Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Squash: A History of the ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: 100% guaranteed delivery with Fulfillment By Amazon. This hardback book shows normal shelf wear associated with limited use. The spine of this book shows some wear. This cover or dust jacket has light scratches and/or indentations on its surface. Dust jacket has small repaired tears, light scratches, or jacket is not included Pages of this book are crisp and clean. Outside page edges show slight discoloration.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Squash: A History of the Game Hardcover – September 23, 2003

3.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$58.00
$24.26 $0.42

Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more
$58.00 FREE Shipping. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Squash: A History of the Game
  • +
  • Squash Racquets: The Khan Game
Total price: $79.95
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this detailed account of a sport few Americans know much about, Zug, a former Dartmouth squash player and freelance writer, intersperses throughout his narrative elements of surprise with analogies and references to draw readers into this unfamiliar terrain. For instance, he begins by explaining that squash, known primarily as an elitist endeavor reserved for prep schoolers and yuppies, developed in London's Fleet Prison in the early 1800s. But Zug makes squash relevant by capturing an interesting parallel between the game and American social movements as he details squash's evolution from the pastime of America's most exclusive universities and clubs to the emergence of women on the American squash scene in the 1920s and America's fitness obsession in the late 1970s and '80s, which made the game accessible to the middle class and brought squash courts to every neighborhood YMCA from coast to coast. Furthermore, realizing that a sport is only as compelling as its champions, Zug presents colorful bios of the game's best and most eccentric players, including college dropout and Deadhead Mark Talbot, John McEnroe-like Victor Niedhoffer (who retired in his prime to protest the sport's anti-Semitic stance in the 1960s) and Roshan Khan (from a famous squash family, his "lusty" lifestyle led Ted Kennedy to say he came from the "Irish part of Pakistan"). While only squash fanatics will find this detailed work a must read, Zug's passion for and knowledge of the game make this a unique addition to the library of sports histories.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Who would have thought squash, the game in which a little ball is smashed into a wall with racquets, could be so endlessly fascinating, so steeped in culture and history? Zug, a longtime squash player, begins in the 1500s, when tennis was all the rage. But by the early 1700s, there were variations of the game, including one called racquets, created by inmates in the Fleet, a British debtors' prison. From there we move smoothly on to the 1800s, when students at elite Harrow School, just outside London, transmuted racquets into the game we now call squash. The author charts the modern history of squash--from the 1860s to the present day--with gusto, introducing us to dozens of the game's best and most flamboyant players (best and flamboyant seem to go hand-in-hand in squash circles), explaining why this seemingly simple game is among the most subtle and hard-to-learn sports. It's one of those books about a very specialized topic that somehow turns out to be surprisingly readable even for those unfamiliar with the subject. David Pitt
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner (September 23, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743229908
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743229906
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #196,773 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
...if you've never played golf, it's darn near unwatchable. If you've never played squash, I'm not sure this book is all that readable, save in small chunks. However, for a player such as me it's a great book. Most interesting are Zug's efforts at unravelling the origins of the game from the morass of legends, myths and speculations surrounding that whole English prison/public school debate; and his thoughts on the fairly recent conversion of the North American countries to the international softball game. He mourns, as I do somewhat, the loss of the quirky games and personalities that the American hardball game produced.
If I had one quibble it would be the author's dwelling on the stories and athletes with ties to the Ivy League's perennial squash powers. I could have used a little less history of Harvard's stars of the 1920's and a little more on some less well-known squash luminaries. For example, Heather McKay, the Australian, won the British Open 16 consecutive years, didn't lose a single game in a tournament for nine straight years, etc., etc., but merits two paragraphs?
Overall an impressive accomplishment for Mr. Zug. Well written, thoroughly researched, and heartfelt. Thanks!
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Take your pick: Whether you're a sports nuts or a fan of history, you'll love this book. Zug catches you right away and pulls you into this fun, quirky, elite, competitve world. Even if you've never seen a squash game, this is a great read. You'll be delighted by the memorable characters and refreshing writing. A GREAT read!!
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
"Squash: A History of the Game" was a very interesting read, and I especially recommend it for all players of Squash. Although dense at points, this book really gives a great history of how squash came to be. James Zug takes us through the transformation from a game named fives, first played against a kitchen chimeny wall, to raquets made from bamboo sticks, to the regulation size courts and oversized hyper titanium raquets we know today. It even explained why "Squash" is called squash, the mysterious question that nobody on my team seems to know the answer to. Im not going to tell you however, you'll have to read it on your own. Like I said before, I belive this book is more enjoyable for squash players. This is just my opinion however, so if you don't play squash I still suggest you try reading this book.

Well anyway thats my 2 cents. Altogether I think this book is definitly a great read, and definitly very useful as a reference if you are writing an essay on the history of squash. Four star material.

-Jalper
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book, as the forward by the late George Plimpton indicates, is the first comprehensive history of American squash, and it is a hard act to follow. As such it is pretty much assured "instant classic" status.
Problems with the book: 1) The title does not indicate that it is a history of squash in America. Except for the very early history of squash in England, do not expect to find much outside the U.S. and Canada. 2) It is written for the squash player, and will be difficult to read for outsiders--except perhaps as a reference.
Good things about the book: Everything else.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you love the game, like to read, this book on squash tells the most complete history of the game...
Laced with humor, insight, history...this is as much a social history as the main players are revealed as the characters outside the game that are the Who's Who in rarified circles....this is the book for anyone wanting to know the people, the places, the courts, the equipment that were the game to the current state of the sport.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book completely underplays the dominance of Khans for 20 years, Jahangir Khan who also eclipsed the career of Mark Talbot. Janhangir won 6 Open Titles, 10 consecutive British Titles, 12 US Hardball Titles, Jahangir won 12 of 13 US Open Hard Ball titles he competed. Eclipsed the reputation of Mark Talbot of US whom he beat 10 times in 11 encounters. For 5 years : 555 consecutive matches won. The most deceptive, cunning, agressive player.

Jahangir Khan was replaced by Jansher Khan, the impeccable retriever of impossible balls who was unsquashable for next 10 years. The lanky, lean, mean. Between them, they played 37 times, score 18:19, there is no reference to such fierce and balanced rivalry.

Geoff Hunt was known to have most excruciating training regime, that included 40 sprints of 100 meters a day. 1981 World Open, against Geoff Hunt, Jahangir Khan lost the first game 7-9 to win the next three at 9-1, 9-2, 9-2. Geoff Hunt quipped," today I came to know what I have been doing to others."

Such Titanic moments are blacked out in this book. It speaks of Harvard, its players, their greatness.

The book neither looks across The Pond, nor at the Asians.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Squash: A History of the Game
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: Squash: A History of the Game

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: harry's razor