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Spherical Trigonometry Paperback – March 15, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1406771107 ISBN-10: 1406771104

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 92 pages
  • Publisher: Church Press (March 15, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1406771104
  • ISBN-13: 978-1406771107
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,100,013 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By calvinnme HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
There are books on spherical astronomy that talk about this subject, but this is the best book dedicated to the subject in the general sense. Say you have two points on the surface of a sphere defined by angles theta and rho, how do you determine the distance you'd have to travel on the surface of the sphere to get from one point to the other? The answer is in this book, without throwing in the confusion factor of latitudes and longitudes if astronomy is not your field of endeavor. The book is practical, discusses the equations in detail, and has many examples and exercises with answers available in the back of the book. The only real weaknesses in the publication are that it could have had more illustrations and some of the examples stop short of giving a complete answer.

This book is not about translating from one coordinate system to another, it is about those of us dealing with spheres and their measurements that need to stay within that framework.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By R. Stewart on February 12, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I took geometry and trigonometry in high school over 50 years ago, and I was delighted to find this book available on the Kindle. My curiosity about spherical trigonometry dates back to my experiences as a junior officer in the Coast Guard in the late 60's, when sextants and chronometers were our backup to the Loran system. When time (e.g., high noon) and conditions (horizon and sun both visible) were right, we'd take measurements of angles at known times, use a Nautical Almanac to figure out where the heavenly body was over the earth at the moment we took the angular reading off the sextant, and then work them up into our position using Bowditch and tables of logarithms. The process was a bit like baking a cake, perhaps a bit longer start to finish, but it worked! But as useful as these procedures were, all these complicated formulae were something of mystery to me. And when I'd sit down with a pencil and a blank piece of paper, I was never clever enough to derive them.

This book will give the interested reader a road map to these derivations. The key is something called a sterographic projection, and this is beautifully explained in a minimum of words. But since the presentation is terse, you've got to pay attention to everything Donnay says. A great example is at location 193 (the Kindle is alas pageless) where Figure 2 is explained and some interesting properties of oblique cones are demonstrated. The whole thing takes two paragraphs, less than 300 words, and a simple figure. If you remember your geometry you will be able to derive everything in those two paragraphs with a little work and patience. It is a remarkable contrast to modern text books that layer pictures and verbage over top of some fairly simple ideas.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jason Dowd on May 7, 2011
Format: Paperback
Spherical Trigonometry is one of those niche subjects that no one ever teaches you, but that at some point you are simply expected to know. The good news is that with the right source of information, the elements of this subject can be mastered within a week.

The better news is that this book, in spite of being over 60 years old, is that right source of information.

One of the main differences between planar and spherical trigonometry is that in spherical trig, the angles and the sides of spherical triangles are both measured as angles. The analog of the Pythagorean Theorem for a right spherical triangle with hypotenuse c is cos c = cos a * cos b, and this result reduces to the planar version for infinitesimal side lengths as it should.

All of this and more will be revealed to you in this work, and by the time you are done, you will never be mystified by a spherical trig formula again.

The only weakness is the highly dated chapter 6 on calculations. Unless you still make regular use of a slide rule, you won't be getting too much out of this one.
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By moses_b on September 2, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Haven't and probably never will read it from cover to cover, but I use portions as reference.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John Beyerlein on November 24, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the good book on this subject. If you wish to learn spherical trig and are willing to do some work, this book will teach you.
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