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Star Trek - The Next Generation, Episode 138: Ship in a Bottle [VHS]

4.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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(Jun 02, 1998)
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Product Details

  • Actors: LeVar Burton, Gates McFadden
  • Directors: LeVar Burton, Gates McFadden, Gabrielle Beaumont, Robert Becker, Cliff Bole
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, NTSC
  • Language: English, French
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Paramount
  • VHS Release Date: June 2, 1998
  • Run Time: 46 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6304925107
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #430,202 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

While investigating a glitch in Data's "Sherlock Holmes" holodeck program, engineer Reg Barclay (the awkward recurring engineer played by Dwight Schultz) inadvertently releases Professor Moriarty (Daniel Davis) from the ship's memory. Moriarty, the sentient holodeck character created in episode 29, "Elementary, Dear Data," is alive, bored, and singularly frustrated by Picard's lack of action: he wants off the holodeck so bad he steps over the threshold and into the real world by sheer will. His problem is bringing out his digital lover (Stephanie Beacham) with him, and he hijacks the Enterprise (perched on the event horizon of a forming star that threatens to engulf the vessel) to pressure the crew into finding a solution. The ingenious Chinese box of a story is like a series of interlocking mind games and makes for a delicious battle of wits: things are not always as they seem. Davis's Moriarty is not exactly the criminal mastermind of Doyle's books ("He was only written that way," pooh-poohs his elegant love interest), but he is a genius and a charismatic opponent, and writer Rene Echevarria pens a plot and a character worthy of such a creation. --Sean Axmaker

From the Back Cover

After enjoying a Sherlock Holmes mystery on the holodeck, Data (Brent Spiner) and Geordi (LeVar Burton) accidentally release the villainous Professor Moriarty (Daniel Davis), who has been trapped in the computer for four years. An exam reveals that the professor is in fact a sentient human being.

Though Moriarty relishes his new surroundings, he misses his beloved (Stephanie Beacham) and asks Picard (Patrick Stewart) to bring her to life as well. When Picard refuses, Moriarty threatens to destroy the ship. Then Data makes a startling discovery - the entire experience is a holodeck simulation controlled by Moriarty. Unfortunately, the danger is no less real, and the Enterprise will be destroyed unless they can escape from this "ship in a bottle".

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on October 9, 2000
This is one of my favorite episodes, and I think this sequel to "Elementary, Dear Data" was even better than the original. The solution at the end was thought-provoking and creative. After seeing this episode, one must wonder what how we really know that anything is real. Perhaps we are just a hologram????
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After encountering some anomolies in their Sherlock Holmes adventure, Geordi & Data ask Lt. Barclay to look at the Holodeck for problems. It's amazing that they were running the Holmes program, and yet Data didn't even seem to remember about Dr. Moriarty. In a previous episode, Dr. Polaski challenged Data, saying that he couldn't solve a genuine mystery, but only ones he had already read. Geordi inadvertently told the computer to create a character capable of defeating Data instead of defeating just Holmes. Moriarty became self aware (something that holographic characters aren't supposed to do) and essentially became alive.

This was prior to Barclay's service on Enterprise, so he is shocked to find this character in protected memory that knows he's a hologram and asks for Picard by name. Daniel Davis (known also as the British Butler on "The Nanny" series) is superb as the diabolical genius - criminal and debonair, mischieveous, yet polite - Sherlock Holmes' literary nemesis, Dr. Moriarty. He wants to have freedom from the confines of the Holodeck and is rightfully angered that he has been forgotten and claims he has experienced the passage of time while in limbo in the computer's memory.

No longer trusting of Picard's promises, Moriarty takes control of the ship, endangering her crew as she falls into the gravity well of a newly formed star. Moriarty has Picard running around like "a rat in a maze" and forms an ingenious ruse to get his demands met.

With full control of the ship in the hands of Moriarty, Picard must find a way to appease his apparently scientifically impossible requests.
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An interesting MELDING of the late 1800's and the future world of Inter Galactic Travel. Very nicely handled concerning both worlds, but to Sherlock Holmes fans more importantly, concerning the dress and settings which of course were all too brief for those who like Victorian settings.
This episode of Star Trek The Next Generation is the completion (or maybe not?) or at least the next installment of the Sherlock Holmes episode begun in episode #29. As such, it was a welcome addition to the first half as any Sherlock Holmes fan will tell you, that is if they liked the first part, which my wife and I did. I am NOT a Trekkie we just enjoy MOST of the Sherlock Holmes related films that we have seen. For those who like the actors in The Next Generation series or those who like Sherlock Holmes films, both will enjoy this continuation. The setting, the story, the actors, the quality were all enjoyable.
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with Daniel Davis playing Dr. Moriarty, Lt. Data's "Shirlock Holmes'" arch enemy. One of the best story lines written by the staff of TNG. Episode 138 is a sequel to Episode 29, "Elementary, Dear Data" from the 1st season. The ending to this episode will have you wishing there were another season of TNG to make yet another sequel.
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While Data and Geordi are role-playing in the Holodeck as Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, the Holodeck malfunctions. Geordi and Data quit the program and ask Barclay to inspect the program when Holmes' arch-enemy appears right in front of Barclay, requesting to speak to Captain Picard about leaving the Holodeck. Moriarty successfully leaves the Holodeck later on, but is this for real? This story is a sort of sequel to the 2nd season episode "Elementary, Dear Data," but I like the 2nd season episode better because it has humor and just a little more suspense, I think, than "Ship in a Bottle."
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