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Star Trek Enterprise - The Complete Fourth Season

866 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Includes 22 episodes on 7 DVDs.

Despite the near-certainty of cancellation, ratings in the cellar and nothing left to lose, the fourth and final season of Star Trek: Enterprise was unanimously hailed as the best. After ending season 3 with a mind-boggling cliffhanger, series creators Rick Berman and Brannon Braga handed show-runner duties to executive producer Manny Coto, who rejuvenated the flagging franchise by bridging the gap between Enterprise and the future developments of Star Trek: The Original Series. By recruiting lifelong Trek experts Mike Sussman and the husband-and-wife team of Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens to his writing staff, Coto ensured that political events in the Enterprise timeline would lead to a "coalition of planets," thus forming the Federation cornerstone of Star Trek's future. But first, Coto had to find a way to extract Capt. Archer (Scott Bakula) and his battle-worn crew from an alternate timeline--the result of the continuing Temporal Cold War--in which the Nazis have invaded U.S. soil in 1944. In the normal Enterprise timeline, political upheavals have left relations between Vulcans, Andorians, Tellarites, and Humans in a state of near-disastrous chaos.

Into this blazing cauldron of action-adventure, Coto and staff introduced story arcs that connected to Star Trek's future, including a three-episode arc ("Borderland," "Cold Station 12," and "The Augments") in which Dr. Arik Soong (played by Next Generation alumnus Brent Spiner) and his superhuman "Augments" chart a tragic course that would lead, in future generations, to the creation of Spiner's cybernetic NextGen character, Data. "The Forge," "Awakening," and "Kir'Shara" returned T'Pol (Jolene Blalock) to her native Vulcan, where encounters with the legendary philosopher Surak, and zealous sect called the Syrannites, lead to pivotal history with the Vulcan High Command. In subsequent episodes, Phlox (John Billingsley) would discover the reason why some Klingons lack "cranial ridges" (thus solving a vexing Star Trek mystery), and "In a Mirror, Darkly" marked and eventful return to the "Mirror Universe" from the original series episode "Mirror, Mirror," for what Coto aptly describes (in the bonus featurette) as a two-part "romp," complete with a "Mirror Universe" title sequence, the reappearance of the U.S.S. Defiant from the original series episode "The Tholian Web," and a glorious recreation of a "Constitution Class" starship bridge that gave long-time Trekkies a breathtaking rush of nostalgia.

In the closing episodes, the formation of the Federation is threatened by a radical xenophobe (Peter Weller) whose isolationist tactics lead Trip (Connor Trinneer) and T'Pol to a future of interspecies parenthood, and while the series-ending "These Are The Voyages..." is considered a disappointment by some, it provided a suitable Next Generation tribute to Star Trek's past, present, and future. Considering the daunting challenge of tying up loose ends while looking forward in a way that demanding fans could appreciate, it's fair to say that Enterprise reached a satisfying conclusion that its cast and crew can be proud of.

DVD features
It's only fitting that Season 4's bonus features have a bittersweet quality, celebrating the Star Trek franchise while acknowledging its uncertain future. For the first time on any Star Trek series, closure was imposed prematurely, and "That's a Wrap" (a video from the Enterprise wrap party at the Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood) has the privileged feel of an emotional family reunion. (Unfortunately, Jolene Blalock and Connor Trinneer were unable to attend.) "Inside the 'Mirror' Episodes" offers a closer look at those enjoyably nostalgic episodes ("we put the 'Ho' back in Hoshi" jokes Mike Sussman about Linda Park's "empress" persona), and in "Links to the Legacy," Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens explain how they brought Enterprise closer to its original Star Trek heritage. "Visual Effects Magic" charts the astonishing advancements in digital effects since the comparatively crude effects of Next Generation, and "Enterprise Secrets" reveals an affectionate assembly of behind-the-scenes personnel on the final day of shooting. There's one final Easter egg (NX-01 File #10) about the ultimately futile "Save Enterprise" fan protest against series cancellation (with appreciative comments by Scott Bakula and Connor Trinneer), and as always, the informative audio and text commentaries are fan-essential features loaded with detailed trivia and anecdotal history. --Jeff Shannon

Special Features

  • 22 episodes on six discs
  • Over 3 hours of special features:
  • Enterprise moments, Season 4
  • Inside the "Mirror" episodes
  • Enterprise secrets
  • Visual effects magic
  • That's a wrap
  • Links to the legacy
  • Deleted scenes and outtakes
  • Photo gallery

Product Details

  • Actors: Scott Bakula, John Billingsley, Jolene Blalock, Dominic Keating, Anthony Montgomery
  • Directors: Allan Kroeker, David Barrett, David Livingston, David Straiton, James L. Conway
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Box set, Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround), English (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 6
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Paramount
  • DVD Release Date: November 1, 2005
  • Run Time: 939 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (866 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #25,928 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Star Trek Enterprise - The Complete Fourth Season" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

151 of 163 people found the following review helpful By DEAN M. Dent on August 13, 2005
Format: DVD
The fourth season of Star Trek Enterprise was the season that most Trekkers have been waiting for, with homages to the original series(Mirror Universe,The Eugenics Wars,Orion slave women,T'Pau), as well as rectifying continuety errors(The Vulcans,The Klingon "forehead" issue).Unfortunately,the show was cancelled prematurely as the show was becoming what Trekkers been waiting for since "Broken Bow".

