Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Starr's Guide to the John Muir Trail and the High Sierra Region Paperback – June 12, 1964


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$84.72 $3.39
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Ty Cobb by Charles Leerhsen
Ty Cobb by Charles Leerhsen
Check out the newest book by Charles Leerhsen. Learn more | See related books

Editorial Reviews

Review

"More than a field guide, Starrs and Goin's book provides a social history of farming - and eating."--El Cerrito Patch

From the Inside Flap

Hardy, versatile and reliable, these pocket-sized guides are real wilderness experts. Totebooks "RM" -- the best guides in the field.
-- The Best About Backpacking
-- Fieldbook of Nature Photography
-- Hiker's Guide to the Smokies
-- Hiking the Yellowstone Backcountry
-- Plus other definitive guides to all your favorite hiking and climbing regions
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Sierra Club Totebook
  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Sierra Club Books; 12 edition (June 12, 1964)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0871561727
  • ISBN-13: 978-0871561725
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 0.5 x 6.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #337,330 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Candace Scott on March 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
There's no doubt that Robinson's guide is one of the great books written about the JMT, no one disputes this. It's nicely written, informative and gives background on the trail not found in other guides. However (and this is a huge "but"), this book is *not* useful for planning a present-day thru hike of the John Muir Trail. It was written in the mid 1930's and so much has changed in the intervening 70 years. Locations to trailheads, water sources and resupplying points and all drastically changed since 1936.
Most people who thru hike the JMT want all books every published about it, to remind ourselves of our accomplishment. This book definitely deserves a hallowed spot on your bookshelf, it just doesn't belong in your pack in these modern times.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By James H. Ward on December 19, 2002
Format: Paperback
Having grown up in the John Muir Wilderness as a Boy Scout, I can attest to the greatness of the guide. Its size and intricate, step ny step trial guidance is second-to-none. An absolute must-read for anyone even remotely contemplating a trek between Mount Whitney and Yosemite. Despite the fact that the information in the guide originates in the 1930's, it is still relevant today and provides a very sound planning tool for Scouters and "civilians" alike. I recommend it highly for another reason: It fits in the outer pocket of my backpack!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By patocaster on April 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
My dad and I hiked the length of the JMT many years ago. At that time Starr's Guide was invaluable. In terms of its accuracy, we encountered only one minor hiccup and it was probably our own fault. We didn't recognize Senger Creek when we passed it and we kept looking for it for a few miles when it was actually behind us. Hiking a few extra miles at the end of the day was hard but it all worked out as we took a layover day for some fishing on the middle fork of the San Joaquin River.

For more information on "Pete" Starr, check out William Alsup's book, "Missing in the Minarets: The Search for Walter A. Starr Jr."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
The problem with this guide is it was written in the 30's and the trailhead info is not totally reliable. For hardcore JMT fans this is a must-read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Craig K. Lehman on December 27, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Several of the reviews here complain about the descriptions in Starr's Guide being dated, but in reality this is a trivial point. Realistically, you are probably going to be covering a small section of the area described in this book on any given trip, and you will want a topo map of that area to complement this (or any) book. A larger scale map will correct any minor discrepancies such as trailhead parking having been moved a half mile, and your wilderness permit will tell you where you are now forbidden to camp or build a fire. Meanwhile, for basic functionality, Starr's Guide is unsurpassed. The routes are still essentially what they were 80 years ago, so age hardly matters.

To understand the concept of the book, look at the section titled Advice to Travelers, where Starr says "While it is possible to travel from one end of the Muir Trail to the other in a single trip, I consider it a far better plan to explore the region traversed by the trail in sections, taking a different one each trip... Each year one can look forward to enjoying a new part of the High Sierra." Exactly. If you're only going to hike once or twice in your life, e.g. marching with the masses to the summit of Mt. Whitney, you don't need Starr's Guide. But if you want to get to KNOW the Sierras, and think of hiking there as an ongoing expedition spanning many summers, then no other guide I know of will make it nearly as easy to identify the various regions you want to see, figure out which trailheads make the most sense as entry and exit points, and "fill in the blanks" as you explore.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pepper on October 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
I bought this book in the 60s before backpacking was the big thing it is now. But i still check it when i want to plan a trip from scratch. I've used it for way more than only JMT trips. I found wonderful wkend and longer loops off Florence Lake and Courtright Res and have seen things i never wd have seen basing my trips from other more "routine" books.

If you are serious about backpacking and want to do your own planning, get this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again