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To Steal a Book Is an Elegant Offense: Intellectual Property Law in Chinese Civilization (Studies in East Asian Law, Harvard University) Paperback – January 1, 1997


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To Steal a Book Is an Elegant Offense: Intellectual Property Law in Chinese Civilization (Studies in East Asian Law, Harvard University) + Piracy and the State: The Politics of Intellectual Property Rights in China
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Product Details

  • Series: Studies in East Asian Law, Harvard University
  • Paperback: 236 pages
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press (January 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0804729603
  • ISBN-13: 978-0804729604
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #522,507 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This ambitious, pioneering work makes available a wealth of new material. It is presented in a richly textured context of the forces—historical, cultural, and political—that have shaped China's approach to the drafting and enforcement of legislation relating to copyrights, patents, and trademarks. Scholars of Chinese law and comparative law and specialists in the law of intellectual property will welcome its publication."—R. Randle Edwards, Columbia University School of Law


"Alford offers a rich mine of materials for those studying intellectual property rights in China. Reviewing Chinese civilization from imperial days to the present, he seeks to answer why intellectual property law has never taken hold in China."—Choice


"A wealth of information and analysis on Chinese views of intellectual property rights. . . . The strength of Alford's book is its ability to step back from the heated debates surrounding China's actions and look at the subject in its entirety. The reader is thus able to gain a deeper understanding of the issue and the obstacles that both China and the United States must overcome if a longlasting and mutually beneficial solution is to be found."—The China Business Review


"In this timely and important study, . . . Alford's point is that intellectual property issues are inextricable from broad historical, political, economic, and cultural contexts. . . . Of much broader interest than may be at first apparent."—Business History Review

From the Back Cover

“This ambitious, pioneering work makes available a wealth of new material. It is presented in a richly textured context of the forces—historical, cultural, and political—that have shaped China’s approach to the drafting and enforcement of legislation relating to copyrights, patents, and trademarks. Scholars of Chinese law and comparative law and specialists in the law of intellectual property will welcome its publication.”—R. Randle Edwards, Columbia University School of Law
“Alford offers a rich mine of materials for those studying intellectual property rights in China. Reviewing Chinese civilization from imperial days to the present, he seeks to answer why intellectual property law has never taken hold in China.”—Choice

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By raiderdave on March 8, 2002
Format: Paperback
With China joining the WTO at the end of last year it has become more important for Westerners to understand this aspect of Chinese society. Under the WTO, China is obligated by the rules of the TRIPs Agreement (Trade Related aspects of Intellectual Property)amongst other traditional trade rules.
To join the world trading community, China has obligated itself to enforce intellectual property rights (Copyright, Trademark, and Patent protection)
This book traces the long Chinese history of these rights and gives an important insight into the cultural differences that exist and are ingrained in Chinese society compared to an almost reflexive understanding of these rights in the West.
An important contribution for readers with an apprecition for historical sweep analysis of an issue.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jiaojiao Ye on May 24, 2013
Format: Paperback
there is also another business ethics ingrained in Chinese culture, Confucianism, " love the property, seek it properly".

when it comes for education purpose, it is arguable "decent offense" or not, education is best resort of poverty reduction and social upward mobility, even for the purpose of legal infrastructure among developed countries and emerging marketplaces.

If it is for the purpose of monetizing, think about the image of money, or the copper coins, outside square and inside round, it also represents the idea that being a gentleman, outside mellow, and inside disciplined.

This idea is also deeply ingrained in Chinese culture.
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