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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Filled with useful nuggets
Having been through a couple of startups already, I wish I'd had this book before. Amy and Brad share a tremendous number of practical and useful techniques that they have developed over the years. From simple ideas like having four minutes in the morning to the life meeting once a month, these are practical suggestions that can help any relationship and not just...
Published 11 months ago by C Lee

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good,
It gives a lot of general advice for keeping couples together while owning a business or extremely busy at work.
Published 13 months ago by Adam J. Briggs


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Filled with useful nuggets, August 27, 2013
This review is from: Startup Life: Surviving and Thriving in a Relationship with an Entrepreneur (Hardcover)
Having been through a couple of startups already, I wish I'd had this book before. Amy and Brad share a tremendous number of practical and useful techniques that they have developed over the years. From simple ideas like having four minutes in the morning to the life meeting once a month, these are practical suggestions that can help any relationship and not just startup relationships. My wife and I developed some similar techniques such as regular "business" meetings and time management buffer to compensate for lack of teleportation. The writing style is clear and easy to read which makes the book go by swiftly.

The book also has dozens of short vignettes from friends of Brad and Amy which provides some nice alternative points of view. After reading them you almost feel like you were dropped into the startup world of Boulder.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Telling the whole story of being an entrepeneur, August 25, 2013
This review is from: Startup Life: Surviving and Thriving in a Relationship with an Entrepreneur (Hardcover)
I like so many others am solidly in this book's target demographic. I've been lucky enough to be a serial entrepreneur, venture capitalist, and happily married for almost 20 years. Having said that, it hasn't all been easy. My wife and I were separated for almost a year as we difficultly learned many of the lessons in this book. If I could go back in time and hand this book to my younger self, it might have saved us much angst. I really appreciated the openness of all the contributors and will be recommending it within the founder community of my hardware accelerator.

It feels to me as if there are three life phases you can read this book in:

1 - As a younger entrepreneur with less relationship experience who absorbs some of this material but now has a permanent pointer for when they really need it in the future.
2 - As an entrepreneurial couple in the midst of relationship issues. So many of the things that were pointed out seem obvious now, but in apex of my marital challenges, this book would have been a godsend. Or a smack in the head!
3 - As more mature entrepreneurs who glean tips and reminders to stay on course, plus a desire to pass the book onto fellow entrepreneurs and couples in phases 1 and 2. I'm working hard, as an example, to incorporate shorter Qx vacations for my wife and I. In my limited experience with Qx, they really spur creativity and a remembrance of why life is awesome.

The one phrase from the book I can't get out of my head is "you can always make more money but you can't make more time"

It is ironic that I finished the book traveling on a business trip, but I couldn't wait to get home.

Brad and Amy did something brave in writing this book. They were open and honest. So many business books are smart but not honest or grounded. Most books tell only the part of the story that makes the book work, but not the whole story. This book tells much more of the honest story of being an entrepreneur, giving hands-on advice on how to protect the most important relationship in your life, the one with your partner.

Read this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great read!, July 31, 2013
This review is from: Startup Life: Surviving and Thriving in a Relationship with an Entrepreneur (Hardcover)
Super practical book filled with lots of advice with specific tactics tailored to common relationship hurdles. Each chapter addresses a separate topic so you can readily skip back and forth based on interest. After the intro it quickly became a page-turner as it touched on many situations I have personally experienced. I immediately recommended it to my co-founder who a few days later encouraged his spouse to read it too.

A much needed reference that spells out potential pitfalls and provides realistic approaches to deal with some of the most difficult issues in an entrepreneur's personal life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good,, July 6, 2013
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This review is from: Startup Life: Surviving and Thriving in a Relationship with an Entrepreneur (Hardcover)
It gives a lot of general advice for keeping couples together while owning a business or extremely busy at work.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Required Reading for Entrepreneurs!, January 20, 2013
By 
Bart Lorang (Boulder, Colorado, United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Startup Life: Surviving and Thriving in a Relationship with an Entrepreneur (Hardcover)
Length:: 1:27 Mins

I recently read Brad and Amy's book.

This is a no-nonsense, practical approach for Startup Entrepreneurs and their significant others. It should be required reading for all entrepreneurs - and for that matter, anyone who struggles with Work-Life Balance.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read Startup Life! (full review), May 2, 2013
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This review is from: Startup Life: Surviving and Thriving in a Relationship with an Entrepreneur (Hardcover)
Halfway through Startup Life, married couple Brad Feld and Amy Batchelor suggest that, "Being in a relationship with an entrepreneur is hard, possibly harder than being an entrepreneur" (p. 78). This hard-learned gem of wisdom is richly conveyed throughout their excellent read.

Through their own real-life examples, and those of others, Brad and Amy drive home the message that a founder's spouse or life partner is the true cofounder, the one without whose support and contributions the startup could be dead or might have never been born to begin with. Startup Life is an invaluable resource not only for showing life partners their likely path ahead, but also for opening the eyes of the founders themselves to the stresses their partners are likely to experience.

I appreciate how the book tackles the full range of the entrepreneurial journey, beginning with the initial decision to leap (e.g., when motivated by "not wanting to risk a life in a cubicle"), and culminating with a successful exit. However, their clear-eyed presentation of these events highlights the unexpected challenges that can accompany even the biggest success. For instance, the authors poignantly describe the aftermath of Brad's successful exit from one of his startups as "the entrepreneur's equivalent of post-partum depression." Far from the jubilation we would expect to see, Amy and Brad's raw reflection offers a sobering, honest view of the dark underbelly of what many expect to be the glorious Promised Land. Along the way, Brad and Amy impart a wide variety of practical lessons and suggestions, such as keeping a weekly digital "Shabbat" in which they are offline each Saturday.

