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Spirit World
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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on May 15, 2012
I have waited nearly forty years to finally see this strange bit of Kirby make it's collected appearance. And the wait was worth it. For those of you out there who have been collecting all the DC Kirby omnibuses, this new addition to the line will be a welcome one, especially due to it's extreme scarcity. This new DC Kirby entry runs at about roughly 110 pages, black and white, and is deluxe sized. The stories in this book are inspired by true supernatural experiences and Kirby's art style here is very reminiscent of his 1950s horror comics work. Mark Evanier serves up a fine introduction detailing the secret origins of what is perhaps Kirby's strangest project. For Jack Kirby fans everywhere, this book is a must have for your Kirby library. Enjoy.
P.S. This volume also includes the aborted second issue of Spirit World,of which these stories were to appear at a later date scattered among various 1970s era DC horror comics of the time. Also the paper quality in this volume is of a stronger and sturdier sort than found in the regular Kirby omnibuses. Again, enjoy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 13, 2014
Spirit World: written by Jack Kirby, Mark Evanier, and Steve Sherman; illustrated by Jack Kirby, Mike Royer, and Neal Adams (1970-71; collected 2012): An oddity caused in part by DC's inability to commit to new projects in the 1970's, Spirit World was supposed to be part of DC's foray into the world of black-and-white comics magazines. And it sort of was.

But DC hedged its bets by creating a whole other shell company to have its name on the covers, constantly downgraded what the book would contain, and ultimately dumped it on the market in such a way that the first issue may have never reached most newsstands.

Jack Kirby and friends put together this magazine, along with In the Days of the Mob, which had a similarly truncated existence. Kirby's Boswell, Mark Evanier, lays out the odd circumstances surrounding the creation of Spirit World. DC comes across as even more bumbling than usual for the time period.

The stories here are a lot of fun, both from the first issue and the never-published second issue. Along with a fumetti and a prose piece, we get some horror pieces that lean on parapsychology rather than the overt supernatural. One of the ghosts is a cousin to the composite ghost-monster of Robert Bloch's classic story "The Hungry House," and Kirby's visualization of such a thing is one of the kicks of the volume.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on July 8, 2013
The reproduction is terrific and the additional material is welcome, including Mark Evanier's comments. BUT, this book is way overpriced for what you end up with. I think you can probably find the original magazine for less than this cost.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Jack "King" Kirby tried to present something different for DC Comics to produce during his time there in the 1970s beside the superhero stuff that would predominate the publishing industry down the road. It was in a magazine format, but the newsstands and distributors didn't know where to place it, and DC Comics (under Carmine Infantino) seemed to not care about it anyway, so it died. Its a shame that Kirby's attempts to produce other material failed at DC (was it due to Carmine, non promotion, etc.?) Too many ideas are not properly supported and then do not succeed. I think it would have worked right next to the Star and National Enquirer magazines, if Carmine and DC treated it seriously.
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on December 28, 2012
A bit of the obscure Kirby stuff that is rarely seen or collected for reprint. The art is vintage Kirby and is a very quick and enjoyable read.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on August 31, 2012
I well remember having a copy of the original mag.It didn't impress me much.As well, having at least one of the color efforts ment for the second issue. IF you can get the originals dirt cheap, great, if not, If you just want to see what this effort looked like, this is the way to go.The weird photo paste ups that kirby would do, never much grabbed me.IF these efforts would have seen print,as two or three 15 cent color comics, the title might have had a chance for a longer run.I wish that dc had used color at least for the second set of stories, since they first seen print in color.IF any one but Kirby, marvels number one artist, had tried to do a book like this, even one issue would not have seen print.This book, is pretty much for only the most hard core of the kings fans.Even inside these pages, It is admited, that Kirby knew that not a penny would be made off this effort for at least a year of steady publishing.DC wisely cut their losses, cancilling after just one issue.IF you want vintage kirby scary stuff, go for his black magic stuff from the early 1950s.Far superior.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 20, 2013
Every the innovator, Jack "King" Kirby continually tried to move beyond the standard comic format. With Spirit World he did so, but DC Comics never gave him the support it deserved. The materially holds up reasonably well but the over reliance on photo collages drags it down. And I am one of the few who prefer Vince Colletta inking this material. The Mike Royer inked stories seem too much like standard superhero fare, rather than the macabre stories Kirby wanted.
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