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I'm Starved for You (Kindle Single) (Positron Book 1) Kindle Edition

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Length: 46 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Amazon.com Review

You'd be hard-pressed to find anyone more skilled at writing speculative fiction than Margaret Atwood, and she reigns supreme yet again with the provocative Kindle Single, I'm Starved for You. This dystopian fantasy takes you inside a social experiment called "Consilience," a preemptive strike against the chaos that will surely ensue if America's forty-percent unemployment rate remains unchecked. But how to come up with all those jobs? Simple: volunteer to go to prison. And don't fret if penitentiary orange is not your color. You will alternate between being a prisoner and being a prison employee, which means full-time employment for all, and ultimately "a future that will be more secure, more prosperous, and just all-round better because of [you]." That's right, you'll be a hero! But heroes are human too, and it's amazing how quickly controlled environments can get out of control when you add little things like lust to the mix. Atwood offers a saucy, sinister, and savvy social critique that, among other things, highlights the dangers of not listening to the voice in your head that says: This is "mealy-mouthed b.s."--Erin Kodicek

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Product Details

  • File Size: 197 KB
  • Print Length: 46 pages
  • Publisher: Byliner Inc. (March 7, 2012)
  • Publication Date: March 7, 2012
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007HD4YYG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #266,577 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

MARGARET ATWOOD, whose work has been published in over thirty-five countries, is the author of more than forty books of fiction, poetry, and critical essays. In addition to The Handmaid's Tale, her novels include Cat's Eye, shortlisted for the Booker Prize; Alias Grace, which won the Giller Prize in Canada and the Premio Mondello in Italy; The Blind Assassin, winner of the 2000 Booker Prize; and her most recent, Oryx and Crake, shortlisted for the 2003 Booker Prize. She lives in Toronto with writer Graeme Gibson.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By tessa O. on March 8, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This has all of the ingredients that made me fall in love with Margaret Atwood way back with The Handmaid's Tale. It's creepy, richly imaginative, and buzzing with erotic tension. The Orwellian future has never been so provocative. Cue the Barry White and surveillance cameras!
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By GrnDayMom on March 8, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Very interesting and makes you think. Could this be our future? It is easy to imagine how it could be. My only complaint was that I didn't want it to end. I was so involved with the story, I wasn't paying attention to my Kindle and how far into it I was...and the ending caught me off guard. I wanted more!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Shannon Esposito (Author of the Pet Psychic Mysteries) on March 8, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Once again, Margaret Atwood proves herself the mistress of dystopian fiction in this short novella. There is a particular scene that is handled in such a cool, offhanded way (by the character) that I had to stop reading and just think about the horror of it and wonder, "could this happen?" and then in shock, answer, "yes." This little tale is a must read to hold over Atwood fans between novels!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Alice on October 31, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the first of Margaret Atwood's Positron series, a Kindle Singles release available exclusively for Kindle users. I'd gone in with the assumption it was a stand-alone story, but I was happily mistaken. Happily, because I'd love to know what happens next, and I'm not ready to say goodbye to these characters yet.

The story is through the perspectives of Stan and Charmaine, a married couple who's chosen to go to prison for economic viability. A company has set up a program, called Consilience, where one lives and works in the prison for a month, then lives outside it for another month. One may well be working for slave wages and under constant surveillance, but there are three decent meals a day, a roof over one's head, and the trappings of surburbia for six months out of the year.

Despite their strict monitoring (or perhaps because of it), Charmaine begins an affair, conducted in the fuzzy times between her suburban life and her return to prison. Stan finds a note she dropped for her lover, and mistakenly assumes the man's wife left it. He fantasizes about a woman so passionate, while going through the motions with a wife he believes too innocent for such things.

The story is told in present tense, which works so well that I kept forgetting. It's not because of a sense of immediacy, though; the story takes place over the course of several months. Rather, it's the characters' living from one moment to the next, compartmentalizing, so that present tense seems the only way they'd process their lives.

The characters were excellent. Stan and Charmaine appear boring, even to one another, but they have a lot going on.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 11, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
But it left me feeling a bit flat in the end. This story would've been great as a thread in a longer novel, but there was just something missing. That said, I LOVED the world building - really fascinating and unique.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Andre du Chastel de Montrouge on March 9, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Soooo twisted and wicked! And such an appropriate launch: just before International Women's Day! I hope Harper reads it. Bravo Atwood!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Avowed Bibliophile on April 10, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar - but we have to remember the cigar is a vessel created from many leaves. That said, I think this story is layered as it should be and is neither just about dystopia, nor obsession, nor sex. Sex is after all the universal symbol for life force seeking creative expression. For me the narration is perfect as is, a tale about a thought provoking social experiment producing a context wherein rotation becomes not change but yet another predictable psychological jail whether it's your turn to be a guard or a prisoner, a place where personal freedom, articulation of individualism, and the seeking of productive satisfaction has to seek shadow corridors to find expression. [SPOILER ALERT]I thought the twisted ending where one protagonist gets his wish only to be further condemned by it (be careful what you ask for) is perfect as only sadistic evil can be, and who can forget the image of a woman about to give a handsome young man in his prime a lethal injection (he's "defective" as defined by the rulers), and as she puts the needle to his skin and sees the fear in his eyes, wonders if she should service him sexually "kind of like a last supper." Evocative imagery combines with the chill of a potential reality as produced by a true wordsmith. Expensive at $2.99? Frankly, isn't a good read priceless?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 12, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Atwood crafts another dystopia in the vein of "The Handmaid's Tale" and "The Year of the Flood," using society's ills as fodder for her spot-on apocalyptic satire. A future where unemployment rates drive Americans to willingly give up their freedom for half of their lives in order to guarantee stable work, a nice home, and "a meanigful life" every other month makes a surprisingly great backdrop for a story about forbidden passion and hilariously unrequited lust. The setting is masterfully done, the character building works across the board, the plot unfolds at a pace that keeps you hooked (though it does leave you wanting more), and the whole thing has a great sense of humor to it. A must for anyone who likes smart, timely fiction with an Orwellian tint.
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