch such films.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
40 of 45 people found the following review helpful By gobirds2 TOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 17, 2003
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
SPELLBOUND was directed by Alfred Hitchcock and produced by David O. Selznick in 1945. As the story unravels it is essentially a murder plot interwoven around psychiatrists and psychoanalysis. It is actually Alfred Hitchcock's approach to the story and his collaborations with composer Miklos Rozsa and surrealist artist Salvador Dali that highlights this film. Gregory Peck plays John "J.B." Ballantine who poses as a psychiatrist while in a state of amnesia. Uncovered by Dr. Constance Peterson played by Ingrid Bergman, Ballantine must find out if he is responsible for the death of the missing psychiatrist that he posed as and simultaneously discover his own identity. Miklos Rozsa's score is both romantic yet eerie as Ballantine tries to remember what happened through analysis of his dreams. Alfred Hitchcock hired Salvador Dali to design illustrations and paintings in order to construct a crisp and vivid rendering of these dreams. Hitchcock did not want to use conventional techniques such as blurred camera shots to recreate the dreams. He wanted them to be as clear and even sharper than the rest of the film. He wanted Dali's style of using shadows, lines of convergence and the idea of infinite distance incorporated into the dream sequences. In the dream sequence we see a black stage highlighted with people at gambling tables with huge mysterious looking eyes peering over them. A man cuts away at the fabric of one eye with a giant scissors revealing another eye. In another part of the dream we see a man standing on a roof behind a chimney that has sprouted roots. The hooded man holds what looks like a deformed or eccentric wagon wheel in his hand. In the distance there is a formation of rocks and boulders, which look like they are sprouting into the shape of a man's head.Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

Have something you'd like to share about this product?
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions