Starsuckers 2012 NR

Amazon Instant Video

(7) IMDb 7.3/10

A darkly humorous and shocking expose of celebrity-obsessed media, Starsuckers delves into our addiction to fame and blows the lid on the corporations and individuals who profit from it.

Starring:
Ellis Cashmore, Max Clifford
Runtime:
1 hour 45 minutes

Starsuckers

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Chris Atkins
Starring Ellis Cashmore, Max Clifford
Supporting actors Richard Curtis, Josef d'Bache-Kane, Nick Davies, Charlotte de Barker, Rupert Degas, Park Dietz, Emma Freud, Robert Galinsky, Bob Geldof, Jake Halpern, Elton John, Midge Ure, Harvey Weinstein
Studio Revolver Entertainment
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Johnny Cohen on September 27, 2012
Format: DVD
I'd like to think we're all shrewd enough to know that many tabloid headlines are nonsense but the degree to which news is exaggerated and manufactured is frightening. The celebrity obsessed culture that is ruining our media with a flood of banality and trivial non-news may seem nothing more than innocuous rubbish but the truth is far more sinister. Whilst never being dull or preachy this film is both hilarious and frightening at times. Very thought provoking and very entertaining. Not often you can say that about a film. Considering the multitude of major media corporations this film targets the director Chris Atkins (nominated for a BAFTA for the groundbreaking Taking Liberties) has got some real balls and immense integrity to release this at all. It was superb at the cinema but the DVD promises heaps of extra footage they couldn't cram into the movie in the form of DVD extras. So - go buy the film Max Clifford and Rupert Murdoch tried to stop with an injunction (what higher recommendation could there be?!)
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ken McCarthy on August 17, 2012
Format: DVD
You can't understand the modern world fully until you've seen this film. I've seen many of these data points before, but I've never seen them put all together in one place. Yes, electronic media - as controlled by a handful of epically corrupt and politically well connected corporations - is ruining society. It's not your imagination. It's a shame this film is not available in a format that people in the US, Canada and Japan can watch on DVD.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Zabriskie on October 14, 2012
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
First documentary about "the evil media" that I've been able to sit through and not want to throw out the window for being a chest-beating "woe is us" finger pointing type of show. They present some really interesting ideas about human psychology and why we're so enamoured with celebrity. They did a good job of calling out how media impacts youngsters while deftly avoiding the "what about the CHILDREN?!?!?!" whine that other progressive documentarians succumb to. Recommended!
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Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Lots of great bits in this film. However, the film constantly refers to the "we" that control the fame/illusion/media industries, as if they were one entity. Could have been better in this respect.
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