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Stateside: Poems Paperback – March 29, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 72 pages
  • Publisher: Triquarterly (March 29, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810152142
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810152144
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,350,870 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

In Jehanne Dubrow's Stateside, the formalities of structure--rhyme and meter--play against the formalities imposed upon the life of a military wife. There are poems in marching meters and poems that provide counterpoint to those rhythms, but, most of all, hers is a fully experienced suite, fully composed in every sense of that word, both intimate and public, an accomplished book.  She is a contemporary Penelope whose tale is epic. --Sam Hamill
  

About the Author

Jehanne Dubrow is the author of three poetry collections, most recently Stateside (TriQuarterly, 2010). Her work has appeared in The New Republic, Poetry, Ploughshares, The New England Review, and Prairie Schooner. She is an assistant professor of creative writing and literature at Washington College, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

More About the Author

Jehanne Dubrow is the author of four poetry collections, including most recently Red Army Red and Stateside (Northwestern University Press, 2012 and 2010). Her first book, The Hardship Post (2009), won the Three Candles Press Open Book Award, and her second collection From the Fever-World, won the Washington Writers' Publishing House Poetry Competition (2009). Finishing Line Press published her chapbook, The Promised Bride, in 2007.

Her poetry, creative nonfiction, and book reviews have appeared in journals such as The Southern Review, The New Republic, Poetry, Ploughshares, The Hudson Review, The New England Review, Gulf Coast, Copper Nickel, Crazyhorse, Prairie Schooner, and on Poetry Daily and Verse Daily.

She is the Director of the Rose O'Neill Literary House and an assistant professor of creative writing at Washington College, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Customer Reviews

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That makes her tough as nails in my book.
Tethys
They are handled with such deftness and grace that the reader is barely aware of their presence.
reader
I read this book from the perspective of a military spouse who has experienced deployment.
J. S.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Susan McLean on June 17, 2010
Format: Paperback
Many excellent poetry books deal with war from the point of view of the participants, but rarely does one find an examination of the life of the military spouse left behind during deployment. Stateside by Jehanne Dubrow is a gripping, thoughtful, and unsparing portrait of the author's responses to separation, anxiety, stress, longing, and the often prickly friction of reunion.

The book has three sections, which are roughly divided into before, during, and after the deployment. In the first section, Dubrow catalogues the fears, dreams, and preparations before her husband's departure. In the nightmarish sonnet "Against War Movies" she runs through all the war movies she has seen, imagining that she sees her husband in every character who is killed: "Each movie is a training exercise, / a scenario for how my husband dies." In the second section, Dubrow uses The Odyssey as a lens for viewing her life while her husband is gone, but this Penelope diets, gets a new haircut, fends off passes from divorcés, walks the dog Argos, takes Telemachus to the mall. Both of the first two sections are highly effective, but my favorite is the third section, which faces up unblinkingly to the difficulties of re-entry after a long absence, each spouse newly awkward around the other.

The feelings are both raw and nuanced in these poems, and Dubrow's technical mastery of the wide variety of forms--blank verse, rhymed quatrains, triplets, couplets, sonnets, nonce forms--acts as a sort of protective gear for handling potentially explosive emotions. Her approach to form is flexible, often using loose rhythms and slant rhymes. Thought and feeling do not cancel each other out in the poems, but pull against each other with a tension that also creates a bridge
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. S. on January 18, 2011
Format: Paperback
I read this book from the perspective of a military spouse who has experienced deployment. I could not put the book down -- I had to stay up to read it all in one sitting. The poems resonated deeply with me. Dubrow expresses beautifully and accurately the churn of emotions that a spouse experiences, from the time that one receives the news of the impending separation and the preparation that goes along with it, to the realities of life during the deployment and the anxiety that goes along with it, to the re-adjustment of a husband and wife learning to live together again. The poems skillfully reflect how deployment changes our perspective on daily routines and the coping mechanisms that we develop to get through it. Dubrow also ties her emotions to the experiences of so many women throughout history. Her poems serve as a reminder that war, and the families that are left behind, is a phenomenon that been going on for hundreds of years. Although the world, and wars themselves, have changed significantly, the emotional struggles of the family members who remain "stateside" have not changed all that much.

I very much enjoyed this book, and I highly recommend it. It will be on my recommendation list for any family that is preparing for deployment, has experienced deployment, or anyone who wants to understand what it is like for those of us who love and support those who serve on the frontlines in our military.
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Format: Paperback
Jehanne Dubrow held a contest/giveaway on her blog recently and I won a copy of her book of poetry entitled Stateside. Sadly the package did not arrive with a giant sized box of Kleenex which I highly recommend you purchase before sitting down with this book.
I admit that I have always had an intense respect for Jehanne. She is a faculty member at Washington College, which I find very inspirational, since I still think I want to go tenure-track. So far, she's the only milspouse I've met that has managed to swing my dream job. That makes her tough as nails in my book.
I haven't read every word yet. I think it is too weighty for me to digest in one sitting. I found that each selection I read as I flipped through the book brought me back to some moment of my marriage. Reading felt so personal, like she was at once essentially "strumming my pain with [her] fingers" and at the same time I was voyeuristically watching her lay bare the very essence of herself in a way that I do not have the courage to do.
I found her comparisons to Penelope from the Odyssey incredibly clever, providing a familiar place for people who don't live this life an easy entry point into our world. And, as someone who has read the Iliad and the Odyssey in Latin for my Latin classes in high school, I found it refreshing to see these stories humanized and put into the perspective of the modern world.
I strongly suggest you buy the book and read it for yourself. It is a very portable version of every military spouse's story and a window into a world that most Americans find completely alien.
I feel incredibly lucky to have had the opportunity to win such a wonderful book. I want to thank Jehanne for hosting the contest and providing me the opportunity to see myself reflected in another's eyes.
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By laura madeline wiseman on April 13, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Author of two previous books, From the Fever-World, (Washington Writers' Publishing House) and The Hardship Post (Three Candles Press) and a chapbook of poetry, The Promised Bride (Finishing Line Press), Jehanne Dubrow's third book Stateside focuses on the emotional tides of the milspouse experience. Here we find Penelope stateside while the marriage bed waits with "branches splayed/ like fingers," "glum /suitors" via for her affection, Telemachus tantrums at the mall "his voice an ambulance/ at siren pitch", and the family pooch lifts his head "to sight each ship".

But Penelope is not the antiquated Penelope of The Odyssey alone, but a contemporary metaphor for and lyrical chronicle of military life for wives who remain while their loves are deployed elsewhere and when together again, how the couple traverses those distances created by time apart, by promise of future separation, and by fear of death, as Dubrow writes, "We're arguing about his death again." But these are navigatable waters, for Dubrow offers readers poems such as "A Short Study of Catastrophe," "Instructions for Other Penelopes," and "On the Erotics of Deployment."

In Stateside, one is "hardly a ship lost in the storm."
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