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Star Wars Tales of the Jedi: Dark Lords of the Sith Audio, Cassette – Abridged, July 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Series: Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi
  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: HighBridge Audio (July 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565111990
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565111998
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,421,634 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Tom Veitch is an American writer, best known for his contributions to the Dark Horse line of Star Wars comicbook titles, notably Dark Empire and Tales of the Jedi. For DC Comics Veitch wrote Animal Man, along with two Elseworlds series featuring Kamandi and an elder Superman. Tom Veitch was a major contributor to the underground comix movement of the late sixties and early seventies. His collaborations with Underground Comix artist Greg Irons in the early 1970s (the creative team known as "'GI/TV"') included such titles as "'Legion of Charlies"' and contributions to many other underground comix including "'Skull Comix"' and "'Slow Death Funnies"'. Creator-owned comics by Veitch include: The Light and Darkness War with artist Cam Kennedy (from Marvel Comics). Other creator-owned comics series written by Veitch are The Nazz with artist Bryan Talbot' Clash with artist Adam Kubert' and My Name Is Chaos with artist John Ridgway (all published by DC).

Kevin J. Anderson is the author of more than ninety novels, 43 of which have appeared on national or international bestseller lists. He has over 20 million books in print in thirty languages. He has won or been nominated for numerous prestigious awards, including the Nebula Award, Bram Stoker Award, the SFX Reader’s Choice Award, the American Physics Society’s Forum Award, and New York Times Notable Book. By any measure, he is one of the most popular writers currently working in the science fiction genre. His STAR WARS “Jedi Academy” books were the three top-selling SF novels of 1994. His three original STAR WARS anthologies—TALES FROM THE MOS EISLEY CANTINA, TALES FROM JABBA’S PALACE, and TALES OF THE BOUNTY HUNTERS are the best-selling science fiction anthologies of all time. He has also completed numerous other projects for Lucasfilm, including the 14-volumes in the bestselling and award-winning YOUNG JEDI KNIGHTS series (cowritten with his wife Rebecca Moesta). Anderson is the author of three hardcover novels based on the X-FILES' all became international bestsellers, the first of which reached #1 on the London Sunday Times. Anderson recently worked with DC Comics to publish THE LAST DAYS OF KRYPTON, an epic science fiction novel that reveals the never-before-told story of the end of Superman’s planet. He is currently writing another novel for DC, ENCOUNTER, telling the first meeting between Superman and Batman in the 1950s during the Cold War. Anderson has scripted numerous bestselling comics and graphic novels, including Justice Society of America for DC, Star-Jammers for Marvel, Star Wars and Predator for Dark Horse, X-Files for Topps, and Star Trek for Wildstorm. Anderson’s research has taken him to the top of Mount Whitney and the bottom of the Grand Canyon, inside the Cheyenne Mountain NORAD complex, into the Andes Mountains and the Amazon River, inside a Minuteman III missile silo and its underground control bunker, onto the deck of the aircraft carrier Nimitz, to Maya and Inca temple ruins in South and Central America, inside NASA’s Vehicle Assembly Building at Cape Canaveral, onto the floor of the Pacific Stock Exchange, inside a plutonium plant at Los Alamos, and behind the scenes at FBI Headquarters in Washington, DC. He also, occasionally, stays home and writes.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 8, 1999
Format: Audio Cassette
Once again the nonstop thrilling actions and adventures of the jedi knights continues in its stunning glory. Here we have the oppertunity to understand how a jedi knight is seduced to the dark side of the force. Exar Kun, a young jedi knight in training has defied his jedi master by reading his holocran which contains forbidden knowledge of the dark power, particularly battle events and their outcome. Kun motivated by his curiousity of the dark side power, is taken advantage of by the spirit of the ancient fallen jedi Freedon Nad, who incidently brought the power of the Sith to Onderon, will quickly begin Kun's descent down the path of the dark side, by showing Kun the secrets of the Sith on Korriban and then on Yavin 4.
Amist the main battle yet to come there is a pinch of romance here too.
The sound effects and voice dictions are superbly well done. I highly recommend the audio version for a good long drive.
