Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Beach House $5 Off Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Shop Popular Services gotS5 gotS5 gotS5  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Metal Gear Solid 5 Shop Now STEM Toys & Games
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by Hayle Sales and Fulfilled by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Star Trek - The Original ... has been added to your Cart
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Star Trek - The Original Series, Episode 77: The Savage Curtain [VHS]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Star Trek - The Original Series, Episode 77: The Savage Curtain [VHS]

7 customer reviews

>
Additional VHS Tape options Amazon Price New from Used from
VHS Tape
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$24.95
$7.99 $0.15

Start Your 30-Day Free Trial of Amazon Prime
Start Your 30-Day Free Trial of Amazon Prime Stream thousands of movies & TV shows anytime, anywhere. Start your free trial
$24.95 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by Hayle Sales and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Product Details

  • Actors: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Nichelle Nichols, Bill Blackburn
  • Directors: Herschel Daugherty
  • Writers: Gene Roddenberry, Arthur Heinemann
  • Producers: Edward K. Milkis, Fred Freiberger, Gene Roddenberry, Gregg Peters
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, HiFi Sound, NTSC
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: CBS Paramount International Television
  • VHS Release Date: April 15, 1994
  • Run Time: 46 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6300988732
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #287,291 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Perhaps best known as the episode in which Abraham Lincoln is seen, rather absurdly, floating through space in a big ol' presidential chair, "The Savage Curtain" is one of those death-match shows in which a busybody alien wants to witness true human(oid) mettle in an arranged battle. Lincoln asks Captain Kirk (William Shatner) and Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy) to accompany him to a planet where Excalbians have organized a fight between good (Kirk's party plus a Vulcan icon) and evil (Genghis Khan, Kahless the founder of the Klingon Empire, and two guys you never heard of). The derivative, obvious story was half-written by Gene Roddenberry and dumped on another writer, Arthur Heinemann, after Roddenberry pulled back from Star Trek in its third season. Heinemann added some interesting moral underpinnings, but this is one of those instances in which a good television show seems to be mimicking itself. On the plus side, the show gives Sulu (George Takei) a rare opportunity to command the Enterprise bridge--experience that surely served him well later as a Starfleet captain in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. --Tom Keogh

From the Back Cover

Kirk, Spock, Abraham Lincoln and Surak must fight four of history's greatest tyrants in a battle of good and evil staged by the Excalbians.

TREK TRIVIA
Lee Bergere (Lincoln) later appeared as Joseph, the head of the household staff, in TV's long-running series Dynasty.
In this episode, Sulu is left in charge of the bridge, foreshadowing things to come in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.

Customer Reviews

5 star
0%
4 star
100%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Geekier than thou TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 8, 2004
Looks like the latter to me! While surveying a planet that has a poisonous atmosphere and is covered with molten lava, sensors reveal an artificial atmosphere and a patch of ground that resembles earth. What their eyes see on the view screen and what their sensors read are not jibing.

Uhura sends hails in all frequencies with no response. Just as they're ready to break orbit, the ship is probed by some sort of beam whose source is unknown. Then, without explaination, Abraham Lincoln is right in front of their ship, wearing his stove pipe hat and sitting in a large chair reminiscent of the Lincoln Memorial.

There he is, floating in space, talking to Kirk like he knows him. Lincoln is not freaked out by being in space and encountering a space ship with aliens and even knows the crew by name without being introduced, but is freaked out by taped music he hears aboard the ship when he is beamed over. Pulleease!