One of the biggest contributing factors for the success of the fourth season was supervising producer Manny Coto,an original series fanatic who brought Enterprise back on the right tracks as far back as season three.Sensing that the show wasn't going to see a fifth season,Executive producer Rick Berman handed the reins to Coto, who set about in correcting the many elements in Trek history that have been disregarded,which drove away even the most dedicated fan.

The season's format was tweaked to make room for multi episode arcs which dealt separately with The Eugenics Wars(The Augment trilogy featuring Brent Spiner as Arik Soong),A Vulcan Civil War(featuring Surak, and T'Pau),A Klingon Virus (resulting in the humanoid Klingon foreheads from the original series), and the mirror universe featuring the USS Defiant from The Tholian Web.

One of the biggest disappointments of the season itself was the final episode "..These Are The Voyages" which takes place on the Enterprise-D, featuring Riker and Troi.Instead of giving the NX-01 crew a dignified send off,they were used supporting characters in a glorified "Next Generation" episode.

The finale (written by Rick Berman and Brannon Braga) was called a "Valentine to the fans".But the real valentine was the entire fourth season which finally gave the fans what they wanted,and the most problematic Star Trek series a dignified ending, dispite it's weak finale.
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46 of 51 people found the following review helpful By M. Hart on August 24, 2005
Format: DVD
Following the success of four live-action TV series and ten feature-length films, producers Rick Berman and Brannon Braga attempted to create a fifth live-action "Star Trek" series that would be set approximately 100 years prior to the time of Captain Kirk (during the original "Star Trek" series of 1966-1969), 200 years before the time of Captain Picard (during the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" of 1987-1994) and 100 years after the fictional character Dr. Zefram Cochrane flew the first warp-capable spaceship, as depicted in the 1996 film "Star Trek: First Contact".

The new series, entitled "Enterprise", debuted in the fall of 2001, months after the previous "Star Trek" series, "Voyager", concluded its seven-year run. As the show's title implied, the ship used in the show was named "Enterprise" and had serial number NX-01 with a maximum speed of warp 5. It's crew was comprised of Captain Jonathan Archer (Scott Bakula, formerly the lead actor of the sci-fi TV show "Quantum Leap" of 1989-1993), Vulcan science officer T'Pol (Jolene Blalok), pilot Ensign Travis Mayweather (Anthony Montgomery), ship's communications officer Ensign Hoshi Sato (Linda Park), the Denobulan Dr. Phlox (John Billingsley), weapon's officer Lieutenant Malcolm Reed (Dominic Keating) and ship's engineer Commander Charles 'Trip' Tucker III (Connor Trinneer).

Over 12,000,000 viewers watched the first season's premiere episode, but subsequent shows had ever-shrinking audiences. The average number of viewers per first-season episode was about 6.7 million; for the second season, this number dropped to 4.4 million and for the third season, the number dropped further to 3.8 million.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Geek Chic on September 17, 2006
Format: DVD
This season was the absolute best that Enterprise had to offer! Enterprise finally saw its potential realized under the masterful direction of Manny Coto. The best characteristic of season 4 was that fans finally saw references to the Original Series that we had hoped to see much earlier on in the show. Intriguing stories, action, creativity, and developing the relationships among the crew in a more meaningful way were the traits that made it such a disappointment to have it cancelled after such an amazing season. Under the vehicle of Season 4, one gets to travel to the Mirror Universe with the Enterprise crew, see a Gorn, and see the bridge of the USS Defiant (old school style).

The only drawback to this season is that it contains the final episode by Brannon and Braga titled "These are the Voyages" which is nothing more than a rather stale Star Trek: The Next Generation holodeck episode in which the Enterprise characters are forced into the background while two overaged and overweight TNG characters take center stage and proceed to bastardize the Enterprise we were just getting to know and appreciate after such a wonderful season. My suggestion: Buy the DVD set but don't bother watching the last episode to avoid a huge let-down.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Sweet_Gemma on April 6, 2006
Format: DVD
It is a bittersweet symphony, this unfortunately, last season of ST - Enterprise. It contains some of the best episodes of the series, but also the worst one of possibly the whole franchise- "These are the Voyages", titled as "Valentine for fans" by the writers, but it was the exact opposite of that, a slap in the face of those who liked Enterprise and its crew as well as the cast. I won't go into detail, this episode may have been average as a stand-alone one in the middle of a season, but as a finale it was just bad. Totally ignoring any character development established in the previous seasons, only a 1-hour finale instead of the established 2-hours, but to bring more insult, bringing in two characters from TNG and delegating Enterprises' own cast to the rank of gueststars. I didn't need a farewell to the whole franchise, I wanted a fair farewell to Enterprise and we didn't get that.

As for the rest of the season, it contains gems like "Home", "Demons", "Terra Prime" and the Vulcan-Arc trilogy "The Forge", "The Awakening" and "Kir'Shara".

Enterprise was in my opinion the best of all Trek series. While many Trekkers might disagree, I think it was the most human Trek and most suited for the casual viewer, not only the die-hard fan.

The DVDs are what you come to expect of Paramount, the extras are okay, but not as generous as the previous seasons, the bloopers are painfully short. Although as expensive as the rest of the bunch , I think it is well worth the money.

I wish it wouldn't have been cut short.

Goodbye Star Trek - Enterprise,

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