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Spotlight 2015 R CC

This critically acclaimed film chronicles the true story of how the Boston Globe uncovered a decades-long cover-up of child abuse within the local Catholic Archdiocese.

Starring:
Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton
Runtime:
2 hours, 9 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller, Mystery
Director Tom McCarthy
Starring Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton
Supporting actors Rachel McAdams, Liev Schreiber, John Slattery, Stanley Tucci
Studio Open Road Films
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By M. Oleson TOP 500 REVIEWER on December 27, 2015
Format: DVD
Back at the dawn of the millennium, The Boston Globe uncovered a scandal that reached beyond the city and up to the highest levels of the Catholic Church. With some hesitation, a small group of investigative reporters looked into reports of priests molesting children. Their column called “Spotlight” often featured scandals and corruption but this investigation was met with stonewalling at every turn. The Catholic Church and the Boston diocese under Cardinal Law was powerful in the local community.

The reporters included Mike Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams), Matt Carroll (Brian d’Arcy James) who reported to Walter ‘Robby’ Robinson (Michael Keaton) and him to editor, Ben Bradlee, Jr. (John Slattery). A new Jewish editor-in-chief arrives from Miami. Marty Baron (Liev Schrieiber) wants to instill new life into the paper and sees “Spotlight” as key. What makes the film special and interesting is that director Tom McCarthy (“The Visitor”) keeps thing moving quickly and shows some of the grungy details that reporters go through to get a story right. Constant rejection, door-to-door inquiries and sifting through an unending supply of books, news clippings and other documents provide a real sense of the grunt work involved.

While the acting is superb at every level, I will take note in particular of Ruffalo and McAdams. Aside from their commitment to the story, they have different ways of getting their information. Mike is relentless in his pursuit and shows his passion outwardly. Sacha is quieter, more sensitive to her sources and methodical. Both characters and actors are brilliant. Robby is also the antithesis of Marty. He’s aggressive, persistent, willing to get his hands dirty and supportive of his reporters.
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Format: Amazon Video
Nine Things About "Spotlight"

1. This movie is an account of the true story of how The Boston Globe investigated allegations of children being raped by priests in Boston in 2001, and uncovered a world-wide system of child sex abuse that the Catholic Church had been allowing for 30 years.

Like most people, I know about the scandal. But I never really knew about how it was first discovered, or how much the Church actually, officially knew. This movie taught me a lot about both of those points, in a way that was both nimble and hard-hitting. It's one of the best movies about investigative reporting I've ever seen. This is All the President's Men of the 21st century.

2. About halfway through this movie, I wondered why nobody had been assassinated during the investigation or production of the film. It not only makes the Catholic Church look like a bunch of criminals, but the city of Boston, too. As one character said, "If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one."

3. The movie makes the point several times that priest abuse isn't about being gay. It's not that the priests preferred boys, they just preferred children being available and vulnerable, and usually from hard lives. Boys were easier to keep quiet than girls, because of the extra heaping of guilt and shame that boys would feel. The movie does show girl victims, as well, though.

4. The victims depicted in the movie make it clear that they weren't just raped physically, they were raped spiritually. Boston is a hard-core Catholic town, and several victims said they saw priests as being close to God. The trauma ripped apart their very soul.

5.
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Format: DVD
"Spotlight" (2015 release; 128 min.) brings the true story of how the Boston Globe eventually broke the story of the widespread abuse of young children by Boston priests while the Catholic Church stood by and covered it up. As the movie opens, we are in "Boston, MA - 1976", where we see a priest being accused of abuse. "Wait until the arraignment, the press will be all over it", comments one cop. "What arraignment?", replies the other cop. We then fast-forward to "July, 2001", and we get to know the 4 member Spotlight, an investigative reporting team at the Boston Globe. The Globe also has just gotten a new editor, Marty Baron, "an unmarried Jewish guy who doesn't like baseball" (the implication being he's no fit for Boston). But it's not long before Baron picks up on a recent column about abuse by Boston priests, and he orders Spotlight to look into it. At this point we're not even 15 minutes into the movie, but to tell you more would spoil your viewing experience, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.

Couple of comments: this is the latest movie from writer and sometimes director Tom McCarthy (he won an Oscar for writing "UP"), and I have to say, "Spotlight" is the giant leap forward as a director, and he has now placed himself in the upper ranks of today's directors. The trick with these movies is: how can the director brings a movie, whose outcome we already know going in, and still capture our attention? It was the same question faced by the makers of "All The President's Men", of course, and in fact "Spotlight" very much reminds me of "All The President's Men": top-notch all the way, and it feels like a thriller as you're watching it.
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