Station To Station

July 18, 2000 | Format: MP3

$6.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
10:14
30
2
4:00
30
3
6:03
30
4
5:34
30
5
6:15
30
6
6:00

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 20, 1999
  • Release Date: September 20, 1999
  • Label: Parlophone UK
  • Copyright: 1999 Jones/Tintoretto Entertainment Company LLC This Label Copy information is the subject of Copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 1999 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 38:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000TDDIC0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (184 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,975 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

This is one of the best albums I've ever heard.
E. Bukowski
The live versions are slightly longer, but sound very much like the studio versions.
John B. Maggiore
Musically, it's a great song with a fine arrangement.
adapt1

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 58 people found the following review helpful By J. Robertson on September 28, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
For fans, this release has been a long time coming. A truncated version of the live Nassau Coliseum show has been available as a bootleg for some 30-odd years. Two of the tracks received an official release in 1992 as part of Rykodisc's Bowie reissue campaign, but finally we have it in its full blown state-of-the-art 2010 remastered glory (and sounding pretty damned good for a 34 year-old recording)!
The packaging is outstanding and the liner notes are generous.
One minor peeve: I had read that there would be a download link to obtain the full 13:08 minute version of Panic in Detroit with the extended drum solo, but so far, I have not been able to locate that. In reality, I can probably live without it...
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69 of 72 people found the following review helpful By 00 Diablo on September 30, 2010
Format: Audio CD
I am not commenting on the excellent music this set contains or the iconic artist who created it. There's no doubt in my mind that Station to Station is one of the most important and enjoyable albums from one of the top rock artists of all time, and fully deserves to be treasured as part of our cultural history and presented in the highest quality possible. So a super deluxe set like this is a compelling, and in my case, a necessary purchase.

And there is a lot about this set that was done right, from the inclusion of the highly regarded, original RCA CD mastering from the mid-80s, to an audiophile quality, 2 channel hi-resolution version of the album included on the DVD. Not to mention the vinyl and other goodies that make this set hard to resist for any fan.

But that makes it all the more maddening that EMI would deliberately sabotage the highly anticipated live concert CD included, as well as the (hard to get these days) 5.1 audio mix on the DVD with horrendous, over-compressed, brick-walled mastering that robs the music of it's natural dynamics and life. The continued insistence of the record companies to compress the life out of the music makes absolutely no sense on a super deluxe edition like this, and is driving away whatever discerning music purchasing buyers they have left.

We all need to complain to EMI for intentionally ruining the sound on the 5.1 mix, as well as the live tracks, if they are listening. At least they got the original 2 channel album right, so I'm still recommending this set despite some flaws.
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95 of 105 people found the following review helpful By B. G. Shultz on February 2, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The mid-1970's were a stressful time for David Bowie. His marriage to the obnoxious Angela Bowie was disintegrating, he had become a top-notch coke freak, and was convinced that practitioners of black magic were out to get him. He had laid his Ziggy Stardust persona to rest, in favor of a white-boy soul man character, which was not as well-received as he had hoped. While his "Young Americans" album was a bold step in a new direction, it did not receive the kind of adoration that Bowie had become accustomed to. Somehow, while fighting with dictatorial manager Tony Defries, sorcerers, and the homosexual image he had created for himself, David managed to come up with an absolutely brilliant album that retains the disco-funk of "Americans", but pushes it into a whole new direction. The persona that dominates this album is that of the Thin White Duke, an aristocratic European fellow who likes to cruise around in limos, binged out on cocaine, his head swimming in fascist paranoid fantasies (someone once told me that "Station To Station"-era Bowie was one of the people Pink Floyd based "The Wall" on. I cannot verify this but it seems plausible). So self-absorbed was David during this era that he actually made his band play behind a backdrop during concerts, so that he could be the one and only center of the audience's attention. One look at the photos inside the CD booklet (David, looking like a famished hairdresser in sore need of a dental hygienist, scribbling kabbalistic desings on an asylum floor) will clue the listener in to Bowie's frame of mind at the time. The songs themselves are the antithesis of the shallow yet groovy preceding album; the hooks are there, but not as contrived sounding.Read more ›
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40 of 42 people found the following review helpful By anaveragejoe on September 29, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I am NOT a fan of re-issues. I have bought very few re-issues, and don't have lots of cash for boxed sets. BUT... this is different. Aside from the fact that this album was perhaps the most significant "transformation" in a forty-year career of transformation, This package is truly, truly OUTSTANDING. First, from a sonic perspective, I just listened to the Harry Maslin (original producer / engineer) re-mastered 5.1 DVD audio: Holy crap, I am hearing sounds I've never heard before, and they are terrific! The clarity is amazing... it really sounds like you are in the studio, hearing the band right in front - and all around - you. (I listened to it on a $199.00 Sony Surround Sound system purchased about eight years ago, with one sub-woofer, one front center speaker and four directional / satellite speakers. Nothing fancy.) There are also a couple of remastered CD's - the original analogue remastered, plus the original CD remastered. But the big "prize" is the 1976 Nassau Colliseum gig. I was at the Garden gig the night before (or the night after?), and it was one of the most intense concerts I have ever seen and heard. The band was as tight as can be, Bowie was in top form, and the crowd was truly blown away! (And for good reason - the band and Bowie put on a rock concert which brought the crowd into another dimension for the entire night. Truly pulsating, and mesmerizing.) With the deluxe boxed set, you get the concert as an album, and on CD's. But here is the "bonus" - lots of little goodies, in the form of photo booklets, press packages, fan club replica material, a poster, and a couple of cute little photo pins. In the replica press kit, there is a replica four page bio. I was shocked at how impressively this was done.Read more ›
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