Stealing Buddha's Dinner and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$11.27
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $3.73 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Stealing Buddha's Dinner:... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Stealing Buddha's Dinner: A Memoir Paperback – January 29, 2008


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.27
$4.71 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$11.99

Frequently Bought Together

Stealing Buddha's Dinner: A Memoir + Lame Deer, Seeker of Visions (Enriched Classics)
Price for both: $16.66

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (January 29, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143113038
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143113034
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 5.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #53,688 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Relevant not only to anyone who's ever lusted after the perfect snack . . . but anyone who's ever felt like an outsider."
-San Francisco Chronicle

"A charming memoir . . . Her prose is engaging, precise, compact."
-The New York Times Book Review

"Her typical and not-so-typical childhood experiences give her story a universal flavor."
-USA Today

About the Author

Bich Minh Nguyen teaches literature and creative writing at Purdue University. She lives with her husband, the novelist Porter Shreve, in West Lafayette, Indiana and Chicago.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Sometimes a memoir can be written too soon.
Sheri Dillinger
It was nice to read this parts, and felt the section closed the book well, but the gap made the the ending feel awkward and incomplete.
Shullieq
It was an easy read and I would recommend it.
Anne

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By ED on August 11, 2009
Format: Paperback
Very fun memoir of growing up Vietnamese with a Hispanic step-mom in Grand Rapids Michigan. Very readable and insightful book about American culture as seen through a young immigrant's eyes. I wish the author had been willing to "dig deeper" because after I finished the book there were many unanswered questions for me particularly with regard to the author's biological mother and with regard to her relationship with her father. Sometimes it seemed that the author used humor to avoid dealing with the larger issues. Also, the obsession with food becomes a bit silly and redundant.-- I read this for my book club, and it was not something that I would have picked out, but I enjoyed it... very humorous and the author writes beautifully; my 14 year old daughter wants to read it now. --Great book for middle schoolers and young teens.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Kirvi Dances on May 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
While Ms. Nguyen does an amazing job of crafting a portrait of her childhood experiences, the food symbolism gets a bit heavy-handed by the middle of the book. In fact, by the final chapter, I felt like I had been bludgeoned with it.

While the reader is drawn in to her experience, we are never quite able to sympathize with her.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Sheri Dillinger on July 26, 2009
Format: Paperback
Nguyen's description of the Grand Rapids culture and it's effects on outsiders hit the mark dead center. Her memory of the many food commodities of the time is precisely accurate. The unspoken observation of the limited perspective and smallness of aspiration of that time rings true. The feeling of suffocation while living this place briefly as an adolescent and then as an adult, decades later, returned with the reading of her memoir. But she left me wanting. Her purpose for writing the story eluded me. The themes, a precise retrospective and the angst of the outsider, are lacking a depth of reflection and a commentary of their impact on the author. I would love for Nguyen to revisit her experiences at some point in the future and give us a more substantive review, beyond observation and statement. I would like to know if that feeling of being an outsider follows her beyond this city and through time. I want to hear if, twenty years from now, she still craves Pringles. Sometimes a memoir can be written too soon. I believe that is the case with this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Yuki Yamamoto on June 13, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm not quite finished reading this book yet, but it's been quite a joy discovering historic perspectives in an area I have never been to in this country. Although each Asian culture has different practices with our food, offering a gift, such as a fresh fruit, to the alter and later on receive it back for us to eat is much the same in mine, Japanese. I remember my grandma giving a steaming bowl of rice and a fruit every morning, first thing to do for the day. A nice summer read, even if you may not be familiar with all the culturally iconic junk foods of America.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sasikanth Kethu on April 20, 2011
Format: Paperback
I brought the Stealing Buddha's Dinner from public library last week for my daughter to read. But I ended up reading for myself before she attempted to read. I liked the author's cultural confusion experience. This is because being an Indian(Hindu) immigrant I myself get confused about the culture in America once in a while. Thankfully I or my family did not face the hardships the author and her family did face while adusting to American life. I like and respect Mrs. Rosa, Mrs. Bich stepmom, the best. The ending is really touching and good. Has nice title to attract the readers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By McGuffy Ann Morris on March 2, 2011
Format: Paperback
Stealing Buddha's Dinner

Bich Minh Nyugen

This is the memoir of a young Vietnamese girl growing up in 1980's Michigan. Bich Nyugen tells her emotional story--- of being a Vietnamese immigrant after the fall of Saigon, 1975.

Not long after settling in Michigan, Bich's father marries a Hispanic woman. It is interesting to see yet another culture blend into Bich's young life. Throughout the book we gradually learn about Bich's mother and the mystery surrounding her absence.

Bich artfully exposes moments and facts through food, tradition, culture, and the youthful desire to "fit in", to "belong". Her story is both universal and intimate.

A very unique memoir, sweet and poignant, its flavor will linger.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Anne on August 14, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What I most enjoyed about this book was gaining some insite to becoming a new American and how difficult even the most every day things can become. I also appreciated the last half of the book when the author was an adult and that persective. I think we can all relate in that we are familiar with our own culture and when we find ourselves on the outside it feels very different. Imagining what it must be like to leave your home land and culture is very thought provoking. This book is the authors memories and not a story per say, because of that I really enjoyed it. It was an easy read and I would recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amy on June 24, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Although I am a Chinese immigrant, I too grew up in Michigan and have been to Grand Rapids many times. I can absolutely identify with the author about....everything (except for the mixed family part). The food references is something only us first generation immigrant children who long to be Americanized can fully comprehend. The author's statements about being so wrapped up in everyday American foods and the struggle to get them and immersing yourself in the fascination of your fellow classmates lives made me realize that I wasn't the only "weird" asian little girl who longed for all these seemingly ordinary things. I also identified with her escape to her books (the ramona quinbys and the little women. I really felt like this could've been my memoir. This book is really something every first generation immigrant child should read, if only to know you're not alone in feeling this way.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?