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Station To Station : The Secret History of Rock & Roll on Television Paperback – November 1, 2000


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Station To Station : The Secret History of Rock & Roll on Television + TV-a-Go-Go: Rock on TV from American Bandstand to American Idol
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Gallery Books (November 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671034448
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671034443
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.8 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,727,119 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Marc Weingarten is a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, US Weekly, Rolling Stone, Spin, Entertainment Weekly, and Vibe. He lives in Los Angeles.

More About the Author

I'm a journalist and author in Los Angeles. I'm from New York originally, but L.A. has been my home for so long no w that I've forgotten what New York looks like. I write freelance articles on books, TV, technology, music and whatever else strikes my fancy at the moment I'm pitching. I've got a beautiful family that doesn't seem to care that I'm not as good-looking as they are.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By L Buckley on December 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
For a Gen-X (or younger) pop-culture fan, there is much that will be new and worth a perusal here. For instance: there is a good chapter on the mid-sixties equivalents of MTV, which were shows like Shindig, Hullabaloo, and Where the Action Is, and a chapter, also good, on the machinations behind the Beatles appearances on Ed Sullivan.
Weingarten is at times very good writer (or has a very good editor, although see my comments below about editorial fact checking)--take this passage, for example: "In 1969 singer Tom Jones was every mother's secret sex fantasy, a darkly handsome Welsh testosterone bomb who had a knack for squeezing every last ounce of raw emotion from a lyric until it grew knuckle hair" (I'll forgive the mixed metaphor of squeezing ounces out lyrics like juice from oranges and then having the lyrics grow knuckle hair).
On the down-side, a good bit of this book seems to be broad summaries of trends reported in other, more detailed treatements of the chapters' topics. At times, Weingarten's writing sounds like VH-1-styled pablum history, and at times its just lazy with the facts--for example: "The harmonic convergence between pop music and animation lasted until the mid-1970s, when bubblegum pop fizzled out and kids turned their attention to Pac-Man, Space Invaders, and Asteroids" (Pac-Man? In the mid-1970s?), or "Weird Al Yankovic, an accordianist from Lynwood, California, who father was a polka star" (10 seconds on AllMusic.com would have revealed that Yankovic "was born October 23, 1959 in Lynwood, California. An only child, he began playing the accordion at age seven, following in the tradition of polka star Frank Yankovic (no relation)...
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Format: Paperback
The story of Rock and Roll is the story of Television, and the author knows it. He shows every major development in rock and roll through how it appeared on Television. It starts off in the most logical place, Elvis on Ed Sullivan, and ends with MTV. Any major development is in here. My personal favorite was the chapter titled, "Couch time with the Counterculture". This chapter had, Mamas and the Papas on Ed Sullivan, John Lennon and Yoko Ono on Mike Douglas, as well as The Smother's Brothers. It also covers the variety shows, Ricky Nelson, the Monkees, Schoolhouse Rock and the Partridge Family. I recomend this book to any fan of rock music, regardless of what decade interests you
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Format: Paperback
Marc Weingarten's 2000 publication on the history of Rock and Roll on television covers history from the first flickers of local sock-hop programs in the early 1950s to the then-nascent development of online music videos. The book is merely an overview containing the highlights of the development of the medium. Topics covered include the first appearance of Elvis Presley on TV (on Jackie Gleason's "Stage Door" show and not on the Ed Sullivan Show as some assumed), the history of American Bandstand, the famous appearance of the Beatles on the Sullivan Show in February 1964, brief mentions of prime-time shows Shindig!! and Hullabaloo, the creation of "cartoon rock" shows, Soul Train and the rise of MTV.

The presentation of the material was adequate with some factual mistakes (THE John Birch was dead for over 20 years by the time Bob Dylan proposed to sing his ballad "Talkin' John Birch Society Paranoid Blues" on Ed Sullivan and not living as the book claimed; also Weird Al Yankovic's father was NOT a polka star; an unrelated Frankie Yankovic was), yet it did present a structured framework on the development of rock's influence on the nation as it became more acceptable to society as a whole. The book contains some end notes and an index. A good, quick read for someone interested in acquiring some music history knowledge. Four stars.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lee Notowich on March 23, 2001
Format: Paperback
Station to Station was incredible. Reading this book was like being back stage at a concert. The insight that Marc Weingarten has about the music industry is remarkable. This is a must read for everyone who is interested in the past, present, and future of Rock-n-Roll.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful By DaveVideo on November 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
I haven't cracked the cover yet, but he played in my band in the late-Seventies and he knows absolutely everything about music. I learned it all from him. He's brilliant. (His father paid me to write this stuff).
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