Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Steelworker Alley: How Class Works in Youngstown (ILR Press Books) Hardcover – June 1, 1999

ISBN-13: 000-0801434394 ISBN-10: 0801434394

2 New from $141.30 7 Used from $45.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$141.30 $45.00
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: ILR Press Books
  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press (June 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801434394
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801434396
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,022,623 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Bruno, an assistant professor in the Chicago Labor Education Program at the University of Illinois, blends personal memory, oral history, and archival research to document the social, economic, and political ties that bound Youngstown steelworkers to their fellow workers, families, communities, and class. Bruno argues that the postwar academic picture of "highly paid" manual laborers contentedly assuming middle-class values does not square with the workers' own perception of their lives. His steelworker father and friends defined themselves as working classAthey did hard physical labor, lived and socialized with other steelworkers in plant-gate neighborhoods, and had little in common with the middle-class foremen, plant managers, and owners. This book combines the immediacy of personal recollection with scholarly analysis to describe a working-class life that "unfolds on the plant floor, in the union hall, and throughout the neighborhood." Recommended for academic libraries with labor or oral history collections.ADuncan Stewart, State Historical Society of Iowa Lib., Iowa City
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"For this well-written ethnography, Bruno interviewed 75 retirees, wives and other residents. . . Readers see everyday working-class life. . . Recommended for classes in stratification, social history, and work."—Choice

"This book combines the immediacy of personal recollection with scholarly analysis to describe working-class life."—Library Journal. July 1999.

". . . Bruno has provided a very compelling discussion of how class works in Youngstown. . . Steelworker Alley is an important contribution to new working-class studies. Not only is it worker-centered, but it attempts to deal with the contradictory expressions of class in America. The book should be of interest to labour historians and educators, social scientists, and cultural geographers."—John Russo, Youngstown State University. Left History, 7.2

"Steel worker Alley is a compassionate book based on extensive research chronicling the lives and identities of men who had been steelworkers. Bruno offers a significant contribution to the debate on class consciousness by examining how the similarity of their lives on the job, at home and in their neighborhoods created the basis for a shred sense of identity for steelworkers. . . .This analytical account. . . . raises troubling concerns regarding the options people have to provide for their families in a economic system so heavily weighed against them."—June Corman, Canadian Journal of Sociology, March 2000.

"In marvellously well written passages, Bruno is able to really evoke a feeling for the working and home lives of his interviewees. . . . He builds up a picture of life experience that is completely at odds with any notion of the disappearance of the working class."—Diane Fieldes. The Journal of Industrial Relations. December, 1999.

"Steelworker Alley suggests that the recent books on working-class illiberalism do not tell the whole story."—Judith Stein, Graduate School and City College of the City University of New York. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, July 2000

"This textured, moving, analytical account is both an elegy for a lost world and a guide to the creation of solidarity and collective action in the face of many barriers. Utilizing the advantages of access, Robert Bruno paints a multidimensional portrait of steelworkers at work and at home, capturing their experiences and perspectives and presenting the reader with a picture of class in America that transcends the usual stereotypes."—Ira I. Katznelson, Columbia University

"Steelworker Alley calls into question the idea that American workers have become middle-class. At least in places like Robert Bruno's hometown in Ohio, where workers live in neighborhoods adjacent to the place of work, a pervasive consciousness of class appears to have survived into the 1990s. Bruno's work will inspire other young working-class intellectuals to explore as participant observers how, in their own families and communities, 'class consciousness emerged as a way of life.'"—Staughton Lynd, author of Living Inside Our Hope: A Steadfast Radical's Thoughts on Rebuilding the Movement --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 7, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Bruno's first and hopefully not his last!
You don't have to bea steelworker or from Youngstown to enjoy this book. Bruno's Yongstownis recognizable to all no mater where you live.
His portait of his hometown captures his family and neighbors who come alive in this interesting new work. Moreover, he has something to say and hesays it well!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
Having grown up in Youngstown, I can fully appreciate the degree to which the author has captured the spirit of the mills and the working class. Anyone interested in labor studies will find this a book well worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Bud494 on February 23, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting subject but very poorly written, the author couldnt decide if it was to be scholarly or emotional becoming neither.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Richard Frehs on June 12, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I grew up in the Youngstown area back in the 50's. My Father worked in the offices of Republic Steel and took an early retirement years before Black Friday. I remember my Grandmother sweeping mill cinders from the front porch every morning when the mills were operating and how the flames from the stacks would light up the night.

The book gives a good account of the people and life styles of those that worked in the mill. It is sad that Youngstown never recovered.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again