Buy Used
$9.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ex-library book in very good shape. Clean, unmarked pgs except for usual library stamps. . This item is in Amazon's warehouse and shipped to you by Amazon. You have the assurance that you will get your item in a timely manner. OVERNIGHT AND 2-DAY SHIPPING AVAILABLE.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Steve Scott the Miler: America's Legendary Runner Talks About His Triumphs and Trials Hardcover – October 1, 1997


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$4.65 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 258 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan General Reference; Assumed First Edition edition (October 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0028616774
  • ISBN-13: 978-0028616773
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,303,721 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
I would highly recommend this book to both runners and non runners alike.
ironpecs
With the help of Marc Bloom, the longtime dedicated chronicler of Cross Country and Track, Scott helps us understand his love for running and for being really fit.
Geoff Pietsch
I don't know steve personally but if it were me I would have been upset as how the end result of this book makes me seem like such an thankful complainer.
Mickey Kaufman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By M. Tatar on April 20, 1998
Format: Hardcover
The sport of track and field has only a limited audience in the U.S. American athletes typically receive recognition only after setting a world record or winning an Olympic gold medal. Steve Scott, America's top miler throughout the 1980s, did neither. In his book, The Miler, Scott writes of a running career in which he unquestionably was America's best miler (his U.S. record of 3:47.69, set in 1982, still stands), and certainly one of the world's best (10 consecutive years ranked among the world's top 10 milers by Track & Field News). Yet without a world record or Olympic gold medal to his credit, Scott remained virtually unknown outside the small U.S. track and field community. The Miler traces Scott's reluctant beginnings as a high school runner, his development into a national-class competitor in college, and his emergence as a world-class racer. Along the way we're treated to profiles of Scott's leading international competitors, all icons in the history of the mile: John Walker, Eamonn Coghlan, Sebastian Coe, Steve Ovett and Said Aouita. Scott beat them all, but not in either of the two races -- the '84 or '88 Olympics -- which would have brought him the recognition and financial rewards that accompany a gold medal. The Miler is not simply a book about running. Scott details the struggles he faced to support his wife and kids early in his career, when track and field was still regarded as an "amateur" sport. Scott also writes frankly of the toll the nomadic career of a track and field athlete exacted upon his marriage. Although it probably was cathartic for Scott to write these passages, it is uncomfortable for even a dedicated track & field fan to read.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Geoff Pietsch on May 15, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Near the end of his autobiography, Steve Scott talks about running in the National Cross Country Championships in Montana (there are pictures of the race in the book). It was 4 degreees and snowy. Scott was past his prime as one of the greatest milers in the world. He didn't need to run the race; few World Class milers run serious 10K cross country at any time, let alone in their declining years. But Steve Scott loves to run. He loves to train very hard and run very fast. He finished 10th that day, not far behind distance greats like Pat Porter and Todd Williams, and just a few seconds away from qualifying as a member of the U.S. team for the World Cross Counttry Championships. Afterwards he overheard a couple of young runners talking. One said, in obvious surprise, "Did you see Steve Scott finished 10th? I thought he'd retired." His friend responded, "I thought he was dead."

Well Steve Scott ain't dead folks, and I'll bet wherever he is right now he's still running far and fast. Scott's autobiography is hard to find now. It never caught on the way some of the books for joggers did - or those about another Steve: Prefontaine. But read Scott's book if you can find it. Serious runners will love it and even joggers will be fascinated by its honesty and by the character - in both senses of the word - that Scott reveals. Jim Ryun remains the legendary American miler, but he would have been 30 meters behind Scott in their best races. Ryun gave up the sport in his early 20s because he couldn't handle the pressure; Scott raced at the highest levels for 20 years.

With the help of Marc Bloom, the longtime dedicated chronicler of Cross Country and Track, Scott helps us understand his love for running and for being really fit. He was "Pre" without the sharp edges.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Karl Romano on April 9, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Had seen Steve run on a number of occasions both on TV and in person, always impressed. What a record...136 sub-four minute miles run plus if you count the 1500 meters run under 3:42....nothing but incredible. Blessed with a gift he took it to the next level and beyond. The book was most interesting to read, a fresh look at the behind the scenes and the life of a world class runner and its demands. Looking back over the years I think to win a Metal in the Olympics takes a bit of luck too .... besides all the talent, work/training, mental toughness required as well as arriving healthy with a positive frame of mind ... all rolled into one for that special day....Takes a bit of Luck too.....years ago I had heard someone say "If the race or event was held on a different day a different winner would be crowned." Once you get to the Olympics...it is an honor to be their for your county it is a crap shoot. ....Recommend this book to an person who either runs competitively or just for fitness.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?