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Star Strike: Book One of the Inheritance Trilogy Kindle Edition

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Length: 399 pages
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ian Douglas is one of the pseudonyms for William H. Keith, New York Times bestselling author of the popular military science fiction series The Heritage Trilogy, The Legacy Trilogy, The Inheritance Trilogy, Star Corpsman, and Star Carrier. A former naval corpsman, he lives in Pennsylvania.


Product Details

  • File Size: 641 KB
  • Print Length: 399 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins e-books (October 13, 2009)
  • Publication Date: October 13, 2009
  • Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0010SEORG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #175,683 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Ian Douglas, one of the many pseudonyms for writer William H. Keith, is the New York Times bestselling author of the popular military SF series The Heritage Trilogy, The Legacy Trilogy, The Inheritance Trilogy, and the ongoing Star Carrier and Star Corpsman series. A former naval corpsman, he lives in Pennsylvania.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By John L. Mahan on February 24, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read the previous two triologies, Heritage and Legacy. This is a great start to the new series. Mr. Douglas/Kieth has done it again.

Being a former Marine, I feel he captures the feel and attitude of the Marines he is writing about. He brings in the stress of combat and the aftermath into the forefront and does not make the characters supermen and women. He brings out the depth and emotion of what it feels like to be close to a small group of people. He also, for me at least, captures the antipathy and bigotry that Marines run into. He shows that the Marines are not killing machines but real people.

The universe he has created over the last six books is a very deep and rich one. It is not a perfect universe where everyone gets along and all push together. He brings out the competion that humans have and the conflicts that arise.

If you have not read the previous books, go back and read them. You will not be sorry. But you can pick this book up and will not be disappointed.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Marcus Daniel on February 11, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There is a lot of plot refreshing and background explaining in the first third part of this book, all things that are known to those who read the first 6 books. But it playing hundreds of years after book 6 justifies some explaining and also opens up for a new readership of course. It essentially gets started with this new trilogy on how (hopefully) humanity destroys the Xul. I must say they are off to a good start with the help of a new alien race ally. The end of this book leaves taste for more and I can not wait for book 2 of this trilogy where things should get really interesting. Overall I love it and would recommend a new reader to get started with the very first book though: Semper Mars.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By NYC Reader on February 7, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The seventh Star Marine book by Ian Douglas benefits from many of the same strengths as the earlier books: well though-out future history; nice technological extrapolation; good action sequences. The plot seems a bit derivative of earlier books and the book could have used a good editor - there are continuity errors and it can be repetitive. That said, I really enjoyed it and will buy the rest of the trilogy. Douglas (William Keith) gets the military, writes in a gritty way and isn't afraid to tangle with one of the tougher issues of military sf: how advanced technology will effect the troops on the ground or how war is fought. The opening scene is a great riff on the first chapter of Heinlein's Starship Troopers, only grittier and brought up to date. Buy this, but read the ealier books in the series first.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By David Andrews on February 24, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Great continuation of the saga. But there were many repetitive paragraphs and the wrong name for a character was used a number of times at the end... You'll see what I mean when you read it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By DSNG Artist on July 18, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
I've been a fan of Ian Douglas for quite a while. Found his work at a local Borders and I bought his entire Legacy Trilogy. I loved it. Found it every intriguing, as a fan of sci fi that enjoys works that are more hardcore than StarWars.
I think it was the shock factor of actually "devastating" earth [go read it for the true details] that magnetized me to his previous work, and I was also drawn to the futuristic theme interwoven into the combat suits, small cylindrical Marine drop-pods, battle spacecrafts and the setup of modern grounded structures. Obviously a lot of thought went into that series by the author, and I give him his due credit.

But in this new series, perhaps the third Trilogy set written by the author, I was disappointed. Why? Because the work became very predictable, adamantly redundant and slightly stale, in my opinion. The main villains to humanity in the previous series, keep rising as a deadly ancient menace that is focused on eradicating all other sentient life in the galaxy. And the resilient humans keep rising over the years, becoming smarter over the centuries as they assimilate the eldritch technology stolen from the Xul [and given from other friendlier old aquatic races from foreign a distant world]. Trans-c technologies that help to provide super acceleration have been extensively studied and innovatively applied to earthly Marine cruisers/warships. There are several rings around the earth, which serve as communal housing depots and office establishments. The dispersal of Nano-D clouds is introduced, helping the Marines to devour their foes on harsh battlefields. But they good guys are still no match for the Hunters of the Dawn [the Xul villains], technology wise.

In this brand new series... the grand plot is Exactly the same.
Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Stanley A. Russell on March 21, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Ian Douglas's "Star Strike" is a great addition to his past trilogies. All the action of the Marines in space. I consider him a top writer of the SF/Military genere and this book lives up to his talents. The Marines meet their biggest challenge against a foe that is far ahead of the human race in technology and intelligence. One of best things about Douglas' books is the way he weaves life as a Marine with the very plausible science of artificial intelligence and faster-than-light travel and communications.
I highly recommend this book and can't wait for the next installment.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By D. G. Hulan on June 13, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the first volume in the "Inheritance Trilogy," his third trilogy in his future history of the Marines. It's about 500 years after the events of the "Legacy Trilogy," and humankind has spread over a considerable number of stars, as the Xul seem to have lost the location and even knowledge of the existence of Earth after the Marine raid destroying one of their bases at the end of the previous trilogy. But then a final message squirted from the AI running a ship bound for the Andromeda galaxy, carrying a lot of Important People (in cold sleep) who'd decided not to risk being around when the Xul attacked Earth, reveals that the Xul had found that ship and downloaded all the information from the AI's data banks before destroying it. So someone of the Xul knows of Earth again, and the question isn't if but when they'll strike again (and then search out other human-inhabited planets and annihilate them). So the Marines to the rescue again, with an expedition to take the war to the Xul. And they're also looking for help, and think they may have found it in the region of the Orion Nebula... This series isn't a patch on several others of similar nature that I've read, like Weber's Mutineers' Moon/Armageddon Inheritance/Heirs of Empire trilogy, or the first few of Ringo's Posleen War books (though that one has gotten tedious as Ringo has let his far-right politics dominate the stories, so I haven't read the last few), but it's readable enough and has fast action, so I keep buying and reading it even though the characters are generally pretty cardboard and it's not terribly imaginative.
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Did the auther got the marine ranks wrong?
TO: W. Sip

RE: "At the end of the book, Warhurst was *promoted* from Gunnery Sergeant to Staff sergeant, which is a lower rank."

Yeah, I noticed that too. True, Douglas was a sailor and not a marine, but he was a corpsman and probably had been assigned to one or more marine units. ... Read More
Jun 19, 2012 by Walter R. Johnson |  See all 2 posts
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