and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$19.86
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $5.09 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
"Starving" to S... has been added to your Cart
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $4.37
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

"Starving" to Successful: The Fine Artist's Guide to Getting Into Galleries and Selling More Art Paperback – August 15, 2009


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$19.86
$15.86 $21.08
Best%20Books%20of%202014
$19.86 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

"Starving" to Successful: The Fine Artist's Guide to Getting Into Galleries and Selling More Art + How to Sell Art: A Systematic Approach to Creating Relationships with Collectors and Closing the Sale + Making It in the Art World: New Approaches to Galleries, Shows, and Raising Money
Price for all three: $55.73

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 204 pages
  • Publisher: RedDot Press (August 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615568327
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615568324
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #197,334 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Art flows through Xanadu Gallery owner J. Jason Horejs veins. Second generation in the art business, (Horejs father is a nationally recognized oil painter John Horejs) Horejs life has always been filled with art. Though not interested in pursuing a life as an artist, Horejs fell in love with the business side of art at an early age. At age 12, the future gallery owner was employed by his father building custom canvas stretchers. In 1991, at the age of 17, Horejs began working for Legacy Gallery in Scottsdale, AZ, where he learned the gallery business from the ground up. Horejs handled logistics, shipping and installation, eventually working into a sales position at the western art gallery. Horejs worked in the gallery s Scottsdale and Jackson Hole, WY, locations. In 2001, Jason and his wife, Carrie, opened Xanadu Gallery in Scottsdale. In spite of opening on September 11th into a completely changed art world, Horejs built the gallery into a successful venture, showing dozens of artists and selling to collectors from around the world, including major municipal and private collections. In 2008, Horejs developed a series of art marketing workshops designed to help artists better understand the gallery business and better prepare themselves to approach galleries. This series of workshops has helped hundreds of artists get organized to show and sell their work through galleries. "I discovered," says Horejs, "there was very little information out there for the aspiring professional artist regarding the business side of art, especially in terms of the crucial relationship between the artists and the fine art gallery. Even artists who have graduated with master s degrees leave school having never heard a word about how to approach galleries." Horejs observes that artists approaching his gallery are making many of the same mistakes, not because their work isn t gallery-ready, but simply because they don t have a clear idea of how to proceed. Horejs designed his workshops working closely with his parents and other artists who have learned the ropes of working with galleries by trial and error. The clear-headed advice the gallery owner gives is designed to give the artists concrete steps they can take to prepare their work, research galleries and approach galleries for representation.

More About the Author

Art flows through Xanadu Gallery owner J. Jason Horejs' veins. Second generation in the art business, (Horejs' father is a nationally recognized oil painter John Horejs) Horejs' life has always been filled with art. Though not interested in pursuing a life as an artist, Horejs fell in love with the business side of art at an early age. At age 12, the future gallery owner was employed by his father building custom canvas stretchers.

In 1991, at the age of 17, Horejs began working for Legacy Gallery in Scottsdale, AZ, where he learned the gallery business from the ground up. Horejs handled logistics, shipping and installation, eventually working into a sales position at the western art gallery. Horejs worked in the gallery's Scottsdale and Jackson Hole, WY, locations.

In 2001, Jason and his wife, Carrie, opened Xanadu Gallery in Scottsdale. In spite of opening on September 11th into a completely changed art world, Horejs built the gallery into a successful venture, showing dozens of artists and selling to collectors from around the world, including major municipal and private collections.

In 2008, Horejs developed a series of art marketing workshops designed to help artists better understand the gallery business and better prepare themselves to approach galleries. This series of workshops has helped hundreds of artists get organized to show and sell their work through galleries.

"I discovered," says Horejs, "there was very little information out there for the aspiring professional artist regarding the business side of art, especially in terms of the crucial relationship between the artists and the fine art gallery. Even artists who have graduated with master's degrees leave school having never heard a word about how to approach galleries."

Horejs observes that artists approaching his gallery are making many of the same mistakes, not because their work isn't gallery-ready, but simply because they don't have a clear idea of how to proceed. Horejs designed his workshops working closely with his parents and other artists who have learned the ropes of working with galleries by trial and error. The clear-headed advice the gallery owner gives is designed to give the artists concrete steps they can take to prepare their work, research galleries and approach galleries for representation.

His book on the subject was published in August of 2009.

In addition to his ongoing work with artists and collectors through Xanadu, Horejs has dedicated himself to disseminating his knowledge of the gallery business to artists.