The ending is totaly climatic leaving you with a cliff hanger.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
Except issue 6. I think Kevin Anderson wrote this one, with the corny lines "HE HAS A SITH AMULET! THEY'RE DEADLY!" and "I wonder who that man is? I feel like I will learn much from him!" and "Dace is dead! I told him." The Jedi in the final issue seem to be Supermen, unfallable. The story shows a young Jedi turn to the Dark Side because of the death of his master and another Jedi, Exar Kun turn to the Dark Side because he was just plain dumb. No really, he was. His Jedi Master told him not to go looking into The Sith because he is too young. Maybe he should have listened to the crab Master, I mean he IS A MASTER right? The art is good, except for issue 6. I don't know what happened, but issue 6 can not be part of the series. It is just awful, awful writing and art. The lightsabers are blue sticks. Seriously, they put NO effect into them at all. The coloring is poor on everything too. When it shows lasers or effects, its just 2 colors and not a variety of colors.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Handofthrawn on August 20, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is the Tales of the Jedi story arc at an early stage, and in my opinion its best. The writing, while not great, is steady and constant. The art by Chris Gosset also helped make the comic, and his prescence in the last issue is sorely missed. The story is pretty good, especially for one that mishmeshes as much as this does. They do form an interesting parallel nonetheless, one enhanced by Goesset's artwork.
As I said, this is probably the strongest of the TotJ series. Its storyline is the best defined by far, and Gosset's art is very effective. The follow-up is a bit dissapointing, as is the rest of the series in my opinion. Still ,its a nice history lesson and a view into the ancient Jedi. Reccomended.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "fenderguy84" on June 8, 2000
Format: Paperback
If you're like me, you love it when the overwhelming power of the Dark Side is seething at every corner in the storywriting. If that's the case, then this book will make you go, "yyyyeeeeaaaahhhh!" It is an incredible setup for The Sith War, the next book in the series. If you watched The Empire Strikes Back (and who didn't) and you want to know more about why Yoda and Obi-Wan worried about Luke being turned to the Dark Side when trying to confront it, this contains a perfect example of a similar young Jedi who suffered that very fate. If you read this, I doubt you'll be able to resist picking up The Sith War. It leaves you on the edge of your seat saying, "Ooh! What happens next?" A definite must-read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 18, 1998
Format: Audio Cassette
Well, no one else has reviewed this yet, and I figured it was about time. IMHO, Full Cast Audio Dramas such as this one, are the only way to do comics! I really enjoy all the characters, Nomi in particular. There's something about her voice that just brings the character to life. I highly recomend this Audio Drama to all STAR WARS fans out there, especially those who don't normally like reading comics.
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By Kaiser on September 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is the best of the Tales of the Jedi series. Before you read it, you should at least read the first volume, titled simply Tales of the Jedi (sometimes with the subtitle Knights of the Old Republic, but that name now belongs to a video game series and a new monthly comic). It would also be good to read the short TotJ: The Freedon Nadd Uprising. The Golden Age of the Sith and the Fall of the Sith Empire predate this volume in the story chronology, but aren't necessary for understanding Dark Lords. (In fact, they should probably be avoided.)

Why is this the best? Veitch and Anderson's writing plays off each other, presenting the best of each and compensating for their weaknesses. The art in the first five chapters is fantastic, as are Dave Dorman's covers. The early TotJ stories have just enough implied backstory to hint at the larger world but it never leaves the reader confused. Korriban is one of my favorite Star Wars locations, and it was created here in crisp detail with millennia of history only hinted at.

What is lacking? The art in the sixth chapter is not so hot. The narration can be a bit comic-booky. Veitch was not involved in the subsequent volumes of TotJ, which are hit-and-miss. The Sith War is ultimately disappointing, but the Redemption of Ulic Qel-Droma was a fine coda to the series.
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