Kirk is trippin' - here is his childhood hero, President Linoln - he knows that Lincoln has been dead for over 3 centuries (in Star Trek time), but believes that this image of Lincoln believes that he is Lincoln. Whatever! Kirk makes everyone get in dress uniform. For some reason, this means Scotty wears a kilt, purse and the whole Scottish regalia. This simply doesn't make sense - unless someone wants to explain it to me. I know Scotty is supposed to be Scottish, but he's a member of the Federation, not the Scottish Space Agency. You don't see Sulu wearing a Samurai uniform or Spock in a robe. The dress uniforms are extremely cheesy, but they do look a tad dressier than their normal dress. They really improved the look of the dress uniforms on Next Generation, thank goodness.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "scoobie@intergate.ca" on November 22, 2002
This is a difficult episode to rate. It is very uneven, seems rushed, maybe everyone was having a bad week but any Trek fan will know the third season was hell for all involved.
But I think it is better than most think. It is actually a wonderful story, it is just limited by budget and admittedly heartless acting. This could have been a masterpiece if done better , but it still deserves a look.
I lo ve the spooky music <tho it is somewhat repeptitive, one of Star Trek's greatest faults I think> and Yarnek is pretty spooky looking if you are in a dark room and not taking things too seriously.
If you are a Trek fan, I believe this is worthy of collection. This episode seems to air very rarely; I don't know why. Give it a chance.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brian Overland on August 16, 2007
The premise is goofy. Abraham Lincoln appears and invites Kirk and Spock to beam down. There they are forced to fight against some of the great villains in history, including Ghengis Kahn. The rock-like aliens of the planet don't understand Earth concepts of good and evil, so they stage a fight to see which is strongest.

Kirk, Spock, and Lincoln are joined by Surak, the founder of Vulcan philosophy. Surak is a total pacificist. He is gracious toward the Earthmen, though a bit formal. Despite the impossibility of a pacificist solution, Surak insists on suing for peace, and Spock argues that he must be given a chance to do so.

Credit must be given to Roddenberry for tackling a perennially difficult issue for liberals: is it better to adopt the Ghandi-like tactics of Surak, or to defend what is right as Lincoln did, at the cost of many lives? Making things difficult is that the bad guys have no problem with taking human life. In this episode, the good guys must ultimately stand and fight. But the idealism of Surak is not shown to be completely invalid. Indeed, the final words of the episode are "There is still plenty of their work [Surak's and Lincoln's] to do in the galaxy." Surak was surely a brave man (er, Vulcan).

Note: This episode inspired a memorable episode of the BBC series "Red Dwarf." In that story, a planet contains a museum of animated wax figures of famous Earthlings. For some reason, the musuem is empty and the wax figures have run amok, providing another showdown between the good guys and bad guys of history -- with the good guys at an apparent disadvantage because some of them are pacifists like Ghandi.

Another note: One of the bad guys in this Trek episode is Kahless the Unforgettable, the founder of the Klingon empire.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Charles Ashbacher HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 18, 2004
The major premise of this episode is intellectual curiosity, although in this case the curiosity is exhibited by alien creatures made of liquid rock that live on a volcanic planet. They probe the minds of the Enterprise crew and from Kirk's they create a facsimile of Abraham Lincoln as an emissary to the Enterprise. Lincoln is beamed aboard and is treated as a visiting dignitary. He demonstrates all of Lincoln's charm, wisdom and humor and Kirk is taken with him. Lincoln then asks Kirk and Spock to beam down to the surface of the planet with him. After reflection, they agree and beam down to an area on the planet that has been made suitable for human habitation. Once there, they discover Surak, a Vulcan revered for his principles of nonviolence, the founder of the Vulcan way of logic, and a hero plucked from Spock's mind.
A rock creature called Yarnek appears and conjures up four people from history considered to be the epitome of evil. The four evil ones are then to battle against the four "good guys", in an experiment so that Yarnak's species can learn which is stronger, good or evil. To guarantee compliance, Yarnak vows to destroy the Enterprise if good is defeated. Surak and Lincoln are killed, but in the ensuing battle, the evil ones are defeated and the survivors flee. Yarnak returns and is puzzled and disappointed by the results. He feels that they have learned nothing of the difference, although he releases the Enterprise.
The choice of of the four evil ones puzzles me. They are Ghengis Khan, Khalis, the founder of the Klingon Empire, and two others that are unknown. My first choice would have been Adolf Hitler, and I will always wonder why they did not make that choice. Perhaps his time does not go back far enough into history for the producers to consider it appropriate.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: vhs tapes for sale

Hayle Sales Privacy Statement Hayle Sales Shipping Information Hayle Sales Returns & Exchanges