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Split Ticket: Independent Faith in a Time of Partisan Politics (WTF Where's The Faith?) Paperback – July 30, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: WTF Where's The Faith? (Book 2)
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Chalice Press (July 30, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0827234740
  • ISBN-13: 978-0827234741
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,230,171 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"At a time when partisan politics involves backbiting and cynicism, here is a collection of essays about politics aimed at unity and hope. In the spirit of a friendly roundtable, the essay writers, mostly 20- and 30-something pastors, each discuss the importance of Christians' involvement in political activism. The writers represent areas from Los Angeles to Bosnia and take up a variety of causes both systemic and personal, including genocide and affordable housing. Their diversity proves that Christians "are not a monolith" and must wade through what are characterized as competing truths in discerning whether to advocate. Some urge Christians to fight the power of empire, citing the way Jesus challenged the status quo to effect change. Others retreat from activism, citing Jesus's pacifism. Yet the authors all agree that Christians should work against injustice in some way and should employ peaceful debate to work toward unity. Using their own tales of injustice in a post-9/11 world, they force Christians to wake up and take a stand--even if they themselves cannot agree on exactly what that should be." ---- Publishers Weekly, July 2010

"Both conservatives and liberals have taught us that you can have a compelling argument and lots of good ideas, and still be mean. It is time for us to learn that just as important as being right is being nice. Split Ticket is one more sign of a new conversation in post-religious-right-America...moving beyond the old camps, stale debates, and empty rhetoric. It is time for a new political imagination enough donkeys and elephants long live the Lamb." ----Shane Claiborne, author of Jesus for President

"In the midst of a bitterly divided political landscape, these thoughtful, beautifully written essays serve as a breath of fresh air to everyone longing for political perspectives that don t divide and conquer, but rather heal and mend. This volume will help individuals and communities of faith engage the political process in authentic ways that get past superficial rhetoric and lead to transformative change. " --Phil Snider, coauthor of Toward a Hopeful Future

Both conservatives and liberals have taught us that you can have a compelling argument and lots of good ideas, and still be mean. It is time for us to learn that just as important as being right is being nice. Split Ticket is one more sign of a new conversation in post-religious-right-America...moving beyond the old camps, stale debates, and empty rhetoric. It is time for a new political imagination enough donkeys and elephants long live the Lamb. --Shane Claiborne, author of Jesus for President

In the midst of a bitterly divided political landscape, these thoughtful, beautifully written essays serve as a breath of fresh air to everyone longing for political perspectives that don t divide and conquer, but rather heal and mend. This volume will help individuals and communities of faith engage the political process in authentic ways that get past superficial rhetoric and lead to transformative change. --Phil Snider, coauthor of Toward a Hopeful Future

About the Author

The Rev. Amy Gopp responds to her calling to the work of Christ by serving as a global activist and peacemaker-one who through dynamic preaching and creative teaching urges God's people to engage in compassionate service that imbues hope and empowerment for all. An ordained minister of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Amy currently serves as the Executive Director for Week of Compassion, the relief, refugee, and development ministry fund of the Disciples church.

Brandon Gilvin currently serves as the associate director for Week of Compassion, the relief, refugee, and development ministry fund of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). He is the author of Solving the DaVinci Code Mystery and co-wrote Wisdom from the Five People You Meet in Heaven with Rev. Heather Godsey. He has worked in congregational ministry and with ecumenical organizations based in Nairobi, Kenya and Toronto, Canada.

Christian Piatt is a managing editor for PULP, an independent alt-monthly publication for southern Colorado; a musician, spoken word artist, and cofounder of Milagro Christian Church in Pueblo, Colorado; cocreator and coeditor of the WTF? (Where's the Faith?) book series; contributor to theooze.com and Red Letter Christians blog.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A. R. Worley on September 11, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My name is Amy and I hate Sunday school books. There I said it. I generally avoid Sunday School at my Mainline Presbyterian church altogether because I hate Sunday School books. I hate how pleasant and temperate and benign they are. Designed to offend no one, countless Mainline Christian texts aim the theology right down the middle, where only the most easily offended of the chronically grumpy could possibly have a problem.

Many of the Sunday School texts I've, well, endured, addressed topics ever-relevant to my thirty-something-married-two-kids-working-mom-life such as, Baptism: Sprinkle or Dunk? Grace: Earned or Bestowed? The Trinity: How is One God Three? And while the arm-chair theologian in me finds these topics academically interesting to a degree, they don't have diddley squat to do with my day to day life as a practicing Christian in contemporary America.

I have to say I was skeptical of the aim of Split Ticket: Independent Faith in a Time of Partisan Politics. In my experience as a born again Christian Evangelical, turned Buddhist, turned reformed Presbyterian, texts promising `independent' faith discussions have come up as short as the of that stick we all talk about. Two essays into Split Ticket, I was thrilled to realize my skepticism was misplaced.

Bluntly, this book is theologically and politically left of center. It is not and should not be sold as a survey of Christian politics across the board. There are no Christian Right apologists in Split Ticket. However, the essayists themselves are from diverse traditions within the Christian faith--from Evangelical to Mainline, African-American to Lily White--and the progressive political views they hold are interesting, dynamic, and, for the most part, theologically supportable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Zachary Bailes on May 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
It is no secret that politics within American society has become increasingly partisan. Politicians and pundits from the left and right attack each other with vehement passion and fiery intensity. Yet lost in the midst of left and right are people of faith who have come to think that theological identity equates political identity. For those that write in Split Ticket, young adults in their 20s and 30s, there is an understanding that no position is apolitical, and that "all human beings have guiding principles in their lives" (viii). The challenge in the heart of Split Ticket stands as the challenge, and opportunity, to find unity in our diversity.

As I read this collection I heard my own thoughts reflected, and many challenged. Faith and politics have a lengthy and messy history within America. As part of Chalice Press "WTF: Where's the Faith?" series, assembles young voices to ask that pointed question, "WTF?" At the core of this series and this book is the belief, and faith, that God can be present in our daily lives, and daily decisions.

Engaging issues from activism to voting, Split Ticket challenges the imagination to breathe deeply and engage the substantive issues of the day. Posed for the reader is an opportunity to meet their faith in the public arena. While faith has been seemingly relegated to the private realm, Split Ticket does not shy away from beckoning faith out into the open. As Amy Gopp says, "But if we take seriously the text from John 14:6, "I am the way, the truth, and the life," then we understand that to live the truth is to choose the way of the cross, the way of Christ, which is the way of love" (29). Faith possesses relevance, and it is found at the cross.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Readsa Lot on February 6, 2011
Format: Paperback
When I requested this book (disclaimer: book was received through the Early Reviewer program at Library Thing) I was intrigued by the idea of how those who considered themselves as having an independent faith responded to partisan political situations. I was hoping to read of persons who straddle the line between the extremes of faith in very partisan political situations. This series of essays was not that, but it did give a perspective different from the very conservative faith which is what I usually hear expressed.

The essays are written by those who would be considered progressive or liberal, which is more my own bent. They are presented in a group study-friendly format and are targeted to an age group younger than my own. Yet, I did find the personal expressions of faith and the actions taken in response to their faith interesting and would encourage those who are tired of hearing the same old conservative talking points and arguments to consider reading it.
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