Customer Reviews

This book was easy to read, entertaining, and full of helpful information.
Tom Swearingen
If you are getting ready to try to sell your artwork ... great book with a lot of good advice and author is a gallery owner and very helpful.
Sue S
I would recommend it to any artist who wants to learn the in's and out's of dealing with any art gallery and market their art.
Enola M.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 58 people found the following review helpful By John Chancellor TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
Having spent a life time working with small businesses in the New Orleans area, I have worked with a number of "starving" artist. I have also worked with a few very successful artists.

The major difference between the successful and the starving is not just the quality of their work. It is the basic approach to their work. The commercially successful treat art as a business. One of the principles of any successful business is constant improvement of their product.

"Starving" to Successful is a guide to treating art as a business. The book is written by Jason Horejs, a gallery owner in the Phoenix area. The book gives a lot of good basic advice about becoming a commercially successful artist. Even thought Jason does not specifically say it, it is implied throughout the book that if you want to be successful, you must treat your art as a business. People are not going to find you, beat down your door and buy your art.

There are two separate but crucial parts to being commercially successful. You must produce good, high quality art. You will not be able to make a good living if all you produce is poor quality art or work that is difficult to distinguish from any other artist. But even with a high quality product, you still need to market your art.

The marketing is where most artists miss the boat. They often feel that they do not need to engage in marketing or selling. Nothing sells without some very determined marketing effort.

This is not a complex book. It is written in very conversational style, easy to understand. It is written as a starter or basic guide to marketing your art. Jason is a gallery owner and therefore it is written from the perspective of a gallery owner.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Karen Tiede VINE VOICE on June 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
I bought this book after attending a live seminar delivered by Jason. Loved the class; wall-to-wall information, well-organized, well managed, excellent value overall. And the book is good, too, as far as I can tell.

The single most useful bit of information I got out of both, and I learned this indirectly, is that until your work is selling at something in the vicinity of $1/sq in (and if you're going to argue about square-inch pricing, find another combatant), your work won't be attractive to a gallery owner in a major market. There's simply not enough money in the gallery's cut to make it worth their time to carry you. (The number of galleries I have seen close in minor markets who did not follow this rule of thumb is a form of proof, too.)

(Sculptors have a similar equation but as I'm not one right now, I didn't think theirs through.)

The rest of the book is useful and true art marketing stuff.

I can't speak to whether I could get a viewing by walking in with a portfolio. Given what I know today, I'm not going to try. Jason saved me a whole lotta misplaced planning and thinking by getting clear about the economics of gallery representation. There's a big wide world of art sales outside the gallery network, and I'm better off attending to that market than chasing galleries who can't afford to show my work.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Josephine Geiger on July 1, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While it is a very quick read, and follows almost verbatum the webinar/seminar content Jason did during the 2010smARTist teleconference, it really helps to "see" the print. I found the short section on selling your artwork to be very helpful. Yes, the concept is the same as I've read elsewhere, but the presentation manner was completely unique. I read the sales section the night before the last day of an art show that was not going well, and sold 2 pieces that day implementing the sales techniques Jason described. For me, it was eye-opening to hear about the sales experience from the perspective of a buyer - it's all bout what they want not what you want.
I will be re-reading the sales concepts before every upcoming show. Just for those few pages, this book was totally worth it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 25 people found the following review helpful By D. O'Dell on January 30, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very good book and should be read by anyone who aspires to sell their art through galleries. What makes this book superior to other 'art marketing' books is it is written from the perspective of the gallery. I'm a working professional artist (30+ years) and I've read all kinds of marketing books. Most of the information in 'general' marketing books does not apply because of the uniqueness of the art business. Furthermore, 'art marketing' books written by artists generally deal with what worked for them. "Starving to Successful" finally provides some insight and advice on what it's like from the gallery's perspective. If you wish to sell your art through galleries it's very important to know how the galleries think and what influences their decision-making process --this book provides that information. Contrary to the negative review posted, I have walked into galleries cold, gotten my portfolio reviewed, and got a show. What I appreciate most about this book is the author's honesty. The art world is brimming with B.S. but you won't find any in "Starving to Successful." Highly recommended!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By inkboyjr on June 7, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have a BFA from a University. They NEVER discussed what is required to market and sell my art. I've taken private art lessons from several established artists, they NEVER discussed what is required to market and sell my art. The further I take my art career the more I have discovered that I need to spend more time considering how to market my work. This book is very well thought out and has given me a new perspective on the gallery side of selling my work. Thanks, Jason for the helpful book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews