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Stephen King's The Stand


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Product Details

  • Actors: Gary Sinise, Molly Ringwald, Jamey Sheridan, Laura San Giacomo, Ruby Dee
  • Format: Widescreen, Color, Dolby, Special Edition, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Live / Artisan
  • DVD Release Date: October 26, 1999
  • Run Time: 366 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (556 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305594368
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #208,846 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Stephen King's The Stand" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Making-Of Featurette
  • Storyboard Comparison
  • Make-up Effects

Editorial Reviews

After a government-spawned "superflu" wipes out more than 90 percent of the earth's population, the devastated survivors must decide whether to support or resist the advances of a mysterious stranger from way down South (heh-heh) who wishes to claim this new world order for himself. Although the six-hour length makes it nigh-impossible to digest in one sitting, this well-paced adaptation of Stephen King's apocalyptic magnum opus ranks among the best adaptations of the author's work, with strong performances from Gary Sinise, Miguel Ferrer, and especially Jamey Sheridan as a good-old-boy version of Old Scratch. The opening scene, set to the strains of Blue Oyster Cult's "Don't Fear the Reaper," is one of the most chilling things ever shot for television. Director Mick Garris is no stranger to King's world, having also helmed Sleepwalkers, the recent television remake of The Shining, and the upcoming Desperation.

Customer Reviews

The acting is great, as well as the story line.
Matthew Kennedy
In addition, this movie also makes you think: If Armeggedon really did happen like this, where would you fit in?
"gotstuff"
This is one of those movies that I can watch and re-watch and never get sick of it.
Big Music Fan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

193 of 199 people found the following review helpful By Alex Diaz-Granados on January 4, 2004
Format: DVD
Hailed as one of the best fantasy/horror novels ever written, Stephen King's The Stand has been published in two different versions -- a slimmed down original edition in 1978 and a slightly updated and unabridged version in 1991. And although both stick to the same story -- a U.S. government-created strain of the flu wipes out 99% of humanity and the survivors join two opposing camps in the ultimate face-off between good and evil -- they differ somewhat, particularly at the very end.
Of all of King's novels, The Stand is the one most of his readers ask about or comment on, and until 1994, when ABC commissioned a miniseries based on this sprawling opus, one question always was "Will there be a movie based on this one?" (King replied in the foreword to the "uncut and unabridged" edition that he thought there might be...)
Unlike most of King's novels, the sheer scope of the novel guaranteed that The Stand would have to be a miniseries made for TV. To have compressed the 1,000-plus pages into a three-hour movie would have been impossible without deleting many characters and situations, a very risky proposition since The Stand is to King's legions of fans what The Lord of the Rings is to Tolkien's readers. And to have hired someone else to adapt it from book to teleplay would have been a risky proposition, so ABC asked King to take the writing reins.
Happily, the 1994 "Stephen King's The Stand" turned out to be a marvelous miniseries, and while it did not break any Nielsen ratings as "Alex Haley's Roots" did in 1977, it did fairly well and earned many good reviews.
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95 of 100 people found the following review helpful By doctor_beth #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 14, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
From the moment I first sat down to watch this miniseries in 1994 and heard the first few opening bars of "Don't Fear the Reaper," I have loved this movie. I have read every one of Stephen King's books and have seen most of the movies adapted from these books. Some of the adaptations have been awful, others good, and a few, such as The Shawshank Redemption, truly great; The Stand definitely belongs in this elite latter category. I have heard that some fans of King's novel were disappointed in this miniseries, but to me, what's not to like?
What really makes this movie work is the exceptional--and at times unconventional--casting. The Stand was my first exposure to Gary Sinise, and I immediately fell in love with his perfect portrayal of Stu. One of my teen idols, Rob Lowe, did an absolute amazing job with the role of Nick, proving that he had true range as an actor long before The West Wing came along. I don't know why Adam Storke has not had more career success, as his personification of Larry Underwood was flawless. And the supporting cast was nothing short of stellar: terrific veteran actor Ray Walston as Glen Bateman, Bill Fagerbakke's sensitive portrayal of Tom Cullen, and Miguel Ferrar's perfectly desperate and despicable Lloyd Henried. Although I would not have pictured Jamey Sheridan as Flagg, he definitely brought the character to life, striking a deft balance between Flagg's evil and humorous sides. The one woefully miscast role was Molly Ringwald's Frannie--I don't think she was what King or anyone else had in mind for this character. However, given that most of Ringwald's scenes are with Gary Sinise, this flaw is easily overlooked.
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63 of 69 people found the following review helpful By S. Smith VINE VOICE on February 11, 2003
Format: DVD
As Stephen King himself has said, The Stand is taken straight out of the Book of Revelations in the Bible, and this, in my opinion, makes the miniseries a classic tale of good versus evil. With nearly all the world's population dead due to a genetically engineered virus, the survivors begin to coalesce into two groups--one led by the benevolent Mother Abagail, and the other by the demonic Randall Flagg. It might seem through the first 3 parts of the miniseries that Flagg's group are in the ascendancy, but Mother Abagail & Co. have quite a few tricks up their sleeves.
The crop of actors in Stephen King's The Stand were a great bunch as well. Gary Sinise was perfect for the part of Stu Redman, the country boy from small-town Texas, and Molly Ringwald as Fran Goldsmith was very good. Adam Storke made a very believable Larry Underwood, and the casting of Coach's Bill Fagerbakke as Tom Cullen was an inspired choice. I especially loved the late Ray Walston as Glen Bateman, Jamey Sheridan as Flagg, Ruby Dee and her husband Ossie Davis in their respective parts of Mother Abagail and Judge Farris, Rob Lowe as Nick Andros, Just Shoot Me's Laura San Giacomo as Nadine Cross, the late Rosemary Clooney's son Miguel Ferrer as Lloyd Henreid, and Max Headroom's Matt Frewer as Trashcan Man. I had no complaints about Stargate SG-1's Corin (Corky) Nemec as Harold Lauder except for the fact that they could have plumped him out a bit for the part and had him lose weight so he'd be slender once he got to Boulder. Other than that, his acting was excellent.
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Remake of "The Stand"
I am sure it will not satisfy most people who love the book (as most adaptations do not), but it is an exciting prospect. I read that Ben Affleck is set to direct, and after seeing "The Town," I think it's a good choice. The most haunting aspect of the novel is thinking about what it... Read More
Dec 1, 2011 by Spencer Cox |  See all 6 posts
how old should you be to watch this
If you are old enough to read the book, you are old enough to see the show. The movie is far tamer. I'd let the average 13+ kid watch it, if I watched with.
Nov 1, 2006 by Nadine Hauklund |  See all 6 posts
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