Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Statistical measures of accuracy for riflemen and missile engineers Unknown Binding – 1991


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$20.00
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Unknown Binding: 52 pages
  • Publisher: F.E. Grubbs; 2nd edition (1991)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0006RA7ZA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,278,752 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth L. Walters on March 12, 2005
Frank Grubbs was an excellent statistician and his treatment of this subject was unique. For a serious target shooter, this is probably THE MOST IMPORTANT BOOK you could own.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Unknown Binding Verified Purchase
This is a useful product but is rather abstruse unless you have a degree in statistics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By wyokyo on July 8, 2009
This is a useful starting point for serious shooters with an interest in statistics. Despite limited availability, it is one of the most cited works in this micro-field. However, for the well-armed statistician, it leaves a few things to be desired. The work is entirely rooted in the frequentist approach. Alas, Grubbs erred when he used independent Gaussian assumptions.

Reading any second year statistics textbook will reveal that arrival times and locations (e.g. bullet impacts) are realizations of a discretely deterministic process. Modern statistics dictates Poisson process is to be preferred. My experience tells me that the best distributional assumption is going to be a log-Gaussian Cox process of some sort. Not only do these start in the right place (i.e. stochastic events), but they can be tweaked to describe events seen in the data: +Defects in rifling producing patterned errors can be addressed with a stationary cluster process. +Drift in bullet mean location due to change in barrel temperature can be addressed by adding some attractive Markov-type process to the generating function. +Changes in accuracy due to barrel temperature can be addressed by adding a time-varying parameter. +The interaction of drift in mean point of impact and increased accuracy from a warm barrel can be handled by adding a Hawkes process.

This was an important booklet. And it is still useful for hobbyists with some background in statistics. But if you're actually good at statistics, it's just ... annoying. If you want to perform serious statistical analysis on bullet arrival patterns, you'd do far better to start with any of the standard textbooks on spatial statistics (esp. Moller & Waagepetersen "Statistical Inference and Simulation for Spatial Point Processes").
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again