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Stealing First Perfect Paperback – April 23, 2012


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Product Details

  • Perfect Paperback: 228 pages
  • Publisher: Legacy Book Publishing (April 23, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1937952142
  • ISBN-13: 978-1937952143
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,857,144 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Stealing First is an example of truly stellar writing..." Steve Jensen, author, The Poison of a Smile

One race barrier shattered doesn't shatter it for everyone. "Stealing First"... is a must for historical fiction collections focusing on sports and race.  ~ Midwest Book Reviews

Fiction based on fact, Stealing First (Legacy Publishing) by Drew Golden tells the tale of a racially-segregated small town in Louisiana during the 1950's. While it is a story set in poverty, corruption and bias, its powerful messages of honor and camaraderie are awe-inspiring... ~ Style Magazine

From the Inside Flap

The Nina Redbirds battle Breaux Bridge's Bayou Braves for the regional American Legion Baseball Championship and Ronnie LeBlanc, the Redbirds' talented pitcher, believes that winning the regional title is his ticket out of a dead-end job at the local sugar mill.

Saddled by race bias, shabby equipment, and Ronnie's win-at-all-cost attitude, the Redbirds suffer a series of losses - and Ronnie sees his chance at the big leagues evaporating. When the team's coach quits, the only one willing to take the job is a former Negro League pitcher who faces being the only African-American in a still-segregated game.

Beaten twice in the week prior to the championship by the ham-fisted Bayou Braves, Ronnie begins to suspect external forces are the cause of his team's unlucky streak. As he digs for answers, he stumbles upon a secret: Bo Brasseux, the town's bigoted banker, is scheming to kill the Redbirds' new coach, throw the championship game, and ruin Ronnie's family financially.

A scout for the Chicago Cubs, impressed by Ronnie's talent, could be the answer, but will being tapped by the Cubs be enough to thwart Brasseux's despicable plans against the coach and Ronnie's family?

Ronnie's dream has two strikes against it; his own win-at-all-costs attitude and the biased town fathers who want his team to lose. And when bad luck and bad sportsmanship join forces in the championship game, Ronnie sees his dream ending in a shutout, unless...

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Speed Racer on April 23, 2012
Format: Perfect Paperback
This book should be required reading in middle schools - but parents would love it too. Ronnie LeBlanc, the pitcher for the Nina (Louisiana) Redbirds, an American Legion baseball team, wants to play in the majors. Which means he needs to get scouted. But the Redbirds don't have enough equipment to really play baseball, never mind enough money to buy uniforms or even so much as a new bat. Still, Ronnie's drive keeps the team together through some tough moments, until his drive is what what drives them apart, and Ronnie's dream of playing in the big show begins to disintegrate. The book speaks to themes of racial equality, class discrimination, sportsmanship and the meaning of family. A fine new effort from a great writer.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Wanda Lea Brayton on June 8, 2012
Format: Perfect Paperback
As soon as I began to read this book, the immediacy of my familiarity with its subjects, times, places, characters and descriptions became obvious to me, so I settled in for what I knew for certain would be a worthy venture - and by its ending, I knew my instincts had been correct. I was born in 1958, a girl barely squeezed in between two boys (with three older sisters) who was destined not for poodle skirts, makeup and "girl talk", but intended for scraped knees, building a clubhouse in a tree and learning to catch tadpoles and minnows by a small stream on a hot, lazy afternoon. All of us grew up with a ball glove stuck onto our hands - the smooth fit and fragrance of well-worn leather became a kind of portal leading us back to childhood and giving us a rare glimpse of the innocence and carefree companions we once knew.

What made it even more promising is that I actually lived (for 18 months) in one of those small towns in Louisiana that was mentioned several times in the book; even though the period of time being portrayed was much earlier than those of my own experiences, I could still envision these places with their brown dirt fields overflowing with the laughter and cheers of children as they learned the rules and were given admission into America's first and best game - baseball. However, in my case, it was softball, but I played hardball with many other children, as well. Sure, there were those other games meant for other seasons and other years, those being basketball and football - but in the beginning, there were the sweat-stained ball caps perched at an angle on our coaches' heads, the intimate feel of holding a bat for the first time with a strong sense of purpose and intent.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dinger on May 6, 2012
Format: Perfect Paperback
A really good baseball book that is more than baseball. Travel back to the 1950's and into the Deep South. Ronnie is like a lot of us trying to make a better life with the few skills he has ... but he's also caught up in responsibility, earning a living, etc. But he makes an unpopular choice - to bring on a black coach. In the South and in the 1950's that is a real problem. He has to learn about overcoming bigotry, family problems, being part of a team and rising above events that happened long ago.
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By Bonnie Golden on September 13, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's not the winning or losing, it's how you play the game - in baseball and in life. A great read for a quiet afternoon.
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