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Sprawl: A Compact History Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-0226076911 ISBN-10: 0226076911

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 306 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press (November 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226076911
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226076911
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #774,144 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

After 70 years of suffering the slings and arrows of academic criticism, suburban life finally finds a compelling defender in Bruegmann. A professor of art history and urban planning at the University of Illinois–Chicago, Bruegmann demonstrates that urban sprawl is a natural process as old as the world's oldest cities, wherein large metropolises reach a point of maturity and those with financial means escape the congestion and high prices of city life. What has changed over the past century, the author says, is that an increasing number of citizens have achieved the financial means to participate in what was once an exclusive luxury of the wealthy. Bruegmann acknowledges that the effects on cities are not always positive, but he also demonstrates that many of the criticisms of suburban sprawl—e.g., that it is culturally deficient and environmentally noxious—are greatly exaggerated and ignore the very real benefits sprawl offers in terms of privacy, mobility and choice. With his disdain for doomsday predictions and his disregard for the academic consensus, Bruegmann's thorough analysis is sure to be controversial, but a shot of controversy ought to do the field, and public dialogue about it, some good. 25 b&w illus., 5 maps.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"After 70 years of suffering the slings and arrows of academic criticism, suburban life finally finds a compelling defender in Bruegmann. A professor of art history and urban planning at the University of Illinois-Chicago, Bruegmann demonstrates that urban sprawl is a natural process as old as the world's oldest cities, wherein large metropolises reach a point of maturity and those with financial means escape the congestion and high prices of city life. What has changed over the past century, the author says, is that an increasing number of citizens have achieved the financial means to participate in what was once an exclusive luxury of the wealthy. Bruegmann acknowledges that the effects on cities are not always positive, but he also demonstrates that many of the criticisms of suburban sprawl-e.g., that it is culturally deficient and environmentally noxious-are greatly exaggerated and ignore the very real benefits sprawl offers in terms of privacy, mobility and choice. With his disdain for doomsday predictions and his disregard for the academic consensus, Bruegmann's thorough analysis is sure to be controversial, but a shot of controversy ought to do the field, and public dialogue about it, some good."--Publishers Weekly

More About the Author

Robert Bruegmann is an historian of architecture, landscape and the built environment. He received his BA from Principia College in 1970 and his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in 1976. In 1977 he joined the faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago where he is currently University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Art History, Architecture and Urban Planning. He has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia College of the Arts, MIT and Columbia University.

Customer Reviews

Bruegmann claims that European cities sprawl just as much as those in the US.
pigletpuu
As it is, it seems to me that this book will do little to change anyone's view of the 21st century city.
Zechariah D. Lockrem
Books like Bruegmann try to make that label stick, but they don't quite succeed in doing so.
Lee Scott

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 50 people found the following review helpful By A. Pagano on March 1, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I suppose I am one of those "elites" that Robert Bruegmann writes about in "Sprawl: A Compact History." I was born and raised in New York City. I grew up riding public transit and shopping at local mom n' pop stores. I watched many of my relatives leave the big city for greener pastures, and I noticed what a pain it was to go visit them on holidays because of the traffic. My parents refused to buy into the suburban lifestyle and stayed in the city. Even though my life and career path took me away from my beloved city, I have always tried to reside in the more urban parts of whatever area I happened to live. The suburbs never appealed to me, so naturally I was drawn to all of the anti-sprawl rhetoric and it all seemed perfectly reasonable to me. Bruegmann's book has changed that.

"Sprawl: A Compact History" might appear to be "pro-sprawl," but to dismiss the book out of hand because of this is to miss much of the point. Bruegmann does a great job explaining some things that probably should be obvious: sprawl is not new, there are lots of appealing aspects of sprawl (even for city dwellers) and it's not going away. He discusses the history of what most people would consider sprawl in places as far flung as Chicago, Paris and Tokyo and demonstrates that it was going on for a long time before anybody called it "sprawl" and decided it was bad. He notes that the existence of sprawl does not necessarily mean the death of great cities. He tackles many of the prevailing anti-sprawl arguments including the idea that sprawl causes congestion and ruins the environment.
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82 of 112 people found the following review helpful By Michael Lewyn VINE VOICE on June 12, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The most seemingly innovative part of Bruegmann's book is his attempt to create a history of sprawl. His basic argument runs as follows: something vaguely resembling sprawl happened in ancient Rome and 18th-century Europe, therefore sprawl will forever be with us, therefore sprawl is unstoppable.

Bruegmann's argument fails because is that it totally ignores differences of degree. There is an enormous difference between

(1) a region where sprawl is just one lifestyle option among many and you can live an auto-free life in a city or a streetcar suburb (e.g. most of the United States in the 1920s, the NYC region today, and much of the rest of the world today)

and

(2) a place where buses stop running at rush hour and you need a car to be a functional member of society (e.g. some Sun Belt cities and most small towns).

It seems to me that situation (1) is indeed normal in an affluent society; situation (2) requires decades of bad public policies.

Moreover, Bruegmann makes concessions that eviscerate his argument. On the one hand, he implies that sprawl is inevitable in an affluent society. On the other, he admits that many metro areas have grown more compact in recent decades, and that cities are beginning to gentrify. (I suspect that he was not quite sure whether he wanted to be balanced or to write a pro-sprawl polemic; sometimes he leans in one direction, other times not).

His attempt to deny government's involvement in sprawl is sometimes a bit silly.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Katroshka on November 30, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I was initially interested in the very different take on sprawl presented in this book. I don't like sprawl, but I am often turned off by the passionately subjective arguments typically utilized by anti-sprawl activists, so a more dispassionate look at it was welcome, and certainly the book offers a new perspective that at times seems more realistic than those he criticizes. As I continued to read the book I began to see that Bruegmann offered no thoughts of his own on sprawl- merely criticisms of anti-sprawl arguments (often belittling those with what most people would call legitimate concerns about sprawl). The only positive thing he could say about sprawl was that it offers a way out of the Dickensian urban environments of the past, completely ignoring the fact that urban environments could and did change in the last 100 years, and could and do offer nice places to live. He also ignores the fact that suburbs could and are be planned in different ways than sprawling, endless seas of cookie-cutter houses (and the fact that lots of people, not just "elites" don't like their house to look like thousands of others in a subdivision). Of course, this makes sense as he apparently despises planners. How many people would seriously argue that the mass building that occurred over the last 100 years should have been done without government planning? Bruegmann does.

Ultimately the book was depressing to me, as it was basically a litany with the point that we should simply be resigned to sprawl, in any form, as it is merely natural human behavior and nothing can or should be done about it. Luckily for my sanity, the signs of a shift towards more thoughtful living arrangements are to be seen all around us, and I simply don't believe Bruegmann, for all his dry and dispassionate counterpoints.
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