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Stanley Hayami: Nisei Son Paperback – February 25, 2009


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Paperback, February 25, 2009
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Brick Tower Books (February 25, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1883283663
  • ISBN-13: 978-1883283667
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Stanley Hayami, Nisei Son is marketed as a biography for Â"all ages,Â" but this slender book, deftly annotated by Joanne Oppenheim with a stirring Foreword by Senator Daniel Inouye, is also Â"one for the ages.Â" Without question, this compilation featuring a young Japanese AmericanÂ's World War II concentration camp diary and letters Â"homeÂ" to his family from the European battlefields will quickly become a minor classic. In the process of imparting an invaluable history lesson about a defining chapter of American life and death, this volume puts a noble human face on the NikkeiÂ's tragic wartime experience and bequeaths to posterity a befitting hero to embody the vexing promise of our democratic, multicultural nation. --Arthur A. Hansen, Professor Emeritus, History & Asian American Studies, California State University, Fullerton

Review

Rare indeed are glimpses into the mind and heart of a boy as he becomes a man, but even more intriguing about Stanley HayamiÂ's story is that it is told in his own voice, penned as his sixteen-year-old life of innocence and idealism unfolded in an American concentration camp and ended, still in his teens as a new recruit, trying to help a buddy in one of the fiercest and last battles in Europe in World War II. We have Joanne Oppenheim to thank for masterfully bringing together his diary, letters, and family accounts in the turbulent context of the forced banishment from the West Coast, incarceration in desolate camps without charges nor trial, and iconic service in the U. S. military of Japanese Americans during the war.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Betty on April 5, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book provides an excellent first person view into the way that one teenage internee is able to continue to pursue his passions for his family, friends, school, current events, drawing, and reading despite the prejudice and the inhumanity of the internment camp system. While the diary ends with Stanley joining the army, the author has located wonderful letters from Stanley to his family that continue to capture this optimist's zest for life. The author does an exceptional job providing both background info for Stanley's dairy entries and drawings as well as more critical views of the internment camp system from his brother Frank. I used a part of this book with my 8th grade US history students and they clamored for more. As I read I thought about what a wonderful parallel this book would offer with Anne Frank, Zlata's Diary, Farewell to Manzanar, Baseball Saved Us and other books. It once again makes one ponder why do the good seem to die so young?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Leland1234 on January 18, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've just turned the last page of this book, and I am in awe. First, of the sbuject matter. How lucky are we that Mr. Hayami kept a diary and wrote letters, and how lucky that so much of his writing survived. Second, of the graceful and complete annotation by Ms. Oppenheim; so well done. Your research and your words flowed beautifully in the tale of such a sad time.

I purchased the book as part of my research for a historical novel set in one of the internment camps. This book has inspired me, has provided valuable reference material, and has made me weep. Thank you so much for putting this story out there for all of us to learn from.

Leland Dirks
http://www.amazon.com/Leland-Dirks/e/B004L0XJSK
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By Amazon Customer on June 27, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not only is it a heart warming diary but a slice of history that is not to be forgotten. Such a tragedy that affected so many Japanese people's lives and their ability to survive and overcome the injustice that was inflicted upon them without bitterness. Amazing!
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Format: Paperback
An excellent, inspiring account of a teenager during World War II who left his family in an American concentration camp to fight for freedom in the U.S. Army, only to be killed in action 2 weeks prior to the war's end in Europe.
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