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  • Star Trek - The Original Series, Episode 66: Day Of The Dove [VHS]
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Star Trek - The Original Series, Episode 66: Day Of The Dove [VHS]


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Deal of the Week: Up to 62% Off "Monk: The Complete Series" on DVD and AIV
This 32-disc collection includes every episode from all 8 seasons with hours of behind-the-scenes bonus features, making Monk: The Complete Series a compulsively essential addition to any DVD obsessive’s collection. Learn more


Product Details

  • Actors: William Shatner, Michael Ansara, Susan Howard, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelly
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, HiFi Sound, NTSC
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: CBS Paramount International Television
  • VHS Release Date: July 29, 1991
  • Run Time: 46 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6300988627
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #556,019 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

"Captain's log. Stardate: Armageddon." Kirk's rather dramatic proclamation comes in the middle of a most unusual battle: Klingons and Federation crew members clash with gladiatorial broadswords and cutlasses on an Enterprise careening out of control. Michael Ansara guest stars as Kang, the fierce Klingon general who accuses Kirk of destroying his warship and killing hundreds of crewmen, while the Enterprise crew blames the Klingons for the brutal destruction of a human colony. Emotions are pitched into a racist frenzy and blood lust grips both crews as a mysterious being of pure energy (a psychedelic lightshow of shimmering colors) both feeds and feeds off their hatred. The Trek take on jingoism, race hatred, and the lies of war is actually more subtle than it first appears (compare the human and Klingon descriptions of one another's "common knowledge" atrocities--they're almost identical!), but nothing beats the sight of Kirk, Kang, and their crews laughing together in the show's first moment of interspecies male bonding. --Sean Axmaker

From the Back Cover

Aboard the Enterprise, Kirk and his crew battle with the Klingons, controlled by an unseen alien that feeds off their negative emotions.

TREK TRIVIA
"Day Of The Dove" features Mara, the first female Klingon; another would not be seen until the appearance of Valkris in Star Trek III: The Search For Spock.
Watch for an odd-looking shot of Sulu at the helm - it originally appeared three years earlier in "The Corbomite Maneuver"!

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 25, 1999
A U.S.S. Enterprise landing party beams to a human-colonized planet in answer to a distress call. A Klingon ship, apparently damaged, is detected and a group of Klingons accuse Kirk of having damaged their ship. Kang, their leader, claims the U.S.S. Enterprise as a prize and Kirk beams the Klingons on board, reluctantly. However, Spock is warned by Kirk and quickly takes the Klingons prisoner. Both ships seem to have received the same, false, distress call. A malevolent entity has entered into the U.S.S. Enterprise computer and excites both sides to aggressive behavior. It forces the ship out of control, rushing toward the galactic rim, while isolating a number of Klingons and U.S.S. Enterprise crew, heightening their sense of paranoia and violence turning them against each other. Phasers become swords and the battle begins. Spock finally realizes that the entity feeds off hatred and emotional excitation and has acted as a catalyst to provoke combat, keeping the numbers on both sides even. Kirk is able, in the end, to make a common-cause truce with the Klingons and they drive the creature out of the ship with their laughter.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "summersun5" on October 31, 2003
By the time this episode aired, NBC and Desilu had began to realize what TV viewers already knew: Star Trek's "Bottle Shows" -or those taking place entirely or mostly on the Enterprise- were frequently the best ones, and "Day of the Dove" was no exception.
This episode is Star Trek with it's powerful moral subtext at it's best, clearly showing the insanity of race hatred and the futility of war. It has great scenes and lines, beginning with the smack in the mouth Kirk receives from Kang, to the ending scene of Kirk, Kang, and company all making merry to drive out an evil alien that thrives on hate.
Special FX were also quite good for the day, and this episode features a Klingon Battle Cruiser getting blown to bits by the Enterprise (the only episode showing this). But, you won't see this on TV, this scene is frequently deleted in reruns to save time for more commercials. Get the tape!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 18, 1999
In the first-season episode "Errand of Mercy", the Organians impose a peace treaty upon the warring Federation and Klingon Empire. As they do this, they tell both Captain Kirk and Commander Kor that one day in the future, the Federation and the Klingons will become fast friends and work together. As we know, this did eventually come to pass with the Khitomer Peace Conference in Star Trek VI and with subsequent peace initiatives. But here, two years after "Errand of Mercy," we see the crew of the Enterprise and Commander Kang's crew *working together* to defeat the Beta XII-A alien.
I've read that they originally wanted John Colicos to reprise his role as Commander Kor in this one, which I think would have been fantastic, but Colicos was not available, though he supposedly really wanted to do it. Even so, Michael Ansara does a masterful job in portraying Commander Kang, and adds another interesting Klingon character to Star Trek lore, which has appeared again in both Deep Space Nine and Voyager.
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This episode has an excellent premise, yet the sheer stupidity of the protagonists diminishes it. The Enterprise is sent to investigate the destruction of a human colony on Beta XII-A and a Klingon battle cruiser also appears. Sensors aboard the Enterprise detect explosions on the Klingon ship and the survivors beam down to the surface of the planet and capture Kirk and the landing party. Suddenly, Chekov goes berserk and attacks the Klingon captain Kang. When Kirk apparently meekly surrenders, Kang is contemptuous of him.
However, Kirk has tricked him, Scotty beams up the Enterprise crew and holds the Klingons in stasis until security can arrive in the transporter room. Later, when Kirk is talking to his prisoner Kang, objects are transmuted into sword-like weapons. It is here where the foolishness begins. Spock points out that neither the Klingons or the Federation possesses a technology that can perform such transmutations. His logic falls on deaf ears as the people are being influenced by an energy creature that feeds off violent pain and emotion. It is clear that Kang is also a seasoned Klingon commander and he would quickly recognize that they were being manipulated.
In desperation, Kirk tries to reason with Mara, the wife of Kang and the science officer of the Klingon ship. He convinces her, but when Kirk beams to where Kang is located, the physical battle continues. Finally, Kang is convinced that the fight is pointless and together, Kirk and Kang order their people to cease fighting. Spock suggests that an expression of joviality would be an effective weapon, so after a bit of jocularity, the creature leaves the ship.
This episode is saved by the excellent performances of Michael Ansara as Kang and Susan Howard as his wife Mara.
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