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And Then It's Spring (Booklist Editor's Choice. Books for Youth (Awards)) Hardcover – February 14, 2012


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 2
  • Lexile Measure: 600L (What's this?)
  • Series: Booklist Editor's Choice. Books for Youth (Awards)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Roaring Brook Press; 1st edition (February 14, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596436247
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596436244
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 8.8 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #221,189 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Amazon Best Books of the Month for Kids, February 2012: and then it’s spring pays homage to the hopefulness and anticipation that accompanies planting the first seeds of spring in the dark soil of winter--waiting, checking, waiting, wondering if the first green shoots will ever come and imagining all the things that could have gone wrong for those little seeds. Then one day spring is suddenly, gloriously, here--replacing the brown with shades of green happiness. Illustrations by 2011 Caldecott Medalist Erin Stead (A Sick Day for Amos McGee) match the graceful simplicity of the text, capturing the emotion of the characters and expanding the story with whimsical details. --Seira Wilson

From Booklist

*Starred Review* A first-time author and the Caldecott Award–winning illustrator of A Sick Day for Amos McGee (2011) team up in this beautiful ode to a patient gardener. After the winter, “you have brown, all around you have brown,” but small hints of spring, like red robins and rain, hold promise. A young boy, joined by his dog companion, plants seeds, each labeled with a picture of carrots or sunflowers or peas. But as much as they wait, hope, and examine the dirt with a magnifying glass, there’s no green to be found. Fogliano’s simple, tender text has a solemn tone, which perfectly reflects the anticipatory state of the boy and his animal friends. The woodblock and pencil illustrations give life to animals so expressive and endearing it hurts, and the layout—a mixture of full-bleed spreads and white-bordered vignettes—paces the story well. A two-spread fantasy in the middle of the story—in which the boy imagines birds pecking at the seeds or bears stomping on them—is smile-inducing, particularly a scene of a befuddled bear with a planter on his head. But what’s most fun to notice throughout are the small, subtle details on each page. It’s not easy to wait . . . and wait . . . but children, like the boy, may realize that patience often yields big rewards. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Fans of A Sick Day for Amos McGee—and award-watchers, in general—will be eagerly anticipating this, Stead’s first children’s book since winning the 2011 Caldecott Medal. Preschool-Grade 2. --Ann Kelley

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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4 star
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See all 34 customer reviews
In the dead of winter we are all longing for spring!
Melissa Sack
I will use this in my classroom (if I teach K or 1) with extended reading activities.
E. LeVan
This book has simple words and beautiful illustrations.
Valerie A. Baute

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Martha Frankel on February 15, 2012
Format: Hardcover
in a world where even toddlers grab their iPads for instant gratification, what a treat to read a book where patience is the abiding theme. Julie Fogliano's writing hits us in the gut because it is so simple, yet so stirring. and Erin Stead's drawings give off a whiff of hope. An instant classic
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By nosmatnot on February 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover
The language is playful and childlike ("please don't step here. there are seeds and they are trying"), in the way that good poetic language often is. The title even reminds me of that ee cummings poem [in Just--] ("...when the world is mud-/ luscious...). The writing in and then it's spring is kind of a hybrid of that and my favorite Karla Kuskin-y, Ruth Krauss-ish goodness. Stead's artwork is warm and charming and the brown is indeed hopeful--full of impending life and a reticulum of animal tunnels with critters just itching to kick themselves free. I'm hoping that this will make all the February brown around me a little more hopeful, too. But, if not, it was at least fun to read.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By E. LeVan on February 18, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
She is a great illustrator, wonderful really. This book has 1 sentence on each page with the exception of one page that has a short paragraph. The reading is meant more for an adult to do, as there were a few unusual words that I recall. Really great "asides" in the illustrations. If you like Sick Day for Amos McGee, which is by this same illustrator and her husband as the writer, then you will like this.

Simple. Mostly about the illustrations, to me.

I will use this in my classroom (if I teach K or 1) with extended reading activities.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on February 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Patience is a virtue. Riiiiiight. Actually it is, but tell that to anyone under the age of fifteen (to pick an arbitrary age). Though it varies from child to child, immediate satisfaction is something our day and age strives to give us in everything from grocery shopping to movie selection. When kids can just hop on the internet and within less than a minute be connected to the sites they want and need then the idea of something taking not just days but weeks is capable of blowing their furry little minds. I know that in the past teachers have done assignments that involve raising seeds with the idea of teaching children about how plants grow, but it seems to me that there's just as much to be said for teaching kids that under normal circumstances all good things come to those that wait. And Then It's Spring does a rather good job at drilling this idea home. An understated little beauty with enough tiny details to ensnare squirmy children worldwide, author Fogliano and illustrator Stead have pooled their considerable talents to bring us a great example of what happens when you stop to grow the flowers.

A boy, his dog, his turtle, a rabbit, and various assorted birds go out on a day that wavers between blue and gray skies. Says the book, "First you have brown, all around you have brown." Armed with a wagon of seeds the boy sets about planting each one systematically, burying them under little mounds of dirt. The sun and the rain come but there is no green to be seen. A week passes and the boy worries about the seeds and whether or not they've been eaten by birds or crushed by bears. Another week passes and another until one day the brown is all gone, "and now you have green, all around you have green." And there, pushing through the earth, the seedlings make their debut.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Valerie A. Baute on February 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Spring is coming. When will the green appear? Plant some seeds. Check daily, weekly, and eventually, after the rain and finally sun, there it is!

This book has simple words and beautiful illustrations. It is great for a read aloud in March in parts of the country that are patiently awaiting spring. The illustrations are cute. The boy is adorable with his glasses and his magnifying glass. There is a sweet dog, tortoise, and rabbit on every page. My favorite is when the tortoise sits on its tail. There is one page where it says "And the brown, still brown, has a greenish hum that you can only hear if you put your ear to the ground an close you eyes." On that page, you can see into the ground. You can see worms and ants making paths, mice sleeping or popping up to see what's going on. Above ground, the boy and the rabbit are listening to the ground. You can also see the roots growing deeper and deeper. While reading this to children, it is great to slow down and look at the pictures.

Just like in real life, the last page is an instant green. I always marvel in the fact that it seems to turn green overnight. This wonderful picture book portrays that perfectly. Overall a perfectly sweet, simple book showing spring appearing at just the right time!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ellie Ann on March 18, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is an amazing and hopeful book. During the dark days of winter, you forget green and all you see is brown. I love the hope this book brings. That even though you can't see things growing and trying, they are. And then one day, if you are patient...SPRING!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By N. Frost on February 24, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is a very sweet and poetic book on waiting for spring that I can't wait to share with my preschool storytime group. Too often, books that are beautiful or clever miss the mark elsewhere in terms of child-appeal. This book melds all, perfectly. I want more, Ms. Fogliano---how about the other seasons?
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