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Star Trek: Khan - Ruling in Hell Paperback – April 19, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: Star Trek
  • Paperback: 104 pages
  • Publisher: IDW Publishing; Reprint edition (April 19, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1600109098
  • ISBN-13: 978-1600109096
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 6.6 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #631,325 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Chris S. Jackson on April 21, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I greatly enjoyed this latest trade paperback from IDW. It fills in the missing years between The Space Seed and Star Trek II:The Wrath of Khan. It shows the enviromental destruction of Ceti Alpha V and Khan's descent to madness. I thought the art and dialogue was good and had an engaging story. I would recommend this, especially for the great price!
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Babytoxie on July 23, 2011
Format: Paperback
STAR TREK: KHAN - RULING IN HELL collects the 4-issue miniseries that tells the story of what happened to Khan Noonien Singh and his followers between the Original Series TV episode "Space Seed" and the movie Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. IDW has again called upon the writing team of Scott and David Tipton to chronicle events outside of those seen in the original Star Trek. The problem with this miniseries is that it's really not necessary, for in Star Trek II, Khan gave a fairly detailed account of what happened to his group after the conclusion of "Space Seed": the explosion of Ceti Alpha VI and the resulting environmental shift of Ceti Alpha V, the ceti eel infestation, the loss of his wife, and his increasing rage at Captain Kirk for not coming to their rescue. Unlike many other original Trek stories from IDW, this one was all laid out for the writers. Not that the Tiptons don't do a decent job of expanding on it, but if you're familiar with the original episode and the movie, there's really nothing new here - no surprises, no twist ala John Byrne - just a depiction of events with which most are already familiar. In addition, the driving conflict in the book between Khan and one of his followers, Tamas, is never adequately explained. I had a hard time understanding just exactly what Tamas hoped to accomplish, and it nagged at me more and more the further I got into the book.

Anyhow, the Tiptons do an excellent job at constructing dialogue that fits well with Khan's character, and artist Fabio Mantovani very ably captures the looks of both the original followers and the new followers spolighted in the film - nice to see Joachim in the group. As the individual issues read fairly quickly, it didn't take much time to finish this collection. That definitely made me question the cost of the book, but it's always fun to revisit the Star Trek universe.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Hugo Dart on December 5, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The story is weak, and adds nothing to what we already knew about the characters. The central conflict sounds artificial from beginning to end, and it seems to be there only because the writer found they had nothing to write about.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rocky Sunico on August 14, 2013
Format: Paperback
As a whole, the series aims to bridge the gap between the events of the TOS episode "Space Seed" and the movie Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. Considering the rather amicable end to Khan's taking control of the Enterprise in the TV series, it was an interesting angle to try and explain how things went from a civilized resolution to outright hatred to the very core of Khan's being as seen in the movie.

Things seem simple enough with the Botany Bay being set down on Ceti Alpha V. Despite the dangers of the planet, Khan was determined to prove himself worth of the challenge of taming the world and establishing a new empire for himself. The comics go on to show some of the internal conflict among the Augments as a rival faction began to ferment unrest and eventually go on to challenge Khan's rule. But of course we all know that eventually a catastrophic event alters the planet's orbit and turns it from a dangerous jungle to a desert wasteland. It's quite the transition indeed.

I do appreciate the efforts to continually present Khan as the cultured and almost benevolent dictator that he is. After all, his role as their leader stems from the knowledge that he is far superior to all others, even his fellow Augments. And in this regard the writers certainly get credit in their efforts to script their Khan as close as possible to Ricardo Montalban's original portrayal of the character. And that's never an easy thing to do - but I think it's safe to say that the writers managed to get us most of the way there while our imaginations took over from that point.

Admittedly some of the internal struggles between the Augments seemed ridiculously petty.
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