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Star Wars: The Essential Atlas Paperback – August 18, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: LucasBooks; Original edition (August 18, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345477642
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345477644
  • Product Dimensions: 12 x 8.9 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #31,571 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Daniel Wallace is the New York Times bestselling author of Star Wars: The New Essential Guide to Characters as well as a dozen more books that explore the underpinnings of the Star Wars universe, such as Star Wars: The New Essential Chronology and The Complete Star Wars Encyclopedia. He is a regular contributor to Star Wars Insider magazine and assembled the questions used in the Star Wars Trivial Pursuit game. In addition to his contributions to the galaxy far, far away, he has written for universes including Indiana Jones, Smallville, DC Comics, and Marvel Comics, with books including The Marvel Encyclopedia, The DC Comics Encyclopedia, and The Art of Superman Returns.

Jason Fry is a writer in Brooklyn, New York, where he lives with his wife, son, and about a metric ton of Star Wars stuff. He is the author of The Clone Wars Visual Guide, The Clone Wars: Ultimate Battles, and The Clone Wars: Official Episode Guide: Season 1, and has written extensively for the Star Wars Insider magazine and Wizards of the Coast.

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Customer Reviews

The pictures and maps alone make this book worth having.
Damasus of Seattle
My teenage son first saw this book at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum gift shop.
DRB
Just know that it really does read like a reference book.
Noname

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 34 people found the following review helpful By D. Hawk on August 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
Being both a Star Wars fan and a gamer, this book fills a niche that has needed filling ever since the huge slew of Expanded Universe material has been released. This book contains multiple maps of the SW galaxy, each broken down by specific region such as the Core Worlds and the Outer Rim, along with an assortment of worlds that play major roles in the movies as well as the EU material. But the real meat and potatoes of the book lies in the historical atlas section, which spans from ancient history (the Infinite Empire and Xim the Despot) all the way to the Corellian-Galactic Alliance conflict which is prominent in the Legacy of the Force series (also has a map of the era of the Legacy comic book series).

It's a very useful resource if you're confused on the sequence events in the various media released, such as the LOTF novels (as I have been multiple times), running a game of the Star Wars RPG, or if you're simply looking for a great read. I recommend this to any Star Wars fan!
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By John Bindas on November 24, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When I purchased this I didn't expect to be as impressed as I was. A guide like this is a difficult, painful undertaking. But Daniel Wallace and Jason Fry do an outstanding job of balancing history, raw geography, and interesting planetary data into an entertaining and incredibly useful guide.

The Galaxy Map in the first chapter alone is almost worth the price. Coupled with the grid system it introduces and the index in the back, locating just where a planet is becomes much simpler than hunting along the circles of the various sectors, hoping to stumble across the planet you're looking for. A larger poster of this would be an item I'd purchase a few copies of.

If you run Star Wars at all, you need this book. Hyperspace time calculations used to be a wild shot in the dark. With this in hand, you've finally got a logical route you can plan out. But even non-roleplayers will find this a handy reference and a good read.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By SB Crumb42 on September 12, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Back in 2002, "Star Trek Star Charts" was published. Like movie 1 and 5 and the worst episodes of the various series, that book became an example of how NOT to do it. In terms of the star charts, several systems and places were missing entirely, it was overly slim and skimpy, and it did not have a coordinate index.

The "Star Wars Atlas" (an update of 1998's Guide to Planets and Moons) corrects all of the Trek book's mistakes, expands upon its predecessor, and more.

It comes in three sections. Section 1 is a political discussion of that galaxy that almost competes with the best civics courses. The middle section is a selection of some 85 planets. Although there are no detailed planet maps, this lack is offset by fairly complete system descriptions. Section 3 is a long detailed historical atlas, with maps for each era and many topics. Finally, it ends with a very detailed coordinate index, the way any respectable atlas should.

The map of the galaxy is beautiful and detailed, it really should be made into a poster. Also, 'twould be nice to see a companion "planetary atlas" volume published someday. In the meantime, the current atlas is satisfactory, containing most of the stuff you'd ever need for the topic, and lots more besides.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Enjolras TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 24, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book because I wanted to start reading some of the Star Wars novels again, but was intimidated by how much the Expanded Universe has grown in the past decade. I remembered how much I liked the "essential" Star Wars guides when I was younger. Sadly, these books are also become somewhat redundant - with wikipedia - or Wookiepedia - nowadays, you can easily find information about the major Star Wars characters, species, and ships on the internet.

Fortunately, Star Wars: The Essential Atlas is different. Unlike many other "essential" books, it is actually pretty essential if you really want to understand the galaxy.This isn't simply a bunch of pretty pictures (like the The New Essential Guide to Vehicles and Vessels). Rather, it is a collection of maps demarcating the borders of the major political groups and plotting the routes the main characters took in the movies and Expanded Universe. Finally, you can see where Tatooine, Hoth, and Endor fall in relation to each other. This is particularly useful if you want to understand some of the more convoluted military campaigns, such as the Thrawn series. There's absolutely nothing on the web the provides this level of information and detail.

The book also has a section featuring several important planets - almost like the older The Essential Guide to Planets and Moons, but much better and with great renditions of the planets.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Yu-jin & Tracy Chia TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 1, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Though it's technically labeled as a new publication, not a revamp of the old 'essential' series, this is essentially a redux of the Essential Guide to Planets and Moons. I have that one too, and in this case (unlike most of the others) I can say with no reservations that it's a much better book. It includes many details missing from the old guide, such as population, imports/exports, number and type of moons, size of habitable planets, and species makeup. That's not all, though- the Atlas includes a general exposition on star travel, interstellar objects, tradelanes, a rundown of regions and politics, and a section on galactic history. There's also some amazingly detailed maps of the galaxy or galactic sectors, and- best of all- it's all in full color.

This book is one of the few out of the literally hundreds in print that I would say is a must-have for Star Wars fans. It'd be especially useful for those playing the Star Wars RPG. I've also bought the supplements for that game, and I must say that in many respects this is a much better (not to mention cheaper) resource. Whereas the Guide to Planets and Moons was more of a recap of events that took place in paperback novels, which just happened to organize it by worlds, this really is focused on the galaxy itself. Never has that been presented in such stunning detail; the charts alone are worth the price of admission.
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