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A Star Trek: The Next Generation: Time #8: A Time to Heal Mass Market Paperback – September 1, 2004

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About the Author

David Mack is the New York Times bestselling author of more than twenty-five novels, including the Star Trek Destiny and Cold Equations trilogies. He co-developed the acclaimed Star Trek Vanguard series and its sequel, Star Trek: Seekers. His writing credits span several media, including television (for episodes of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine), film, short fiction, magazines, comic books, computer games, and live theater. He currently resides in New York City.
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Product Details

  • Series: Star Trek: The Next Generation (Book 8)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books/Star Trek (September 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743491785
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743491785
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.1 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,065,848 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

DAVID MACK is the New York Times bestselling author of more than twenty-five novels and novellas, including the STAR TREK DESTINY and COLD EQUATIONS trilogies. He developed the STAR TREK VANGUARD series with editor Marco Palmieri. His first original novel was the critically acclaimed supernatural thriller THE CALLING.

Beyond novels, Mack's writing credits span several media, including television (for episodes of STAR TREK: DEEP SPACE NINE), film, short fiction, magazines, newspapers, comic books, computer games, radio, and live theater.

His latest published novels include the best-selling A CEREMONY OF LOSSES; book one of STAR TREK: SEEKERS, a new original series; and the STAR TREK spy-thriller SECTION 31: DISAVOWED. His novelette "And Hell Rode With Her" is included in the new anthology APOLLO'S DAUGHTERS, available from Silence in the Library Publishing.

Upcoming projects by David Mack include THE MIDNIGHT FRONT, a World War II-era fantasy adventure, and a pair of new STAR TREK novels.

Mack resides in New York City with his wife, Kara. Visit his official web site, http://www.davidmack.pro/ and follow him on Twitter @davidalanmack.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Tess Wallace on December 30, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When I say a book is "daring," I don't mean it's perfect. This one isn't. Its biggest shortcoming is the utter implausibility of Starfleet's final answer the crimes of the Federation president. And you really have to have a strong stomach or an appreciation for descriptions of graphic injury and violence to get through this book's more brutal passages. David Mack's writing is sometimes shockingly vivid, enough to make one wince at times. There's also no escaping what this book and the one before it, A TIME TO KILL, are really about: the 2003 U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq. The analogy seems plain -- but thinner and not as well-disguised with SF ideas as such episodes of the 1960s STAR TREK series as "A Private Little War" or "A Taste of Armageddon."

But if those are the things that A TIME TO HEAL did wrong, what did it do right? For one thing, even though it used current events as a template, it didn't take sides. Even the so-called villains have reasonable motives, if self-serving or misguided. Mack's portrayal of the tragedies of war, the horrors of combat, and the senselessness of violence is stirring and provocative. He challenges his readers' conceptions of the NEXT GENERATION characters as "pure" or "morally spotless" by putting them in situations where they must make really hard choices between doing the ethical thing and paying a terrible price, or bending their rules little by little in order to stave off disasters, only to find themselves suddenly knee-deep in compromise and complicity.

Another excellent element of this book is its use of supporting characters. The "little people" on the ship come to life in lots of well-dramatized incidents that give them personalities.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mateo on October 25, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have enjoyed the A Time to books, some more so than others. A time to kill was great because it showed some cool commando and more hands on stuff which is sometimes a rarity in the star trek universe,except for DS9, which was as close to realistic as Star Trek got.

However, while i enjoyed the story the whole ending of getting rid of the President of the Federation and his aids by Section 31 was a little unbelievable. If Bill Clinton or George Bush (Senior and W.) disappeard tomarrow and were never heard from again I think people would start asking questions. I just can`t believe that the President of the Federation resigns and is never heard from again and no one is the wiser. Also, while Deep Space Nine did put a darker edge on the Star Trek series everyone for the most part stuck to their morals. These last two books have basically made the Federation just as bad (Schemers, liars and muderers) as the Romulans. It sort of takes away that cool innocence that Star Trek has. Star Trek seemed to try and show the good side of humanity and that the future holds promise and the Federation is above stuff like what happened in the books. So, its was a little out of character.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Sxottlan on August 17, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A Time to Heal is probably one of the darkest Trek novels I've ever read. The book is a decent read with a labyrinth political maze of shifting alliances. However at times, the twisting tale of murder and conspiracy can frankly overwhelm at times and can become flat-out depressing with its bleak look at politics.

Going purely on entertainment level (which is a big chunk of how I rate anything), A Time to Heal doesn't match its predecessor A Time to Kill in terms of suspense generated by the Clancy-esque tactics and political maneuvering. The book is an even more somber tome than the previous novel. David Mack does a pretty good job of keeping track of all the different threads and helps bring clarity to the different parties all looking after their best interests. As mentioned before, goals shift around, so one minute the new Tezwan government is helping Picard and company and the next working to subvert them, even though what they're doing is for the greater good.

Character development that's been evolving since A Time to be Born continues to good effect in the book as well. Most notable actually is Geordi LaForge, whose shaken faith in Starfleet and the Federation way back in the first book helps give rise to his suspicions about what's going on with the orders from Starfleet Operations. The great thing is that it feels completely natural within this mini-series. I was trying to think about the main characters, but there really isn't any one character that stands out. Even Picard is mostly in the background. If anything, I'd say that the characters that get the most attention are Kell Perim and Jim Peart. Perim's arch in these two books seems to be the first casualty of Nemesis as since she didn't appear in the film, a reason had to be found for her not being there.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Antoine D. Reid VINE VOICE on September 25, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Heal," the eighth novel in the "A Time to..." series, continues the journey from The Next Generation's Star Trek: Inssurection adventure to the striking and noticable differences seen in the last feature film, Star Trek: Nemesis. The previous book, "Kill," was also written by David Mack and features the troubled worlf of Tezwa and the chaotic war-frenzy that seems to engulf it's people and the Federation. Caught in the middle is the Enterprise and Starfleet, left to clean up a political mess and save an entire world from tearing itself apart.

Reading "A Time to Kill," I was taken in by the Klingon side of things. Basically, without spoiling too much, the Klingons have a bone to pick with the world of Tezwa and it leads to a September 11 situation. What I felt wasn't dealt with, from the get-go, was the result of Worf's actions and how the Klingons were recovering from such a defeat (you have to see the loss of thousands as a major defeat, even for the warrior-driven Klingons). "Heal" though is a story all within itself. Sure, there are early mentionings of a few consequences that came with Worf's decisions in the previous book but the Klingons, for the most part, are not involved in "Heal." It leaves this particular duology with a sense that it's incomplete. The Worf and the Klingons do seem to play a role in the last book of the series, but as a reader, I wanted to know how the Klingons dealt with the big events in "Kill."

As for the rest of the book, it is, in my opinion, one of the top Next Generation tales. It is all about being challenged and accepting change, a theme that seems to run rampant in the "A Time to..." series. Each character is given their time in the spotlight.
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