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Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice #18: The Threat Within Paperback – March 1, 2002

4.3 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Pax
Pax
A compelling novel about the powerful relationship between a boy and his fox. "Pax" is destined to become a classic, beloved for generations to come. Hardcover | Kindle book
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Lexile Measure: 700L (What's this?)
  • Series: Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice (Book 18)
  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks (March 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439139376
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439139373
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #838,868 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Hello! Thanks for clicking. I'm Jude Watson, and I write for kids. It's the best job in the world.

As a writer, I wear two hats. As Judy Blundell I write for Young Adults, and I won the National Book Award for my novel, WHAT I SAW AND HOW I LIED.

I write for middle-graders while wearing my Jude Watson hat, which is a bit more colorful. Maybe it even has a spinning propeller on top. I love to write mystery-adventures with thrilling twists and oddball characters and kids who find themselves in impossible situations doing incredible things.

I do all this from a chair, in a little room, in a not-big house, in a small town on Long Island. I like to read and I like to draw (badly) and my idea of excitement is to lace up my sneakers and walk to the harbor and back. I'm a nervous flyer and though I am respectful of the physics of modern aviation I also secretly suspect that it is only the unified belief of passengers that tons of metal can hurtle through the air that keeps a plane in flight. I am also not terribly comfortable on suspension bridges. And don't even ask me to go on a ferris wheel.

I am listing these fears just to clue you in: I'm a physical coward. I'm also a creature of habit. Once in awhile I go a little crazy and take a different route to the grocery store.

Still, I'll throw incredible amounts of danger at my characters. And I'll cackle maniacally while I do it.

Other random facts: During deadline periods I am deeply committed to popcorn and apples.

Every summer I go to Cape Cod, and every summer I wish I had a whole month there. I never do.

I am waiting for the day I'll see someone reading a book of mine in an airport or a train or a diner. I will most likely embarrass myself by cavorting and singing "That's ME!"

If you want to learn more about me or take a look at my books, visit my website, judewatsonbooks.com. Until then, happy reading!

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
First of all, I really enjoyed this book. Sure, at times the writing style was a little bland and the supporting characters a bit formulaic, but for me, the amount of emotional development in the main characters of Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan, and the quickly moving, descriptive plot completely made up for it. Many found this book in particular too reminiscent of earlier ones, particularly the whole Melida/Daan disaster. But I thought that having Obi-Wan reflect back on the horrors he saw there, and the huge rift between himself and Qui-Gon back then, made the similarities haunting rather than tedious, and added a heightened sense of drama to the overall story. It also showed how much Obi-Wan's matured over the past few years, in his willingness to never let anything like that happen again. Anyway, in this book Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon are sent on a mission to Vorzyd 4, a planet on the edge of war with it's neighbor, Vorzyd 5, whom they are certain are the culprits of the resent terrorist attacks on their cities. As soon as they get there however, it's clear that everything is not as it seems... At the same time, Qui-Gon is beginning to become aware of the fact that Obi-Wan is growing up, and that the time they have left together is short, and this pains him terribly. Anyway, this is definitely a must for those of you who've been following the series. There is one more book after this, another split "special edition" adventure that features first Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon, and then later Obi-Wan and a young Anakin. Here's to that one being even better!
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Format: Paperback
It is hard to really say something specific about the book, because it presented me with many conflicting feelings.
At the start it had almost the feeling of a return to the earlier books, where Obi Wan would face an unknown quest on an unfamiliar world, but then it turns into a stop-and-go, where the earlier books were just crammed full of story, and moved forwards at all times.
I had the feeling that the book wanted to say much more than it could in the end. The series is coming to an end, while the padawan-master relationship isn't, not yet for several years.
There is much reflection on earlier experiences, and at times I had the same feeling as I had during the Melida/Daan books. Towards the end it felt like the hopelessness and the pointlessness of an act of violence like running a plane through an officebuilding, was repeated here to make a point, which I believe is already well-taken. It felt like an addition, that forced other scenes to be left out. Many things are unexplained in the end, many threads left fluttering.
What was the reason behind the retirees dying within weeks of their retirement? It felt like some sort of conspiracy, some dark secret at the start of the book, but it is left unexplained. There is a further remark made by the grandmother: "We are not allowed to show such silliness. Especially not now." Not now? Why? What changed? Pranks? Threats of war? Did not the fact that acts of silliness were not to be shown start the pranks in the first place? And did these not lead to threats of war?
Bryn's unhappiness is remarked upon, but never really explained.
Flip's turn to violence is explained, but what made Tray decide to nudge him into violence? She's the one with a true affection for her kin from first moment.
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By A Customer on March 10, 2002
Format: Paperback
First of all, I really enjoyed this book. Sure, at times the writing style was a little bland and the supporting characters a bit formulaic, but for me, the amount of emotional development in the main characters of Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan, and the quickly moving, discriptive plot completely made up for it. Many found this book in particuler too reminiscent of earlier ones, particulerly the whole Melida/Daan disaster. But I thought that having Obi-Wan reflect back on the horrers he saw there, and the huge rift between himself and Qui-Gon back then, made the similarities haunting rather than tedious, and added a hightened sense of drama to the overall story. It also showed how much Obi-Wan's matured over the past few years, in his willingness to never let anything like that happen again. Anyway, in this book Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon are sent on a mission to Vorzyd 4, a planet on the edge of war with it's neighbor, Vorzyd 5, whom they are certain are the culprits of the resent terrorist attacks on their cities. As soon as they get there however, it's clear that everything is not as it seems... At the same time, Qui-Gon is beginning to become aware of the fact that Obi-Wan is growing up, and that the time they have left together is short, and this pains him terribly. Anyway, this is definitely a must for those of you who've been following the series. There is one more book after this, another split "special edition" adventure that features first Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon, and then later Obi-Wan and a young Anakin. Here's to that one being even better!
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Format: Paperback
I realize that a number of people did not enjoy this book. I, however, did. I supose that it all depends on what you are looking to get out of the book. If you are looking for character developement, realationships, and interaction, as I was, then you will be very pleased. However, if you are looking for an outstanding plot with twists and complexity, then you might be dissapointed. (Let's keep in mind that these are still children's books; once I admitted that, I think I enjoyed them more, because I did not expect as much.)
This book had what I was looking for, namely, the final eveolution of Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan's relationship as Jedi and good friends. The story itself was a bit lacking, but I thought that if I was going to read it as an adult and demand the satisfaction of an adult book from it, then maybe the book shouldn't have to do all of the work: that, as an adult reading a book written by an adult, I should be able to read between the lines and get a feeling for the more advaced themes of the book.(I once read an interview where Juse Watson admitted that adults really did have to read betweent the lines with the JA books, because she had to target them to kids.
When closly examined, The Threat From Within had many mature and serious aspects. For example, the characters reflected upon past actions and experiences and applied them to the present situation; in this way we see them change. This is a classics technique in character developement, which brings together all of the books and makes the character's past more real. It was comforting to know that experiences such as Obi-Wan's leaving of the Jedi and people such as Talh did not fade out of existence, as things tend to do in other series. Another serious issue was that the kids didnt know when to stop playing pranks. They started out good, but ended up divided, as on Medlinda/Daan. And, I must point out that history DOES repeat itself, so the plot was all the more true-to-life for being similar.
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