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Stand Up and Cheer!


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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

With America's economy at a standstill, the President creates the cabinet post of Secretary of Amusement and charges his new appointee with entertaining the country so everyone will forget their troubles. After all, as the President says, "any people blessed with a sense of humor can achieve success and victory". But certain businessmen who are getting rich off the misery of others try to sabotage this effort by launching a smear campaign to discredit the entire idea. Shirley does her part as little Shirley Dugan, Who has a song and dance act with her father (James Dunn).

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It can't really be called a "Shirley Temple movie," because the original Little Miss Sunshine appears in it for just 10 minutes or so. But you can easily see how Stand Up and Cheer! gave birth to the most dominant star of the mid-1930s: Shirley Temple brings down the house. With just a bit of dialogue and one musical number, "Baby Take a Bow," Ms. Temple sets the cuteness meter to 11 and packs considerable hilarity into her already-definable personality. (Old pro James Dunn, who co-starred with Temple in a few subsequent features, plays her father/dance partner here.) The movie itself is something else again, in every sense. Purportedly based on an idea by Will Rogers, it imagines a new cabinet position--Secretary of Amusement--established by the President himself. Said official (Warner Baxter, fresh off a similar role in 42nd Street) must drum up lotsa socko entertainment to pull America out of its Depression doldrums. The near-surreal results include the acrobatic vaudeville team Mitchell & Durant as loopy senators and a sequence involving Stepin Fechit and a talking penguin dressed up as Jimmy Durante. Yes, you read that right. Meanwhile, corporate fatcats conspire to ruin the plan; they want America to remain scared and passive. But you know they don't stand a chance against Shirley Temple--whose 1930s career fulfilled the movie's idea of cheering up a population staggered by hard times. --Robert Horton

Special Features

  • "Shirley Temple Theater: The Little Princess" featurette

Product Details

  • Actors: Warner Baxter, Madge Evans, James Dunn, Sylvia Froos, John Boles
  • Directors: Hamilton MacFadden
  • Writers: Hamilton MacFadden, Edward T. Lowe Jr., Lew Brown, Malcolm Stuart Boylan, Philip Klein
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, Closed-captioned, NTSC, Dolby, Full Screen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo), Spanish (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: G (General Audience)
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox
  • DVD Release Date: March 27, 2007
  • Run Time: 68 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000LC4ZEY
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #102,699 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Stand Up and Cheer!" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

This is the worst Shirley Temple movie I have ever seen.
triple l
I even understand that this movie was an attempt by Hollywood to try and get people to think more positively about the country.
Lonnie E. Holder
I loved the dance routine, but besides those few scenes the movie was not very enjoyable.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By S. Moskey on January 5, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
This movie was never intended to feature Shirley Temple as a star. At the time this movie was made, she was a minor child actor who had never been on film before, and had she not subsequently been made famous by other movies, her role in this film would have been either forgotten, or relegated to an obscure footnote in the history of American movies. It is totally dishonest of the current distributors of "Stand Up and Cheer" to give Miss Temple top billing and a photograph on the cover of the VHS. She was not the star of this movie at all! She has a 2-bit part in a movie that starred bigger names in Hollywood. But if you are Shirley Temple die hard who must have everything she ever did, buy this film (caveat emptor). If you are a student of the American cinema, and want to see how good (or bad) an early talkie was, then you should certainly buy this movie, if nothing else for its historical significance. If you want to see rare film footage of "The Princess of American Song" Sylvia Froos (one of the great voices of the 1930s), BUY THIS VIDEO. But don't buy this if you are expecting a sweet, polished performance from Miss Temple a la "Heidi".
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 23, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
I bought this movie mainly because Shirley Temple was going to be in it. From reading some of the reviews, I knew it would not be one of her best. After watching the movie, I realized it was not her acting that was lacking, but the plot of the movie itself. Some aspects of the movie were detestable, such as the scenes with the black man playing an idiot and kissing up the white people in the movie (I, as an African American was disgusted); however, it must be realized that such things reflected the times in which the movie was made. Also, the movie's plot didn't really move along and many times was confusing or boring, although it did do an good job at showing what that time period was like in America. As for Shirley, her scenes, though few, were the best in the film. I loved the dance routine, but besides those few scenes the movie was not very enjoyable. If you want some of Shirley's better works, I suggest you buy Bright Eyes (my personal favorite), Poor Little Rich Girl, or Wee Willie Winkie.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "sopera" on February 19, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
The film that began Shirley Temple's career at Fox, "Stand Up and Cheer," really isn't much to cheer about.
The premise is actually rather fun: In the dark days of the Depression, the US Government decides to form a Department of Amusement to restore joy to the American people through song and dance. Many of the principals, including Madge Evans and Jimmy Durante, are excellent. However, the film is quite dated and several scenes, such as one in which a man is coaxed into a fish tank, are rather offensive.
There are only two things that save this film from being a total disaster: the final celebration sequence and the three short scenes with James Dunn and Shirley Temple. Dunn and Temple are both extremely talented and work very well together (they went on to appear together in seveal more films). Their musical number, "Baby Take a Bow," is the film's high point. Dunn, as the quintessential 'tall, dark and handsome' song and dance man, is definitely a charmer, and Temple, at only five years old, handles the choreography with enthusiasm and poise.
This is not the best film to buy...try to catch it on TV or watch for the dance routine on a Temple documentary instead.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "xemoforpunkx" on December 10, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Shirley Temple was great in all 4 scenes of this movie. If you're a Shirley Fan, get "Baby Take A Bow" to see a better plot. I think many get mixed up in thinking that this was a Shirely Temple movie becuase she was on the cover. But the main plot isn't even about her. "Stand Up and Cheer" is not one to see if you want Shirely Temple movie. There are other Shirley movies much better than this one out there.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This 1934 movie was Shirley Temple's first full-length feature film for Fox Film Corporation, which would later merge with 20th Century Pictures to form 20th Century-Fox. Unfortunately, it's not one of her better efforts. The "Baby, Take A Bow" production number, where Shirley expertly sings and dances alongside James Dunn, who plays her father, is the highlight of the film, but we don't get much Shirley, except for a few earlier scenes, and a brief appearance in the parade scene at the end. Fox later recycled the song "Baby, Take A Bow" for a later Shirley Temple movie of the same name. The plot revolves around FDR appointing a Secretary of Amusement (Warner Baxter, of 42nd Street fame) to lift the country out of the Great Depression. In the film, the strategy worked, as the Depression was over by the film's end, but in real life, the Depression lingered for another seven years, until the U.S. entered World War II, following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Yes, there are stereotypes galore in the film, not only racial (e.g., comedian Stepin Fetchit - real name Lincoln Theodore Monroe Andrew Perry - playing dimwitted butler George Bernard Shaw; actress Tess Gardella, playing "Aunt Jemima" in blackface - Gardella was Italian-American), but also regional (rural whites depicted as hillbillies), and the inevitable Hollywood stereotype of greedy businessmen profiteering from other people's misery - is there any other kind portrayed in the movies?

For home video release, the film was cut from 80 to 69 minutes (even parts of the end credits are cut off).
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