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Stealing Magic: A Sixty-Eight Rooms Adventure (The Sixty-Eight Rooms Adventures) Hardcover – January 24, 2012


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Stealing Magic: A Sixty-Eight Rooms Adventure (The Sixty-Eight Rooms Adventures) + The Pirate's Coin: A Sixty-Eight Rooms Adventure (The Sixty-Eight Rooms Adventures) + The Sixty-Eight Rooms (The Sixty-Eight Rooms Adventures)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Series: The Sixty-Eight Rooms Adventures (Book 2)
  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (January 24, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375868194
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375868191
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.9 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #114,045 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

This sequel to the popular The Sixty-Eight Rooms (2010) begins just a few months after the first book ended. Sixth-graders Ruthie and Jack are just coming down from their adventure at the Art Institute of Chicago’s minature Thorne Rooms. Well, really, inside the Thorne Rooms, as a magic key allowed them to shrink and enter the dollhouse-proportioned spaces. Now the key once more leads them back in time—until it’s stolen. The tension is cranked up even higher as the kids try to help a Jewish girl in 1937 Paris escape the Holocaust and also meet a slave girl in pre–Civil War Charleston. These events may be one too many, causing the magical machinations to become more complicated than ever. Still, there’s a respectable villian, plenty of action, and a nice dose of art and history to keep readers involved. Oh, and magic. Don’t forget the magic. Grades 4-7. --Ilene Cooper

About the Author

MARIANNE MALONE is the mother of three grown children, a former art teacher, and the cofounder of the Campus School Middle School for Girls in Urbana, Illinois. She and her husband divide their time between Urbana and Washington, DC. This is her first novel. For Teacher's Guides (including common core tie-ins) and more, visit MarianneMalone.com.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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My son loved this book!
Chi Mom
I hope there will be a third book in this series.
K. Phillipson
Her books are great reads for all ages.
Neesie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Counselor lady on January 30, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I loved reading The Sixty-Eight Rooms. When I opened to the first page of the sequel, Stealing Magic, I felt as though I was being reacquainted with friends I hadn't seen for a while. The second installment captures the excitement of the magical adventure that Ruthie and Jack stumbled upon in the first book. A villain has been introduced; items begin to disappear from the Thorne Rooms (the 68 miniature period rooms on permanent display in the Art Institute of Chicago) and not only do our heroes have to figure out who is stealing them, they have to devise a way to stop the thief without exposing the secret magic. Oh, and they help save the life of a Jewish refugee girl in 1937 Paris, and they meet a young slave girl in Charleston South Carolina, before the Civil War. I love how Malone weaves history into the fast paced action, so kids won't even notice they are learning a little something along the way. My young friends enjoy these books, and they are the kind I would have devoured at age 8-10. These books work great for read aloud and for a surprisingly big age range at that.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By K. Eckert on January 25, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I got an eGalley of this book to review from the publisher. This book is a sequel to Sixty Eight Rooms, which I read last year and really enjoyed. This book was equally fun and I enjoyed the mystery and magic involved. It seems like there will probably be another book following this one.

Ruthie and Jack thought that their adventures in the Throne Rooms were over. But there are still mysteries to be solved. Historical items are being stole from the rooms and Ruthie and Jack are concerned that these disappearance might be connected with an art thief that is running rampant in Chicago. Now they have to figure out if there is an art thief involved or if someone else has discovered the magic of the Sixty-Eight rooms. On their adventure to solve this mystery they will journey to 1937 Paris where they try and save a girl and her family from Nazis and they will solve the mystery of the strange purse that Ruthie got in the last book.

These are such wonderful books. The story is a bit simple and predictable but it is well put together and well written. Ruthie and Jack are smart and fun kids who have a good relationship with their parents and get drawn into the most wonderful mysteries. I loved that they spend more time in the magic Throne Rooms in this book than they did in the last book.

In the course of their adventure Ruthie and Jack learn a lot about history; they get to visit Paris during the Nazi takeover and they get to visit the South when slavery was still in practice. They solve a wonderful mystery and I really enjoyed how a number of little elements from the first book were tied into this story; it was well planned out and well put together.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By booksbooksbooks! on January 30, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I don't want to give anything away but I have to say that although what I expected to love most about these books was the fantasy of exploring the Chicago Art Institute's Thorne Rooms as a miniature person (I wished SO much that I could as a child...an even now), what I really love most is the main character, Ruthie. She's smart, thoughtful, and curious. She's always trying to do what's right, even when things get complicated, and I LOVE the dream sequences that haunt her as she puts the pieces together. I felt she was very truthfully conceived as a character, as was Pandora Pommeroy, the seemingly perfect-in-every-way interior designer...

I think this book would appeal to both boys and girls in later elementary school because Ruthie is not in the slightest a girly girl and between her and her best friend Jack, there is a lot of really fun and creative problem solving, which I think everyone will enjoy. It's a Bridge to Terabithia / Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler / Indian in the Cupboard reading level and adventure level. And it could provide a good bridge to some history lessons.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By W. Johnson on September 24, 2012
Format: Hardcover
My daughter and her friends positively LOVE "The Sixty-Eight Rooms" adventures. They've all read the books multiple times and the stories have even prompted a few trips to see the rooms at The Art Institute of Chicago. These stories have really sparked the girls' imaginations as they look forward to more titles in the series.

The series inspired my daughter to write a report on Narcissa Niblack Thorne. When she had trouble finding resources for the report, author Marianne Malone was very generous with her time in discussing Thorne's life with this 9 year old. I was very impressed by this effort on Malone's part. It's just that sort of kindness which we see too infrequently in this hectic world and speaks well of Malone not only as a captivating author, but as a fine person.

While her writing alone has done much to inspire my girl, her kindness has elevated her to the position once occupied by J.K. Rowling. :)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Susan Somberg on January 23, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I chose this rating because the book was the book was so good that I lost myself inside the rooms sharing the adventures. I would recommend this book to any age person. Having seen the Thorne rooms heightened my wonderment.

Susan Somberg
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