To ensure they have cast a wide net of experience, Brad and Amy pepper the book with anecdotes and insights from others in the entrepreneurial ecosystem. Almost all of the outside write-ups have at least one important insight, but a couple of them are particularly golden. For instance, Keith Smith, founder-CEO of BigDoor in Seattle, provides very personal reflections on how habits he developed within the startup harm his personal life. Reflecting on that broader pattern, he says: "...the fact [is] that many of the skills that entrepreneurs develop to help us survive and ultimately succeed in a startup are in direct opposition to the skills we need to build a long, happy, and stable relationship. Embrace risk. Fail fast. Move even faster. Solve problems quickly, and without waiting for every fact to reveal itself. Multitask well. Shape the world around you to match your vision. ... [As a result] I've got screwed-up priorities, a well-developed set of exactly the wrong skills, and I come off as being emotionally unavailable."

Another golden write-up delves into the experiences of two spouses cofounding together - "couplepreneurs," if you will. (My data has shown that founding teams comprised of friends and/or family tend to be less stable than other teams, emphasizing how founding with those types of people is "playing with fire." Such teams should devote a lot of attention to developing "firewalls" to protect themselves.) Krista Marks and Brent Milne describe their own firewalls, such as always using each other's given names at work and nicknames at home, and going out of their way to prove to the rest of their teams that they do not discuss sensitive work issues at home.

More generally, succeeding at founding a startup while founding a family requires cultivating an awareness that startup rhythms are rarely in sync with the rhythms of personal life, and that there are often strong disconnects between the entrepreneur's psyche and the spouse's. Two of those disconnects are highlighted in the book by spouse Alexandra Antonioli: divergent perspectives on money ("A person who has always worked a salaried position from 9 to 5 arguably does not view money in the same way as the entrepreneur") and time ("entrepreneurs like to overbook. ... They will be late."). She calls the latter "the Entrepreneurial Time Zone."

In addition to highlighting the potential disconnects between the personal and the professional, Brad and Amy also highlight ways in which startup best practices should be imported into a founder's personal life. For instance, the entrepreneur's intense focus on the startup's cash position: "Make sure as a couple you know where you stand, how much money you actually have, what your monthly burn rate is, and how long you can go before you are out of money." Another bit of overlap with founding teams: "a couple that `never fights,' it's almost always a sign of avoiding talking about troubled topics and not the result of complete accordance and unity with each other."

Along the entrepreneurial journey, we get to know a variety of fun tidbits about Brad and Amy. For instance, Brad's ringtones include - perhaps a bit too tellingly! - "Money" for his VC partners and "Comfortably Numb" for CEOs. Brad's "14-year-old inner self" has a strong aversion to babies. Even though Brad stresses the importance of having regular Life Dinners with Amy, they've had to develop "our fail 12.5 percent of the time rule": that Amy allows Brad to miss it unexpectedly one out of eight times. And even though Brad had significant assets to protect when they got married, they don't have a formal prenup. Instead, if the relationship fails, Brad says that Amy gets everything and Brad will start over from scratch.

We're left with a richer picture of the authors, but also a richer picture of the ways in which the founding journey will challenge the most cherished of our relationships, insights that will hopefully enable us to preserve the professional without imperiling the personal.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected, but somewhat interesting, July 8, 2014
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Interesting. I bought it when my husband opened his third business and I was living through the inception. The downside is that it discusses living with an entrepreneur mostly if you don't already have kids or as if you are just deciding to marry/partner with an entrepreneur. I would've appreciated some insight into those relationships already established with entrepreneurs when the business didn't run their life and are now trying to cope with a new business that does.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Read for Any Entrepreneur Looking to Improve Their Relationship, June 26, 2014
It's very rare that an entrepreneur will give such insights into their personal life, and talk in such an honest and open way about their intimate relationships.

For this I'm very grateful to Brad and Amy for sharing their experience.

As a young entrepreneur, I learned a lot from this book, as it covers a lot of the challenges that will be faced in relationships to come, as well as give the tips and practices used to overcome them.

Also as a plus, like most of the Startup Life books, its short, to the point, and easy to read which most entrepreneurs will really appreciate as well. :)
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5.0 out of 5 stars great advice, June 24, 2014
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Well written, an easy read with a depth of knowledge. Amy and Brad's dynamic can be felt throughout. Love the side stories from other couples.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Proving that the cliche`, "It's lonely at the top", only holds true if you let it., May 15, 2014
Happily ever after takes a lot of hard work and communication, it doesn't just happen because two people fall in love. This book has so many helpful insights, tips, and stories that you can relate to, many of which are very humorous. I'm 30 years old and married to my high school sweetheart that I met when I was 17. I'm working on our startup company, Date Night, and it's a challenge being a wife, mom, and entrepreneur all at once. This book had so much information that my husband and I are implementing into our relationship and yielding positive results. You can't call this just a business book or just a relationship book, especially in my case, having a company who's mission is to improve relationships everywhere, and a marriage that I can't neglect. (Seriously, picture the headlines if I were to mess up my marriage. "CEO and founder of relationship company, Date Night, files for divorce." (So yeah, I'm definitely going to try and avoid that horrid fate of irony, ha, ha) I hate the old saying, It's not personal, it's just business, because my business will always be personal! I recommend this book for every entrepreneur who wants it all, true love and a successful startup! (Also, if you are an Audible fan like myself, this title is available and Brad is the narrator, that is where I bought it.)
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Startup Life: Surviving and Thriving in a Relationship with an Entrepreneur
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