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Star Trek - The Original Series, Episode 41: I, Mudd [VHS]

4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, Nichelle Nichols, Roger C. Carmel
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, HiFi Sound, NTSC
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: CBS Paramount International Television
  • VHS Release Date: July 29, 1991
  • Run Time: 46 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6300213455
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #323,522 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

episode 41

Amazon.com

Lovable scoundrel Harry Mudd (Roger C. Carmel) returns following his debut appearance in the first-season episode "Mudd's Women," this time as the leader of a race of helpful (and leggy) androids. Mudd tries to take control of the Enterprise, but soon finds that the androids have plans of their own. This is one of Trek's few purely comic episodes, and it hits a nice level of whimsy as Kirk and the crew fight android efficiency with good old human illogic. "I, Mudd" also sets a benchmark achievement for the Star Trek design crew: It called not just for beautiful women in revealing costumes, but for beautiful twins in revealing costumes. Truly a tough one to top, cheesily foreshadowing the "Fembots" of Austin Powers infamy. --Ali Davis

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: VHS Tape
This episode is a wonderful comedy, utilizing self-satire more than the popular "Tribbles" yet doing so far less clumsily than "Spock's Brain" -- the latter being unintentionally funny and therefore painful. "I, Mudd" is a knowing satire of science fiction in general and of Star Trek in particular.

Basically, the crew of the Enterprise is captured by a race of well-meaning but tyranical androids. Up until now, the androids' only experience with Earthlings has been a chance meeting with Harry Mudd -- the comic villain from the first season, a colorful liar, slob, schemer and con man. The joke here is that with Mudd as the example of homo sapiens, they conclude that they must serve humanity by traveling throughout the galaxy and enslaving Earthlings for their own good. They start by taking away the freedom of Mudd as well as the crew of the Enterprise. They will use the ship to go enslave Earth.

Anyone who's familiar with Isaac Asimov's three laws of robotics may recognize the philosophical point being made. Robots must serve humanity, it's part of their programming. Yet there is one robot law that is even higher: a robot must not fail to save human life, even if this means disobeying an order. Even today, would this ethical programming direct robots to rule over us for our own good, to save us from ourselves?

This theme, though not dwelt over in an academic way, is implicit in the writing of almost every scene. Human welfare depends on happiness, and happiness is ultimately impossible without freedom, even though freedom allows us to choose a path that often leads to misery. The old argument about free will justifying pain.

In the end, Kirk and company form an alliance with Mudd.
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Format: VHS Tape
Norman, an android pretending to be a member of the U.S.S. Enterprise crew, takes control of the starship and her crew, taking them to an unnamed planet where Kirk discovers an old nemesis... Harry Mudd. Fleeing from his most recent criminal exploit, Harry crash-landed on the planet, which is inhabited by androids designed by a long-extinct race. At first their desire to fulfill his every need seemed like paradise, but Harry soon realized that precluded him ever leaving the planet. So, sending Norman to capture the U.S.S. Enterprise, Mudd hoped to trade the starship's crew for his own freedom. The androids, however, want to use the U.S.S. Enterprise as a vehicle to populate the universe, serving mankind and protecting them from themselves. Unwilling to spend their lives on the strange planet, waited on by machines, Kirk and company set about finding a way out. It is not without temptation, however. Spock is shown what is supposedly the control center for all the androids... a veritable electronics dream come true. McCoy is given an extensive lab, set up to do all the research he's ever wanted to do, while Scotty is shown the technical machine shop of his dreams. The androids offer Uhura eternal youth and beauty while Chekov contemplates a planet filled with beautiful young women. In the end, however, the crew bands together in an attempt to thoroughly confuse and, ultimately, short-circuit them. Through a series of illogical and very funny antics, the U.S.S. Enterprise crew and Mudd cause Norman, the central control for all the androids, to have an electronic "nervous breakdown." Instead of granting Harry Mudd his freedom, Kirk leaves him on the planet with the remaining androids... including many fashioned in the image of his shrewish wife, Stella, until he mends his ways.
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Format: VHS Tape
I think the last 17 mins. {of humor}. makes it a buy, if you dont have it
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Format: VHS Tape
A new officer aboard the enterprise ends up crippling the Enterprise and forces it to fly at high warp toward an unknown planet. The crew is unable to stop their arrival as the officer has set a booby-trap that will make the Enterprise explode if they try to stop the ship. The rogue officer reveals that in addition to being a hottie, he is an android, a remarkably realistic android named Norman.

Norman beams Kirk, Bones, Spock, Uhura, & Chekov down to the planet where they meet the interstellar rogue and thief, Harcort "Harry" Mudd. There are over 200,000 androids on the planet, and all call Mudd their "Lord." Although they meet his every need, they will not let him leave the planet because they love to study human behavior. Being a poor example of human behavior, he gives a really poor first impression. They worship him (sort of) and serve his every need, everything but his freedom.

Mudd uses his knowledge to help the androids steal the Enterprise and get the whole ship's compliment to study - in exchange for his freedom. The androids, however, are lying bastards and intend to keep everyone trapped on the planet forever.

If keeping the crew trapped on the planet forever wasn't bad enough, they intend to use the Enterprise to roam the galaxy and enslave humankind to "protect" them from their own self-destructive behavior.

Being logical beings, they see things in black and white, not shades of grey - so there is no reasoning with them. Being androids, however, means they cannot cope with illogical input. When the crew figures this behavior out, they are able to confuse the crap out of the crew by doing an embarrassing dance and something akin to a Laurie Anderson performance to make them smoke up and become useless.
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